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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

John Watson

This study sought to clarify potentially conflicting results from two prior studies examining the “home advantage”, and possible “umpire bias”, in the Australian Football…

Abstract

Purpose

This study sought to clarify potentially conflicting results from two prior studies examining the “home advantage”, and possible “umpire bias”, in the Australian Football League (AFL).

Design/methodology/approach

Using categorical regression analysis, and controlling for team ability, the number of free kicks awarded to/against each AFL team during the home and away season of 2006 was investigated.

Findings

The findings support previous research suggesting home teams generally win more often and receive more favourable treatment from umpires. However, for games involving both a Victorian and a non‐Victorian team, there is clear evidence of “umpire bias” (beyond the traditional “home advantage”) operating against non‐Victorian teams.

Research limitations/implications

A major limitation of this study is that it only considers the number of free kicks awarded and not where, or when, those free kicks are awarded.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that the AFL should seriously consider appointing neutral umpires for all games (particularly those involving a Victorian and non‐Victorian team) and establishing an independent panel to oversee the development and selection of AFL umpires.

Originality/value

This is the first study of potential “bias” in the AFL that controls for team ability and, as such, helps to reconcile conflicting conclusions from two prior studies.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Lorraine Rumson

The historical study of sexuality during the Victorian period has been influenced heavily by the development of sexology as a scientific field. The impetus of sexology to…

Abstract

The historical study of sexuality during the Victorian period has been influenced heavily by the development of sexology as a scientific field. The impetus of sexology to delineate and categorize “types” of sexuality and sexual behavior has situated the late nineteenth century as a starting point for studies of contemporary concepts of sexual “abnormality.” However, research into this subject, while drawing on both legal and medical discourses, has overwhelmingly ignored the value of porn in reconstructing the dynamics of Victorian sexuality. Accordingly, this chapter integrates legal, medical, and pornographic discourses of the late nineteenth century to develop a more thorough examination of Victorian sexual experiences that fell outside the limits of prescribed legal and medical “normalcy.”

Details

Kink and Everyday Life
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-919-2

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Thomas A. Lee

The purpose of this paper is to study the incidence, impact, and consequences of accountant and lawyer bankruptcies in Victorian Scotland. The paper examines these…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the incidence, impact, and consequences of accountant and lawyer bankruptcies in Victorian Scotland. The paper examines these bankruptcies in the context of an emerging profession separating from an established legal profession as part of the rise of professionalism in the Victorian Age.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports data describing 135 accountant and 361 lawyer bankruptcies declared between 1855 and 1904. It uses theories of the rise of professionalism, signals of movement to occupational ascendancy, and social attitudes to money to provide explanations of the incidence, impact, and consequences of these bankruptcies. The paper also examines bankruptcy and the early disciplinary codes of professional accountancy associations.

Findings

Despite a trend of general decline in total, accountant, and lawyer bankruptcies in Scotland through the Victorian Age, there is no consistency over time between accountant and lawyer bankruptcies and economic conditions. Bankrupt accountants were typically unregulated as professionals in contrast with bankrupt lawyers who were usually regulated. Accountant and lawyer bankruptcies predominantly involved experienced practitioners, location in major cities, and administration by professional accountants. Bankruptcy was associated with criminal activity in a minority of cases in each profession. There was inconsistency in the post‐bankruptcy disciplining of bankrupt accountants and lawyers, and post‐bankruptcy loss of economic status in both professions.

Practical implications

The paper contributes to the Victorian history of institutionalised professions such as accounting and law. It demonstrates the presence of marginal practitioners in emerging and established professions, the need to study professionalisation in social context, and the impact of bankruptcy on discipline in an emerging profession.

Originality/value

The paper represents the first contextualised study of bankruptcy among professionals generally and accountants and lawyers, particularly in the Victorian Age.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Eric Glasgow

Presents a study of the somewhat retarded initiation of a public library in a very typical Victorian seaside resort, a balanced society and economy of residents and…

Abstract

Presents a study of the somewhat retarded initiation of a public library in a very typical Victorian seaside resort, a balanced society and economy of residents and holidaymakers, whose first faint beginnings came in 1792‐1798. Based on a thorough and detailed study of primary materials (specifically the minutes of the local library committee between 1878 and 1901), essentially, it depicts an interesting and significant microcosm of that evolving Victorian community. It is also set against the very noteworthy background of the proximity of both Liverpool and Manchester, as the pioneers of the public library movement in Victorian England. It denotes, therefore, the first motivations for a public library, in the setting of a Victorian seaside resort: the cross‐party support, the funding, and the alliance with the comparable and parallel movement for “popular” education. In summary, it is a valuable epitome of the story of a Victorian public library, perhaps the more interesting because it is so small, parochial and detached.

Details

Library Review, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2011

Jenny Morris and Ray Kinnear

Purpose — This chapter considers how transport policy and planning has been developing in Victoria in tandem with the research program described elsewhere in this book…

Abstract

Purpose — This chapter considers how transport policy and planning has been developing in Victoria in tandem with the research program described elsewhere in this book. Developments in policy and planning are discussed with particular regard to transport disadvantage and social inclusion.

Methodology — The chapter commences by providing a policy and planning context in terms of the geography and demography of travel needs, the relevant jurisdictional responsibilities in Australia and the policy history. It then describes the evolution of transport policy in the past decade and outlines the way in which the findings of this research are being incorporated into the development of programs and projects to support social inclusion. Additionally, some key policy challenges are outlined, at least some of which may provide fruitful areas for undertaking further research to support the development of future policies and programs.

Findings — The results show that applied research can be a highly successful endeavour, particularly when policy and planning perspectives are integrated into the development of the research design and strong collaboration is an ongoing feature of the research program.

