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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Stephen Joseph, Charlotte Beer, David Clarke, Allan Forman, Martyn Pickersgill, Judy Swift, John Taylor and Victoria Tischler

In 2005, the Qualitative Methods in Psychosocial Health Research Group (QMiPHR) at the University of Nottingham was established as a forum to bring together academics…

Abstract

In 2005, the Qualitative Methods in Psychosocial Health Research Group (QMiPHR) at the University of Nottingham was established as a forum to bring together academics, researchers and practitioners with an interest in qualitative methods. The group has provided colleagues in nutrition, psychiatry, psychology, social work and sociology with a forum for discussion around the question of how qualitative research is able to contribute to understanding mental health and the development of evidence‐based treatment. As a group, we asked ourselves where we stood in relation to the use of qualitative methods in mental health. While we are unified in our view that qualitative research is important and under‐utilised in mental health research, our discussions uncovered a range of views on the underlying philosophical stance of what it means to be a qualitative researcher in mental health. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of our discussions and our view that as qualitative approaches have become more widely accepted they have largely been assimilated within the mainstream ‘medical model’ of research. In this paper, we call for researchers to re‐engage with the philosophical discussion on the role and purpose of qualitative enquiry as it applies to mental health, and for practitioners and decision‐makers to be aware of the implicit values underpinning research.

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Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2009

Victoria Tischler, Emma Bronjewski, Katherine O'Connor and Tim Calton

We report the findings from a study exploring the experiences of individuals undergoing MRI scanning for research. Semi‐structured interviews took place before and after…

Abstract

We report the findings from a study exploring the experiences of individuals undergoing MRI scanning for research. Semi‐structured interviews took place before and after scanning with 17 participants; 12 were healthy volunteers and five were patients with a diagnosis of remitted depression. Themes of apprehension and curiosity prior to scanning were common in both groups. Patients were often confused about the procedure. Negative feelings were an issue at the outset, characterised by shock related to the physical surroundings, after which positive feelings, for example relaxation, were often experienced, and in the case of patients, learning more about their brain. Written information about imaging was deemed satisfactory; however the ability to ‘experience’ aspects of scanning beforehand was suggested. Scanning may be viewed as a process beginning prior to the procedure itself and involving positive and negative emotions. Increased information, reassurance and a more interactive intervention to reduce anxiety may be beneficial and may improve individuals' experience of this widely used procedure.

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Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Victoria Tischler and Peter Gregory

The aim of the research described in this paper was to examine the housing and resettlement needs of homeless and vulnerably housed parents, in order to inform the…

Abstract

The aim of the research described in this paper was to examine the housing and resettlement needs of homeless and vulnerably housed parents, in order to inform the development of a family outreach support worker service for this population. Focus groups and individual semi‐structured interviews were used. This exploratory study has demonstrated that both homeless and housed families have complex and multiple needs that can be met by resettlement services.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2010

Paul Crawford, Brian Brown, Victoria Tischler and Charley Baker

This discussion paper reviews and critiques literature related to the evolution of the medical humanities as an academic discipline and its contribution to healthcare…

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Abstract

This discussion paper reviews and critiques literature related to the evolution of the medical humanities as an academic discipline and its contribution to healthcare provision. We argue that despite considerable advances in the field of medical humanities, needs have been identified for a more inclusive, outward‐facing and applied discipline. These needs can be met in the form of what we have called the health humanities, which both embrace interdisciplinarity and engage with the contributions of those marginalised from the medical humanities ‐ for example, allied health professionals, nurses, patients and carers. It is argued that there is a need for new thinking to develop the discipline of health humanities, to develop, provide and share research, expertise, training and education.

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Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2021

Gary Winship

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Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2021

Sydney Cheek-O'Donnell

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Theatre
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-336-9

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Book part
Publication date: 18 March 2021

J. Yoon Irons and Grenville Hancox

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Singing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-332-1

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Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2020

Steven Schlozman

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Arts For Health: Film
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-312-3

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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Philip Davis and Fiona Magee

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Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

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Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Curie Scott

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Drawing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-325-3

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