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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Victoria Insley and Daniel Nunan

As online retailing grows in importance there is increasing interest in the online customer experience. The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of gamification…

Abstract

Purpose

As online retailing grows in importance there is increasing interest in the online customer experience. The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of gamification, the use of game mechanics, in enabling consumer engagement with online retailers.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopts a qualitative methodology carrying out 19 in-depth interviews with individuals who are frequent online shoppers.

Findings

Findings support the importance of including game elements to enhance the retail experience. However, data also suggests that without appropriate management customers can subvert gamification strategies to create their own “games” which increases competitive pressure between retailers.

Practical implications

The paper suggests ways in which retailers might more successfully “gamify” their online retail stores and reduce incidences of undesirable customer behaviour.

Originality/value

This paper provides empirical support to the current paucity of research into the role of gamification in the context of the online retail experience.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Liza Hopkins, Glenda Pedwell, Katie Wilson and Prunella Howell-Jay

The purpose of this study was to identify and understand the barriers and enablers to the implementation of youth peer support in a clinical mental health service. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to identify and understand the barriers and enablers to the implementation of youth peer support in a clinical mental health service. The development of a lived experience workforce in mental health is a key component of policy at both the state and the federal level in Australia. Implementing a peer workforce within existing clinical services, however, can be a challenging task. Furthermore, implementing peer support in a youth mental health setting involves a further degree of complexity, involving a degree of care for young people being invited to provide peer support when they may be still early in their own recovery journey.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on a formative evaluation of the beginning stages of implementation of a youth peer workforce within an existing clinical mental health service in Melbourne.

Findings

The project found that it was feasible and beneficial to implement youth peer support; however, significant challenges remain, including lack of appropriate training for young people, uncertainty amongst clinical staff about the boundaries of the peer role and the potential for “tokenism” in the face of slow cultural change across the whole service.

Originality/value

Very little evaluation has yet been undertaken into the effectiveness of implementing peer support in youth mental health services. This paper offers an opportunity to investigate where services may need to identify strengths and address difficulties when undertaking future implementation efforts.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1959

P. Person

IN recent years the bogie type of multi‐wheel undercarriage has been introduced on the medium and heavy range of aircraft. The trend began because of the necessity of…

Abstract

IN recent years the bogie type of multi‐wheel undercarriage has been introduced on the medium and heavy range of aircraft. The trend began because of the necessity of keeping runway loadings to a minimum and the difficulty of stowing a large diameter single wheel in the wing or fuselage during flight. By spreading the main undercarriage ground reaction through two, four or more wheels, existing runways are able to accommodate heavier aircraft, while faster operational flight speeds have resulted in relatively thinner wing sections aggravating the stowage problem of the undercarriage. The interpretation of the bogie into practical undercarriages with their manifold performance duties has led to several types of mechanisms each with distinctive dynamical features. One such mechanism is the semi‐articulated bogie type and its general features have been previously described, The claims made for this undercarriage have been substantiated through several years of successful operational experience. Since this particular arrangement has obvious future applications both as a twin‐ or multi‐wheel version and, as it possesses characteristic dynamical features, it is considered appropriate to place on record the analysis of its landing performance.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1958

WHERE are we going? The aim is to double our standard of living in the next 25 years and, as Sir Alexander Fleck, K.B.E., Chairman of Imperial Chemical Industries Ltd., so…

Abstract

WHERE are we going? The aim is to double our standard of living in the next 25 years and, as Sir Alexander Fleck, K.B.E., Chairman of Imperial Chemical Industries Ltd., so aptly staled recently, ‘The man who knows where he is going is the one who is most likely to arrive.’ One might venture to expand this statement by adding that he is still more likely to arrive if the cluttering debris of inefficient methods and movements are cleared away.

Details

Work Study, vol. 7 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Una Woods

This paper aims to examine the remedies currently available in Ireland to resolve boundary disputes to assess the importance of the role played by adverse possession in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the remedies currently available in Ireland to resolve boundary disputes to assess the importance of the role played by adverse possession in this context. It also examines the potential impact of certain reforms in this area of law.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology is primarily doctrinal, although a comparative approach is adopted for the purposes of assessing whether certain lessons can be learned from recent reforms to the English law on adverse possession and the Australian approach to resolving boundary disputes, which relies heavily on mistaken improver and building encroachment legislation.

Findings

This paper demonstrates how the current law leaves certain mistaken improvers or encroachers on neighbouring land without a remedy, as they cannot rely on the doctrine of proprietary estoppel or adverse possession. If Ireland decides to replicate the English good faith requirement in relation to adverse possession of boundary land, the remedial vacuum facing these mistaken improvers or encroaching builders will become more pronounced. It is submitted that any such reform should be supplemented by the introduction of legislation akin to that operating in Australia which would facilitate the consideration of a broad range of factors and provide for flexible remedies to resolve such difficulties. It is also submitted that the legislation imposing such a good faith requirement should be carefully drafted to avoid the potential interpretative difficulties associated with the English reforms.

Originality/value

Boundary disputes are an unfortunate fact of life. The prevalence of boundary disputes and high costs associated with boundary litigation makes this review and critique of the current law and potential reforms highly relevant.

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

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Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2013

Fiona McCormack

Purpose – The chapter compares gift and market exchange in Hawaiian and New Zealand fisheries.Methodology/approach – The chapter draws upon a combination of original…

Abstract

Purpose – The chapter compares gift and market exchange in Hawaiian and New Zealand fisheries.Methodology/approach – The chapter draws upon a combination of original ethnographic fieldwork and literature pertaining to fisheries in both New Zealand and Hawaii.Findings – The privatization of fishing rights in New Zealand, in conjunction with a social policy directed toward Maori addressing colonial dispossession, has resulted in the dominance of market exchange, the creation of a purified version of indigenous gift exchange, and the attempted elimination of any hybrid activities. This has not been a positive outcome for the majority of coastal Maori. Fisheries development in Hawai’i has taken a different path. The flexibility that inheres in Hawaiian fisheries enables ongoing participation in both gift and cash economies.Originality/value – Over the last few decades western economies have witnessed a rapid extension of market approaches to many commonly owned environmental goods, a movement which has been entrenched as global policy orthodoxy. The social consequences of this development have been under researched. This chapter challenges the neoliberal model of using market mechanisms and property rights as “the way to do” natural resource management.

Details

Engaging with Capitalism: Cases from Oceania
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-542-5

Keywords

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