Details

New Perspectives and Methods in Transport and Social Exclusion Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78-052200-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1979

Sally Ethridge

Victorian Periodicals: A Guide to Research. J. Don Vann and Rosemary T. VanArsdel, eds. New York, Modern Language Association of America, 1978. $17.00 cloth; $8.50 pa…

Abstract

Victorian Periodicals: A Guide to Research. J. Don Vann and Rosemary T. VanArsdel, eds. New York, Modern Language Association of America, 1978. $17.00 cloth; $8.50 pa. 188p. LC 77–94918. ISBN 0–87352–256–7; 0–87352–257–5 pa. So many of us in the field of library science owe our jobs to the fact that others articulate their own need to know; reference work itself arises out of this logical need. Many questions we answer involve the simple, “what?,” “when?,” and “where?” More complicated question‐and‐answer interactions deal with “why?” and “how?” Through interviews with one editor and one chapter author, this essay will invert the reference process upon itself and show the why and how involved in the conception and realization of the reference work entitled Victorian Periodicals: A Guide to Research.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Eric Glasgow

The enormous growth in publishing in Victorian England is surveyed from its origins in the eighteenth century to the demise, or survival, of principal publishing houses in…

Abstract

The enormous growth in publishing in Victorian England is surveyed from its origins in the eighteenth century to the demise, or survival, of principal publishing houses in the twentieth century. The major publishers ‐ Longman, Murray, Smith Elder, Chapman and Hall, Colburn, Bentley, Heinemann, Methuen and Macmillan ‐ are discussed in relation to their authors and publishing successes and failures. The relation between the full‐length book and the major literary journals is discussed and the capitalist, risk taking nature of publishing as a commercial enterprise is emphasised.

Details

Library Review, vol. 47 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Jonathan ‘Yotti’ Kingsley, Rebecca Phillips, Mardie Townsend and Claire Henderson‐Wilson

This article focuses on the qualitative methodologies employed in a research project developed in collaboration with Aboriginal advisors and gaining an in‐depth…

Abstract

This article focuses on the qualitative methodologies employed in a research project developed in collaboration with Aboriginal advisors and gaining an in‐depth understanding of Aboriginal Victorian peoples’1 connection to their ancestral lands. It outlines why qualitative methodologies were used and highlights the ethical dimensions of working with Aboriginal Victorian communities. A research partnership was developed between Aboriginal Victorian communities and the non‐Aboriginal researcher and this process was emphasised because in the past Australian Indigenous people have been grossly exploited in health research. The methods of semi‐structured interviews and focus groups were used to gain a better understanding of this topic. The novel point of this article is that it provides an honest reflection of the benefits and limitations of this qualitative research process from the perspectives of a non‐Aboriginal researcher and an Aboriginal participant, when emphasis is placed on a collaborative approach. The paper outlines what a successful qualitative research project looks like in Victorian Aboriginal communities. This can be used as a blueprint not only for working with Aboriginal Victorian communities, who have been marginalised within Australian society, but may also be relevant to other culturally diverse communities throughout the world.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2010

Ingrid Jeacle

This paper aims to consider the role of the bank clerk in the Victorian era and to provide insights into clerical life in a London bank during the period.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider the role of the bank clerk in the Victorian era and to provide insights into clerical life in a London bank during the period.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on the archival records of Hoare and Company. Founded in the seventeenth century, it is the oldest surviving independent bank in the UK.

Findings

Drawing on the company's archival records, the paper examines issues such as recruitment, house rules, acts of paternalism and the overwhelming concern with maintaining respectability. While Hoare's clerks humorously referred to themselves as the Association of the Sons of Toil, the records support the literature in revealing the relatively cosseted career of the bank clerk within Victorian clerical circles. He generally enjoyed a higher salary, longer holidays and more favourable working conditions than his clerical counterparts. It was therefore a highly sought after position. Only those of impeccable character however, were recruited into its ranks.

Practical implications

The paper suggests the potential significance of Victorian values to the recruitment and general working conditions of contemporary members of the financial community.

Originality/value

The paper's value lies in supplementing the existing literature with further insights into the life of the Victorian bank clerk.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2018

Beth Marsden

The purpose of this paper is to examine the ways in which the mobility of indigenous people in Victoria during the 1960s enabled them to resist the policy of assimilation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the ways in which the mobility of indigenous people in Victoria during the 1960s enabled them to resist the policy of assimilation as evident in the structures of schooling. It argues that the ideology of assimilation was pervasive in the Education Department’s approach to Aboriginal education and inherent in the curriculum it produced for use in state schools. This is central to the construction of the state of Victoria as being devoid of Aboriginal people, which contributes to a particularly Victorian perspective of Australia’s national identity in relation to indigenous people and culture.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper utilises the state school records of the Victorian Department of Education, as well as the curriculum documentation and resources the department produced. It also examines the records of the Aborigines Welfare Board.

Findings

The Victorian Education Department’s curriculum constructed a narrative of learning and schools which denied the presence of Aboriginal children in classrooms, and in the state of Victoria itself. These representations reflect the Department and the Victorian Government’s determination to deny the presence of Aboriginal children, a view more salient in Victoria than elsewhere in the nation due to the particularities of how Aboriginality was understood. Yet the mobility of Aboriginal students – illustrated in this paper through a case study – challenged both the representations of Aboriginal Victorians, and the school system itself.

Originality/value

This paper is inspired by the growing scholarship on Indigenous mobility in settler-colonial studies and offers a new perspective on assimilation in Victoria. It interrogates how curriculum intersected with the position of Aboriginal students in Victorian state schools, and how their position – which was often highly mobile – was influenced by the practices of assimilation, and by Aboriginal resistance and responses to assimilationist practices in their lives. This paper contributes to histories of assimilation, Aboriginal history and education in Victoria.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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