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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2020

Iain Davies, Caroline J. Oates, Caroline Tynan, Marylyn Carrigan, Katherine Casey, Teresa Heath, Claudia E. Henninger, Maria Lichrou, Pierre McDonagh, Seonaidh McDonald, Sally McKechnie, Fraser McLeay, Lisa O'Malley and Victoria Wells

Seeking ways towards a sustainable future is the most dominant socio-political challenge of our time. Marketing should have a crucial role to play in leading research and…

2338

Abstract

Purpose

Seeking ways towards a sustainable future is the most dominant socio-political challenge of our time. Marketing should have a crucial role to play in leading research and impact in sustainability, yet it is limited by relying on cognitive behavioural theories rooted in the 1970s, which have proved to have little bearing on actual behaviour. This paper aims to interrogate why marketing is failing to address the challenge of sustainability and identify alternative approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

The constraint in theoretical development contextualises the problem, followed by a focus on four key themes to promote theory development: developing sustainable people; models of alternative consumption; building towards sustainable marketplaces; and theoretical domains for the future. These themes were developed and refined during the 2018 Academy of Marketing workshop on seeking sustainable futures. MacInnis’s (2011) framework for conceptual contributions in marketing provides the narrative thread and structure.

Findings

The current state of play is explicated, combining the four themes and MacInnis’s framework to identify the failures and gaps in extant approaches to the field.

Research limitations/implications

This paper sets a new research agenda for the marketing discipline in quest for sustainable futures in marketing and consumer research.

Practical implications

Approaches are proposed which will allow the transformation of the dominant socio-economic systems towards a model capable of promoting a sustainable future.

Originality/value

The paper provides thought leadership in marketing and sustainability as befits the special issue, by moving beyond the description of the problem to making a conceptual contribution and setting a research agenda for the future.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 February 2021

Victoria Wells, Navdeep Athwal, Esterina Nervino and Marylyn Carrigan

By responding to scholarly calls, this study examines the environmental reports of LVMH and Kering. The study extends legitimacy theory to ascertain the credibility of the…

1633

Abstract

Purpose

By responding to scholarly calls, this study examines the environmental reports of LVMH and Kering. The study extends legitimacy theory to ascertain the credibility of the aforementioned luxury conglomerates' commitment to environmental sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

A corpus-assisted discourse analysis centred upon the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) guidelines is used to examine the environmental disclosures of LVMH and Kering.

Findings

The findings show inconsistencies due to the lack of brand-level reporting and reporting quality falls short of comparable sustainability reporting within each conglomerate and with one another. Selective and unbalanced reporting along with symbolic management undermines the legitimacy of sustainability efforts by LVMH and Kering.

Originality/value

Despite the increased attention paid to sustainable luxury, few studies critically analyse how luxury brands formally report on sustainability.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2018

Laura Lea, Sue Holttum, Victoria Butters, Diana Byrne, Helen Cable, Di Morris, John Richardson, Linda Riley and Hannah Warren

The 2014/2015 UK requirement for involvement of service users and carers in training mental health professionals has prompted the authors to review the work of involvement…

Abstract

Purpose

The 2014/2015 UK requirement for involvement of service users and carers in training mental health professionals has prompted the authors to review the work of involvement in clinical psychology training in the university programme. Have the voices of service users and carers been heard? The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors update the paper of 2011 in which the authors described the challenges of inclusion and the specific approaches the authors take to involvement. The authors do this in the context of the recent change to UK standards for service user and carer involvement, and recent developments in relation to partnership working and co-production in mental healthcare. The authors describe the work carried out by the authors – members of a service user involvement group at a UK university – to ensure the voices of people affected by mental health difficulties are included in all aspects of training.

Findings

Careful work and the need for dedicated time is required to enable inclusive, effective and comprehensive participation in a mental health training programme. It is apparent that there is a group of service users whose voice is less heard: those who are training to be mental health workers.

Social implications

For some people, involvement has increased. Trainee mental health professionals’ own experience of distress may need more recognition and valuing.

