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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Jason Morris and Victoria Knight

The purpose of this paper is to set out an approach to innovation in criminal justice settings that gives service users a “voice” through the co-production of digital…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set out an approach to innovation in criminal justice settings that gives service users a “voice” through the co-production of digital content designed for services that promote desistance. The authors describe the benefits and challenges of involving service users in co-creating mediated digital content within a co-production framework.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a new methodology for developing desistance-oriented programmes. The authors draw on a distinctive co-production exemplar within a prison setting that captures the perspectives of people who have shared their voices and the authors begin to explore the impact that co-production has had for them and for the service.

Findings

The testimonies of service users involved in this exemplar provide insights into the benefits and challenges of co-production in the criminal justice system more broadly.

Practical implications

Co-production is a credible service design strategy for developing digital services in prisons and probation; Complementary Digital Media (CDM) provides a promising pedagogical approach to promoting desistance; CDM enables service users to share their voice and stories to assist their peers. Digitally enabled courses to promote desistance can be well suited to peer support delivery models.

Originality/value

CDM is a novel approach that uses co-production to create highly tailored content to promote desistance in discrete target groups. CDM can be used to digitalise processes within traditional offending behaviour programmes (OBPs). It can also enable the development of innovative toolkit approaches for flexible use within day-to-day therapeutic conversations between service users and criminal justice staff or peer supporters. CDM thereby offers practitioners in criminal justice settings an entirely new set of evidence-informed resources to engage service users.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Victoria Knight

This article presents the key findings of an investigation into minority ethnic prisoners' knowledge and perceptions of the Probation and Prison Services in the east of…

Abstract

This article presents the key findings of an investigation into minority ethnic prisoners' knowledge and perceptions of the Probation and Prison Services in the east of England. The first part of the article puts this study into disciplinary context by examining relevant and topical research and debate about minority ethnic service users' experiences and treatment within the criminal justice system. Most notably perceptions and opinions of minority ethnic service users are limited. However accounts of discrimination and racism within elements of the criminal justice system provide a useful springboard to understand and collect much awaited data in this area. The final part of the article summarises the key findings of this investigation and goes on to make useful recommendations to the service providers in terms of developing and establishing effective race relations in the shape of policy development, consequent action and for further investigative studies of this nature.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Garry D. Carnegie

Investigates the dimensions of accounting information prepared foruse in managing non‐corporate pastoral entities in pre‐FederationWestern Victoria and the local…

Abstract

Investigates the dimensions of accounting information prepared for use in managing non‐corporate pastoral entities in pre‐Federation Western Victoria and the local, time‐specific environmental factors which shaped these dimensions. Based on examinations of 23 sets of surviving business records prepared during 1836‐1900, provides evidence of the structure and usage of pastoral accounting information in an unregulated financial reporting environment. Draws conclusions about the likely impact of cultural, legal and political, professional, educational, economic and other factors as key explanatory variables. Also argues a case for lost relevance based on the evidence of accounting change in the closing decades of the nineteenth century.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Victoria Knight and Hannah Goodman

This article presents the findings of a survey into the personal safety provisions, services and training for key public service providers and users in Leicester city. The…

Abstract

This article presents the findings of a survey into the personal safety provisions, services and training for key public service providers and users in Leicester city. The article offers some definitions and approaches to personal safety, which illustrates the breadth and extent to which personal safety is understood. The survey highlights perceptions and experiences of personal safety of workers from a range of agencies in the community in Leicester city. The findings suggest that personal safety is important in terms of debates and decisions about occupational health and safety, delivery of public services, diversity, social inclusion and crime and disorder. The article advocates the need to raise the profile of personal safety especially in service provision, services and training.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Alan Marlow

Abstract

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Alan Marlow

Abstract

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Chandranshu Sinha

The dialogic nature of new organization development practices brought a dramatic shift in relation to the way OD has had been practiced in the past. However, contemporary…

Abstract

Purpose

The dialogic nature of new organization development practices brought a dramatic shift in relation to the way OD has had been practiced in the past. However, contemporary literature indicates that OD still has to go a long way if it has to play a central role. The purpose of this paper is to speculate for the concerns being raised about OD practices and propose an interpretive approach to fill in the gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper traces OD’s glorious journey, which began with egalitarian values. This section builds on the dynamics of power and politics which was integral to the OD movement and further reviews and critiques the contributions of new OD approaches that has its foundations in postmodernism and social constructionism. In the second part, the paper discusses the critical perspective and introduces the concept of subaltern to fill in the gaps in new OD approaches. Further, the paper finds a ground to integrate and redefine the boundaries of critical and subaltern studies.

Findings

The paper proposes an interpretive approach for designing and carrying out OD interventions and introduces the concept of critical-subaltern OD. This approach recognizes the importance to engage with the dialectics or contradictions present between (and within) OD interventions. Through this interpretive approach, the author positions critical-subaltern voices as an integral part of OD interventions and change management.

Practical implications

The interpretive approach gives an insight into the unacknowledged and unheard socially constructed realities of change and OD practices for sensemaking. The approach would also be instrumental in enhancing the levels of engagement and productivity in unacknowledged and non-dominant employees.

Originality/value

This paper is a departure from the modern literature of critical management studies and builds on the critical theory on OD. The paper proposes by roping in the benefits of subaltern studies into OD practices. The paper builds ways to include voices of those, who never gain a voice. In brief, toward the end of the paper, the author proposes an interpretive approach and moves toward critical-subaltern OD. Through this interpretive approach, the author positions critical-subaltern voices as an integral part of OD interventions and change management.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Kieran James, Chris Tolliday and Rex Walsh

The purpose of this paper is to review the cancellation of Australia's National Soccer League (NSL) competition and its replacement in 2004 with the corporatist A‐League…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the cancellation of Australia's National Soccer League (NSL) competition and its replacement in 2004 with the corporatist A‐League which is based on the North American model of “one team one city”, no promotion and relegation, and private‐equity clubs. The authors believe that one of the aims of the A‐League and its “ground‐zero” ideology was to institute exclusion of the ethnic clubs that had formed the backbone of the NSL for 30 years.

Design/methodology/approach

Extensive literature search, participant‐observation, one personal interview and two group interviews were employed. People interviewed were the President of the Croatian community's Melbourne Knights Football Club, the Club Secretary of Melbourne Knights, and three leaders of Melbourne Knights’ MCF hooligan firm.

Findings

The authors observe the Football Federation Australia hiding behind the perceived scientific nature and technical veracity of budgeted accounting numbers to set the financial bar too high for the ethnic clubs to find a place in the brave new world that has been called “Modern Football”. However, capitalism creates its own discontents. Online forums and homemade fence banners are the new vehicles for dissent for the supporters of “Old Soccer”.

Originality/value

There is still only a small academic literature on Australian football and most of this has been written by humanities lecturers. The paper offers a business school perspective.

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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