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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Victoria Brooks

The purpose of this paper is to set the groundwork for a new methodological movement. The author claims that methodological strategies must take as their object the laws…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set the groundwork for a new methodological movement. The author claims that methodological strategies must take as their object the laws with found sexual identity, or rather should be “fucking with” law by creatively confronting, occupying and agitating limiting ethical frameworks that control access to the field. The movement is ethnographic, since it finds research ethics and “straight” academic space to be where these rules are the most harmful in limiting access to the field, for female researchers, in particular.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach (but also to some extent the target) is on Deleuzian and post-Deleuzian’s philosophy, whose theoretical leaps have sought to shift and cause slippage in laws of sexual identity. However, when these laws are tested by researchers proposing to access the field, specifically ethnographically and autoethnographically, it is clear they have not “slipped” at all. This is clear through the questions raised by ethics committees. Fucking law, therefore, becomes a methodological movement intimately connecting ethical agendas and sex as an encounter in the field.

Findings

The author claims that the methodological movement of “fucking” law captures, or at least attempts to capture, the slipperiness of the body, the encounter, the research project and sex itself. The movement, “fucking law”, is essential in agitating and occupying the limiting institutional research agendas and their ethical frameworks.

Practical implications

The implications of “fucking law” will be necessarily unpredictable, but the main practical and connected social implication is questioning as to why more women are not practically questioning arguably one of the biggest questions: the ethics of sexuality. Fucking law argues for the questioning of these laws with bodies, and experimenting with philosophies which underpin and create institutional ethical rules.

Originality/value

This is the first work of its kind by a female autoethnographer challenging the ethics of sexuality, arising from a participatory field project. It also evaluates and confronts the ethics of the field as a whole: from the researcher herself, to her academic environment and sexual life, to the field itself and the writing up of the project.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2019

Lee Jerome and Victoria Brook

In 2016, the National Standards for School-based Initial Teacher Training (ITT) Mentors were published in England. The purpose of this paper is to critique these standards…

Abstract

Purpose

In 2016, the National Standards for School-based Initial Teacher Training (ITT) Mentors were published in England. The purpose of this paper is to critique these standards through a comparison of how others have framed and defined the role of the mentor, drawing on equivalent standards already published in nursing (2008) and social work (2012).

Design/methodology/approach

An analysis of three sets of professional standards was conducted by adapting the “constant comparison” approach in which the researchers sought to combine a form of inductive coding with comparison across the texts. This enabled the identification of a number of common themes and omissions across the three sets of standards.

Findings

The analysis revealed the ITT mentor standards provide a comparatively limited account of the role of the mentor, particularly in relation to the process of assessment, the power dynamics between mentors and student teachers, and the school as an institutional site for professional learning.

Originality/value

The study’s originality lies in the inter-professional comparative analysis, which revealed a number of potentially contentious issues not immediately apparent from a close textual analysis of the ITT mentor standards.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Wiriya Chongruksut and Albie Brooks

While a number of studies relating to activity‐based costing (ABC) have been conducted, relatively few have been conducted in the South East Asia region. This paper…

Abstract

While a number of studies relating to activity‐based costing (ABC) have been conducted, relatively few have been conducted in the South East Asia region. This paper reports the results of a survey of firms in Thailand regarding issues associated with ABC adoption and implementation. The study finds that the rate of ABC adoption in Thailand was relatively high (58% of all respondent firms having ABC knowledge and adopting ABC as an idea; 35% of respondents overall) compared with other Asian countries. In particular, firms with greater variation in product complexity, complexity of production service processes and intensity of capital equipment were more likely to adopt ABC. In line with previous studies, top management support was identified as a key criterion influencing the success of ABC.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Book part
Publication date: 8 December 2016

Abstract

Details

The Dark Side of Leadership: Identifying and Overcoming Unethical Practice in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-499-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Hieu Van Nguyen and Albie Brooks

This paper provides empirical evidence relating to the characteristics of firms adopting ABC compared to those not adopting ABC. The empirical evidence is based on…