Originality/value

The authors are in a unique position to review a service-user-led project, which has run for 12 years, whose aim has been to embed involvement in training. The authors can identify both achievements and challenges.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2019

Allegra Clare Schermuly and Helen Forbes-Mewett

This paper is drawn from a larger study investigating community perceptions of police legitimacy in the Monash Local Government Area (LGA), in the Australian state of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is drawn from a larger study investigating community perceptions of police legitimacy in the Monash Local Government Area (LGA), in the Australian state of Victoria. Monash had seen declining results in the official government survey in the indicators that assessed police legitimacy over the preceding decade. The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of both migrant and non-migrant participants to understand the role of migrant status in influencing assessments of police legitimacy in Monash LGA.

Design/methodology/approach

Through six focus groups, 18 interviews and one e-mail response with 31 individuals, perceptions of Victoria Police among the communities of Monash were collated and analysed.

Findings

One of the key findings of the study was that ethnic diversity and/or migrant status of community members were a key factor raised in response to questions about community perceptions of the legitimacy of Victoria Police in Monash LGA. Demographic change had been significant in Monash LGA over the preceding decade, including increasing ethnic diversity in the population and a shift in migration patterns from predominantly European to migrants from East and South Asia. In this paper, the authors suggest that the migrant status of Monash residents was a key factor that both migrant and non-migrant participants thought influenced perceptions of the police. Accordingly, because migrants make up a significant cohort of Australia’s population, we afford due attention to this previously overlooked topic.

Practical implications

The practical implications of this paper are as follows: existing Victoria Police partnerships in the Monash community should be continued and expanded where possible; Victoria Police should also prioritise partnerships with large, new migrant communities, for example, Monash’s Chinese communities; orientation for new migrants to Victoria around the criminal justice system, including Victoria Police, would help new migrants be more aware of their rights and what to expect of law enforcement in their new host country; police should continue to increase representation of ethnic diversity in the force via recruitment of greater numbers of ethnically diverse police members.

Originality/value

Although there have been previous Australian studies on migrant status as a factor in perceptions of criminal justice (see Murphy and Cherney, 2011, 2012; Hong Chui and Kwok-Yin Cheng, 2014), the paper identifies a distinct narrative around migrants’ views of Victoria Police which the authors believe warrant further investigation using an example from a local context. Furthermore, most research in this field has been quantitative. The current study provides additional new insights through an in-depth qualitative approach.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045029-2

Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Allegra Clare Schermuly

If police are perceived as legitimate, communities are more likely to assist in the fight against crime making policework easier and resources go further. The problem is…

Abstract

If police are perceived as legitimate, communities are more likely to assist in the fight against crime making policework easier and resources go further. The problem is, members of a diverse community may view the police in different ways making it difficult for police to be everything to everyone. This study reveals two strands of emerging vulnerability in relation to law and order in a rapidly urbanising area, affecting perceptions of police legitimacy for both groups. The study also demonstrated the relationship between global processes and local issues. The chapter draws on data from a larger study which explored the legitimacy of Victoria Police in the Monash Local Government Area in Melbourne, Australia. Community perceptions of the police were collected during 6 focus groups and 18 interviews. For the past decade, Monash had experienced declining results in the government’s quarterly policing survey in areas that assessed police legitimacy. This research utilised qualitative methods to gather detailed community opinions, in contrast to the quantitative government survey. The chapter focusses on the key finding that there had been many changes in Monash during the preceding decade, including intense urbanisation and increased ethnic diversity. However, police services had not been correspondingly increased or diversified and were not thought adequate to respond to current demands. As a result, community members felt vulnerable and this influenced community perceptions of Victoria Police. Rapid urbanisation has implications for police legitimacy. It is important that police services and infrastructure are not neglected during periods of urban change in order to mitigate feelings of vulnerability in different communities.

