Search results

1 – 6 of 6
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Sabrina Helm, Joyce Serido, Sun Young Ahn, Victoria Ligon and Soyeon Shim

The purpose of this study is to examine young consumers’ financial behavior (e.g. saving) and pro-environmental behavior (i.e. reduced consumption and green buying) as…

Downloads
3356

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine young consumers’ financial behavior (e.g. saving) and pro-environmental behavior (i.e. reduced consumption and green buying) as effective proactive strategies undertaken in the present to satisfy materialistic values and maximize well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on an online survey among a panel of young American adults (N = 968).

Findings

The study finds a positive effect of materialism on personal well-being and negative effects on financial satisfaction, proactive financial coping and reduced consumption, but no effect on green buying, a separate and distinct pro-environmental strategy. Both proactive financial coping and reduced consumption are positively associated with subjective well-being.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should re-examine conceptualizations of materialism in the context of climate change and the meaning of possessions in the global digital economy; studies could also focus on the specific well-being effects of reduced consumption and alternative pathways to align materialistic and environmental values.

Practical implications

Consumer education should look to models of financial education to demonstrate how limited natural resources can be managed at the micro level to enhance consumers’ subjective well-being, as well as reduce resource strain at the macro level.

Originality/value

Key contributions are the examination of materialism and consumption in the dual contexts of financial and environmental resource constraints and the effects of these key macro-social phenomena on consumers’ perceived well-being. Another study highlight is the differentiation of two strategies for proactive environmental coping, of which only one, reduced consumption, increased personal well-being and decreased psychological distress.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 November 2019

Farzana Quoquab and Jihad Mohammad

Abstract

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2009

Rune Elvik, Alena Høye, Truls Vaa and Michael Sørensen

Abstract

Details

The Handbook of Road Safety Measures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-250-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 31 July 2020

David B. Szabla, Elizabeth Shaffer, Ashlie Mouw and Addelyne Turks

Despite the breadth of knowledge on self and identity formation across the study of organizations, the field of organizational development and change has limited research…

Abstract

Despite the breadth of knowledge on self and identity formation across the study of organizations, the field of organizational development and change has limited research on the construction of professional identity. Much has been written to describe the “self-concepts” of those practicing and researching in the field, but there have been no investigations that have explored how these “self-concepts” form. In addition, although women have contributed to defining the “self” in the field, men have held the dominant perspective on the subject. Thus, in this chapter, we address a disparity in the research by exploring the construction of professional identity in the field of organizational development and change, and we give voice to the renowned women who helped to build the field. Using the profiles of 17 American women included in The Palgrave Handbook of Organizational Change Thinkers, we perform a narrative analysis based upon the concepts and models prevalent in the literature on identity formation. By disentangling professional identity formation of the notable women in the field, we can begin to see the nuance and particularities involved in its construction and gain deeper understandings about effective ways to prepare individuals to work in and advance the field.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Judy Brown

The purpose of the paper is to explore the potential of visual cultural studies (VCS) to inform and extend research on “accounting and the visual”.

Downloads
3499

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to explore the potential of visual cultural studies (VCS) to inform and extend research on “accounting and the visual”.

Design/methodology/approach

A VCS framework is utilized: to draw together and organize work on “accounting and the visual”; and to illustrate how concepts and empirical studies from VCS can develop and extend accounting research.

Findings

The “visual culture turn” in the social sciences has generated considerable theorizing and empirical research pertinent to accounting research. In particular, it can deepen studies of accounting visuality – accounting's visibilities, invisibilities and ways of seeing – and stimulate new imag(in)ings.

Practical implications

The paper introduces accounting researchers to questions, topics, concepts and debates in the VCS field and illustrates how accounting and VCS research can mutually inform each other and foster interpretive/critical accounting projects.

Originality/value

VCS can frame studies of “accounting and the visual” (i.e. affirm it as a distinct field, with rich interdisciplinary connections) with implications for developing and extending accounting research.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Nyree J. Taylor, Reeva Lederman, Rachelle Bosua and Marcello La Rosa

Capture, consumption and use of person-centred information presents challenges for hospitals when operating within the scope of limited resources and the push for…

Abstract

Purpose

Capture, consumption and use of person-centred information presents challenges for hospitals when operating within the scope of limited resources and the push for organisational routines and efficiencies. This paper explores these challenges for patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) and the examination of information that supports successful hospital discharge. It aims to determine how the likelihood of readmission may be prevented through the capturing of rich, person-specific information during in-patient care to improve the process for discharge to home.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors combine four research data collection and analysis techniques: one, an analysis of the patient record; two, semi-structured longitudinal interviews; three, an analysis of the patient's journey using process mining to provide analytics about the discharge process, and four, a focus group with nurses to validate and confirm our findings.

Findings

The authors’ contribution is to show that information systems which support discharge need to consider models focused on individual patient stressors. The authors find that current discharge information capture does not provide the required person-centred information to support a successful discharge. Data indicate that rich, detailed information about the person acquired through additional nursing assessments are required to complement data provided about the patient's journey in order to support the patients’ post-discharge recovery at home.

Originality/value

Prior research has focused on information collection constrained by pre-determined limitations and barriers of system design. This work has not considered the information provided by multiple sources during the whole patient journey as a mechanism to reshape the discharge process to become more person-centred. Using a novel combination of research techniques and theory, the authors have shown that patient information collected through multiple channels across the patient care journey may significantly extend the quality of patient care beyond hospital discharge. Although not assessed in this study, rich, person-centred discharge information may also decrease the likelihood of patient readmission.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

1 – 6 of 6