Abstract

This paper provides empirical evidence relating to the characteristics of firms adopting ABC compared to those not adopting ABC. The empirical evidence is based on responses received from 120 manufacturing companies. The characteristics explored relate to what are referred to as firm characteristic and business environment variables which are defined as those relating to: cost structure, production complexity, production diversity, firm size and the level of competitive intensity. Five hypotheses are developed from a discussion of the literature relating to adoption issues. The results suggest that there would appear to be significant differences between firms adopting ABC and those not adopting ABC in relation to production complexity, firm size and level of competitive intensity, while there would appear to be no significant differences in relation to the proportion of overhead costs in total manufacturing costs and production diversity.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Book part
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Anna Melinda and Ratna Wardhani

With the increasing understanding of stakeholders on sustainability aspects for the business, companies are nowadays paying more attention to environmental and social…

Abstract

With the increasing understanding of stakeholders on sustainability aspects for the business, companies are nowadays paying more attention to environmental and social issues. This study aims to examine the relationship between Environmental, Social, Governance (ESG) Index and firms’ value. Moreover, this study also examines how the controversy score influences the company’s value. The authors employ a dataset of 1.356 companies from 22 countries in Asia which representing the Asian market from 2014 to 2018. This study shows that ESG index score and controversy score are statistically significant, affecting the firms’ value, measured by Tobin’s Q. From the individual tests, the findings of this study indicate that ESG-environmental, ESG-social, and ESG-governance, individually affect the firms’ value. This study suggests that providing disclosure on ESG aspects is essential, not only to increase company value but also to show the company resilience and sustainability. On the other hand, ESG controversy score surprisingly indicates a positive relationship with the company value. The result implies that controversies provide a positive signal to the investor because controversies could provide a signal to the public of companies’ willingness to have transparency and accountability.

Details

Advanced Issues in the Economics of Emerging Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-578-9

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2010

Craig Campbell

The tensions of the Cold War focussed attention on the role that universities might play through their science and technology expertise and research. At the same time the…

Abstract

The tensions of the Cold War focussed attention on the role that universities might play through their science and technology expertise and research. At the same time the United States needed to secure its allies as the threat of a new European war, and the actuality of the Korean War, developed in the late 1940s and 1950s. These pressures contributed to the Carnegie Corporation’s assessment that the time was ripe to send a ‘key man’ to Australia and New Zealand.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Hugh Burkitt

The purpose of this paper is to share – and provide context for – eight recommendations about responsible drinks marketing, which were developed by an Expert Committee led…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share – and provide context for – eight recommendations about responsible drinks marketing, which were developed by an Expert Committee led by the author in 2006. The International Center for Alcohol Policies (ICAP) and its sponsors have long recognized the importance of maintaining integrity and high standards in the marketing of beverage alcohol products.

Design/methodology/approach

An Expert Committee was convened from 30 May to 2 June, 2006, with participants who were selected from each region of the world, representing the perspectives of marketers, regulators, beverage alcohol producers, researchers and consumers. The result of their work together was a report entitled, Responsible Drinks Marketing: Shared Rights and Responsibilities, which included the eight recommendations presented in this article.

Findings

Recommendations focus on three distinct contexts: understanding perspectives on responsible drinks marketing; unifying principles for marketing worldwide; and best practice strategies for marketers.

Practical implications

Alcohol beverages have been an integral part of societies for thousands of years. While consumption patterns vary dramatically in different countries and societies, the marketing of beverage alcohol carries significant responsibilities.

Originality/value

Based on the agreed‐upon premise that adults who choose to drink should be free to enjoy alcohol beverages safely and responsibly, the author and Expert Committee drew upon resources that included United Nations Guidelines for Consumer Protection.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1944

If it is a fraud to dye an unripe orange to make it look ripe, why should it be permissible to dye winter butter to make it look like summer butter?”, he says. Or one…