Details

Vulnerability in a Mobile World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-912-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Chelsea Renshaw and Chern Li Liew

This paper aims to examine the attitudes and experiences of information professionals with descriptive standards and collection management systems (CMSs) used for managing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the attitudes and experiences of information professionals with descriptive standards and collection management systems (CMSs) used for managing documentary heritage collections held by cultural heritage institutions in New Zealand (NZ). The aim is that such insights will inform decision-making around promoting documentary heritage collections discoverability and accessibility, in terms of advocating for appropriate system requirements when procuring or updating CMSs, and application of descriptive standards.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative design was applied to investigate the attitudes and experiences of information professionals working in libraries, archives and records management institutions, museums and public galleries. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews with thirteen participants who worked across ten different cultural heritage institutions.

Findings

The findings reveal that variances among metadata in libraries, museums, public galleries, archives and records management institutions continue to lead to challenges around discovery and access of documentary heritage. If opportunities for connecting documentary heritage collections in the age of linked data are to be realized, the sector needs to work collectively to address these variances along with consideration of the CMSs used. The study findings highlight issues currently affecting the NZ cultural heritage sector goal to make collections discoverable and more widely accessible.

Originality/value

The findings highlight a need for deeper research into CMSs used by the cultural heritage sector as these systems have an impact on metadata management including constraining the application of appropriate descriptive standards for documentary heritage collections.

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1996

Julie Hill

Describes Liverpool Victoria’s recent attempts to improve customer loyalty. Outlines the company’s history and its traditional values and client base and shows how, in…

955

Abstract

Describes Liverpool Victoria’s recent attempts to improve customer loyalty. Outlines the company’s history and its traditional values and client base and shows how, in spite of very low brand awareness, the organization has retained many of its customers. With changing demographic patterns it has been necessary to update the company’s strategy and, in 1993, a marketing department was formed. It became clear that although the relationship between agents and clients was strong, that between agents and head office was non‐existent. Outlines ways in which a brand image has been developed.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Paul Strickland, Jennifer Smith‐Maguire and Warwick Frost

The aim of this exploratory study is to investigate the benefits of “New World” wineries using family heritage as a legitimate marketing technique. “Old World” regions…

1189

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this exploratory study is to investigate the benefits of “New World” wineries using family heritage as a legitimate marketing technique. “Old World” regions have been leveraging off the often long association the wineries family has in wine making to assist in generating wine sales. This marketing initiative is now being applied to “New World” wineries with increasing success.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study investigated three wineries including their web sites, print media and consumer responses. The case studies had to include wineries that were family owned and actively promoted and marketed their winery as having a strong family heritage link in Victoria, Australia.

Findings

The results of this investigation suggest that family heritage is a legitimate marketing technique for “New World” wineries to assist in wine sales. If a family link can be established, there is no reason why “New World” wineries cannot promote family heritage, even if the winery is relatively new or a family has not worked in the industry for an extended period of time.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to acknowledge that family heritage is important in creating a “story” for the winery to assist in wine sales generation. By examining “New World” wineries regarding family heritage usage, this paper suggests that it is a legitimate marketing technique that other authors have never explored.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2007

Lesley Preston

School sex education has the potential to evoke a range of personal and political reactions. While it is usually agreed that sexuality should be ‘done’ in school, few…

Abstract

School sex education has the potential to evoke a range of personal and political reactions. While it is usually agreed that sexuality should be ‘done’ in school, few agree on the best way of ‘doing’ it. This article provides a personal account of the development of sex education at Shepparton South Technical School, Victoria, Australia from 1973‐1985. It is supported by interviews with the people involved in those events and archival materials, including media reports. It also documents the efforts of extreme right activists to discredit and stop programmes, and the State Liberal government’s attempt to formulate a policy on sex education. First I provide a general background to technical schools in Victoria in the 1970s followed by a discussion of Shepparton South Technical School specifically. I then discuss the development of the sex education (social biology) programme, the pivotal role of the Social Biology resource Centre, and the networks involved. I also describe the attacks on the programme in the late 1970s, and their origins and impact. I conclude with a discussion of the outcomes of this intense public scrutiny, and the demise of social biology and the secondary technical schools, the ‘techs’ in the 1980s.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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