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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Victoria Uren and Aba-Sah Dadzie

The purpose of this paper is to assess high-dimensional visualisation, combined with pattern matching, as an approach to observing dynamic changes in the ways people tweet…

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1518

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess high-dimensional visualisation, combined with pattern matching, as an approach to observing dynamic changes in the ways people tweet about science topics.

Design/methodology/approach

The high-dimensional visualisation approach was applied to three science topics to test its effectiveness for longitudinal analysis of message framing on Twitter over two disjoint periods in time. The paper uses coding frames to drive categorisation and visual analytics of tweets discussing the science topics.

Findings

The findings point to the potential of this mixed methods approach, as it allows sufficiently high sensitivity to recognise and support the analysis of non-trending as well as trending topics on Twitter.

Research limitations/implications

Three topics are studied, these illustrate a range of frames, but results may not be representative of all science topics.

Social implications

Funding bodies increasingly encourage scientists to participate in public engagement. As social media provides an avenue actively utilised for public communication, understanding the nature of the dialog on this medium is important for the scientific community and the public at large.

Originality/value

This study differs from standard approaches to the analysis of micropost data, which tend to focus on large-scale data sets. It provides evidence that this approach enables practical and effective analysis of the content of midsize to large collections of microposts.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 67 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Victoria Uren, Daniel Wright , James Scott, Yulan He and Hassan Saif

This paper aims to address the following challenge: the push to widen participation in public consultation suggests social media as an additional mechanism through which…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the following challenge: the push to widen participation in public consultation suggests social media as an additional mechanism through which to engage the public. Bioenergy companies need to build their capacity to communicate in these new media and to monitor the attitudes of the public and opposition organizations towards energy development projects.

Design/methodology/approach

This short paper outlines the planning issues bioenergy developments face and the main methods of communication used in the public consultation process in the UK. The potential role of social media in communication with stakeholders is identified. The capacity of sentiment analysis to mine opinions from social media is summarised and illustrated using a sample of tweets containing the term “bioenergy”.

Findings

Social media have the potential to improve information flows between stakeholders and developers. Sentiment analysis is a viable methodology, which bioenergy companies should be using to measure public opinion in the consultation process. Preliminary analysis shows promising results.

Research limitations/implications

Analysis is preliminary and based on a small dataset. It is intended only to illustrate the potential of sentiment analysis and not to draw general conclusions about the bioenergy sector.

Social implications

Social media have the potential to open access to the consultation process and help bioenergy companies to make use of waste for energy developments.

Originality/value

Opinion mining, though established in marketing and political analysis, is not yet systematically applied as a planning consultation tool. This is a missed opportunity.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Prasanta Kumar Dey

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207

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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2650

Abstract

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 67 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1955

Returning now to the food and drug law itself, for an additional explanation of it. This law is broadly divided into two regulatory parts ; but they each have a common…

Abstract

Returning now to the food and drug law itself, for an additional explanation of it. This law is broadly divided into two regulatory parts ; but they each have a common protective purpose, which has been defined. The first part of this law is a basic one just indicated. For it is a law to prohibit an injurious or deceitful adulteration, misbranding and false advertisement of all food and drugs ; and its last prohibition was added in the twentieth century, when the art of modern commercial advertising was developed. The major statute of this law is of course the 1938 Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, which is practically administered by the United States Food and Drug Administration ; and it has the supreme importance of being our national law to outlaw any food or drug that may kill or harm.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 57 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2014

Andrew Funston and Nicolette Lee

Australian academics and students are discovering the value of final-year capstone units. Often designed as inquiry-based projects, capstones can engage students in…

Abstract

Australian academics and students are discovering the value of final-year capstone units. Often designed as inquiry-based projects, capstones can engage students in authentic work that interests them personally, while building on their disciplinary knowledge and graduate capabilities. However, for some academics dealing with less academically accomplished students, the focus on student-directed activity that is inherent in inquiry-based learning can be a cause of concern. The cross-disciplinary inquiry-based capstone in Arts at an Australian university discussed in this chapter should allay some of those concerns. The cohort at this university includes a high proportion of non-traditional and first in the family students, many from non-English speaking backgrounds. The success of this capstone stems from student teams selecting and designing their own projects, often drawing on knowledge(s) and concerns relevant to their own diverse communities. The flexible framework and guided inquiry approach sees tutors step back – becoming facilitators rather than experts – and this in turn builds students’ confidence in their capacity to plan and execute their projects. The range and quality of student projects carried out in this capstone (many of which involve close links with local communities and advocacy organisations) attest to the value of cross-disciplinary, inquiry-based and student-managed capstone units.

Details

Inquiry-based Learning for Faculty and Institutional Development: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-235-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Glenice J. Wood and Margaret Lindorff

Tests the prediction that there will be sex differences in how middle managers perceive promotion requirements, and that such differences will be influenced by societal…

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3098

Abstract

Tests the prediction that there will be sex differences in how middle managers perceive promotion requirements, and that such differences will be influenced by societal expectations of gender appropriateness, in which women are expected to display communal (nurturing, interpersonally sensitive) and men agentic (independent, assertive and ambitious) qualities and behaviour. Results from 351 male and 156 female managers indicated that sex does not strongly influence the belief that every manager receives the same opportunities for advancement. However, there were sex differences in the reasons given for unequal career advancement, personal career progress, achievement of the last promotion received, and why a future promotion may not occur. Additionally, although male and female managers have similar aspirations to obtain a senior management position, women are less likely to expect a promotion. The results partially support the predictions of social‐role theory.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Abstract

Details

National Identity and Education in Early Twentieth Century Australia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-246-6

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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2014

Abstract

Details

Inquiry-based Learning for Faculty and Institutional Development: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-235-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1962

Publication of the Aslib Year Book is to be discontinued. A full and up‐to‐date list of Aslib members will be published in 1963.

Abstract

Publication of the Aslib Year Book is to be discontinued. A full and up‐to‐date list of Aslib members will be published in 1963.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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