Abstract

If it is a fraud to dye an unripe orange to make it look ripe, why should it be permissible to dye winter butter to make it look like summer butter?”, he says. Or one might add, to dye a biscuit brown to imply the presence of chocolate or to colour a cake yellow to simulate the addition of eggs? Our third heading is, What? What colouring matters should be allowed, and upon what conditions? Great Britain is the only leading country which has not a legal schedule of permitted colours. In this country any colouring agent may be added to food, except compounds of antimony, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, lead and zinc. Gamboge, picric acid, victoria yellow, manchester yellow, aurantia and aurine are also prohibited. The addition, however, of any other colouring agent which is injurious to health would be an offence under the Food and Drugs Act. Other countries, including the United States of America, France, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Italy, Spain, Sweden and Denmark have drawn up lists of permissible colours. And so the question arises—is it preferable to draw up a list of permissible colours or one of prohibited colours? It is obvious that if only certain colours are prohibited the remainder may be legally employed so long as they are not injurious to health. Thus a colouring agent may be used for a considerable time before it is proved to be injurious, whereas, if only‐certain colouring agents which have been previously proved to be non‐injurious were permitted, this risk of possible danger to health would be avoided. There is no doubt that in many cases proof of injury to the health of the human being is difficult to obtain. Much of the work that has been carried out to establish whether a particular dye is harmless or not has involved the use of dogs as test subjects. This does not appear to be a very satisfactory method of testing, for obviously dogs may react very differently from human beings towards chemicals. A dog's digestive powers are stronger than those of humans. No one would think of suggesting that bones are suitable food for humans just because dogs love them! Matta found that the capacity to depress the human digestion is possessed not only by poisonous dyes but also by dyes which he had proved to be non‐poisonous to animals. In bacteriology the addition of very small amounts of certain dyes to the culture medium will retard the growth of particular organisms and therefore it would seem possible that some dyes might adversely affect the action of enzymes in the body. So it would seem of importance that, if possible, all colouring matters, before being permitted to be used in food, should be proved by a competent authority to be harmless to human beings. If the effects of colouring matters upon the human digestive processes cannot be easily carried out in the body then it might be possible to perform such tests in vitro, using artificial gastric juice. It may be argued that the proportion of colouring matter added to food, ranging from about 1 part in 2,000 to about 1 part in 300,000, is so small that any particular colouring agent would need to be a deadly poison before any appreciable injurious effect upon health would occur. This argument does not, however, take into account the possible injurious effects which may be caused by the frequent ingestion of colouring matters which may have but mild toxic properties. It is known, for instance, that many synthetic colours have marked antiseptic properties even in highly diluted solutions, and therefore they may adversely affect the digestive processes. In any case, surely it would be wiser to eliminate all risks by requiring that official physiological tests should be carried out upon colouring matters before they are permitted to be used in food. One has to safeguard not only the healthy person but also the very young, the old and those who are of a delicate constitution. A harmless colour has been defined in Canada as one “which will not retard digestion nor have special physiological effects when consumed in quantities corresponding to 2 grains per day per adult.” The Departmental Committee in its report on “The use of preservatives and colouring matters in food,” published in 1924, stated that “It appears to us that definite evidence from direct experiments should be obtained as to the harmlessness of a dye before its use should be permitted in food. We have therefore come to the conclusion that a list of permitted colours should be prepared and that no colours other than those in such a list should be allowed to be used in the preparation of food. The list should, in our opinion, be prepared by the Minister of Health and issued by him, provision being made for the consideration of claims advanced by traders for the recognition and approval of additional colours on satisfactory evidence of harmlessness. We do not think that action such as this should seriously embarrass manufacturing interests, or is a course on which it is unreasonable, in view of the importance of the subject, to insist.” Yet, in spite of these recommendations of the Committee, no list of permitted colours was passed into law, and one wonders why. One argument against the drawing up of a list of prohibited colours is that even if a non‐prohibited colour is proved to the satisfaction of a given Court to be injurious to health that decision is not binding on other Courts and so there may be a lack of uniformity. A certain colour may be permitted in one town and prohibited in the next, which fact might add to the difficulties of the large scale manufacturer whose products are sold over a wide area. The leading manufacturers of dyes for use in food no doubt exercise great care in their preparation and such products are normally free from objectionable impurities, but it is possible that other dyestuff manufacturers are not so particular concerning the purity of their products. For instance, about 1938 a firm was fined for selling “Damson Blue” containing 540 parts of lead per million. Therefore it would seem necessary that some official control over the dyes that are sold for use in food should be introduced. The manufacture of some dyes involves complicated processes, and it is stated that in the production of one particular colour over 100 different chemicals are used and thirty different reactions, occupying several weeks, must be carried out before the finished colour is produced.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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