Search results

1 – 10 of 12
Article
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Victoria Anne Hatton and Ming Xuan Lee

Autism spectrum condition (ASC) is a lifelong developmental condition. According to research, it is recommended that those diagnosed with ASC should be offered post-diagnosis…

Abstract

Purpose

Autism spectrum condition (ASC) is a lifelong developmental condition. According to research, it is recommended that those diagnosed with ASC should be offered post-diagnosis support to explore their diagnosis (Punshow, Skirrow and Murphy, 2009). The ASC Diagnostic Assessment Service at Gloucestershire Health Care (GHC) NHS Foundation Trust offers an assessment service to adults (18+) located within Gloucestershire. All those who receive a diagnosis are then invited to a 7-week post-diagnostic group facilitated by the multidisciplinary team. This service evaluation aimed to evaluate the aforementioned group so that it can be improved upon and thus provide a better service for future clients.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 14 participants (6 males, 8 females) were interviewed for the purpose of this evaluation following their attendance at these groups.

Findings

The interview transcripts then underwent thematic analysis with four themes identified; “Autistic Community”, “Experience of Being Part of an Online Group”, “Opportunity for Consolidation”, and “Design Considerations and Improvements”. Further sub-themes were also identified. Overall, the service evaluation identified that the group provided a platform for sharing experiences and gaining a sense of belonging. It also highlighted that individuals have different preferences for whether groups should be facilitated online or face-to-face, and also different preferences for the duration of sessions. Further analysis also revealed the suggestion that the final session, for family and friends, should be optional so that those without a support network, do not need to attend as this caused unease in some. Further findings were also identified.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, existing articles have only focused on the evaluation of the availability of post-diagnostic provision and autistic individuals’ general impression of it rather than an in-depth evaluation of a specific type of support.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2018

Victoria Anne Hatton

The purpose of this paper is to present a training package which was delivered to improve staff members’ knowledge and confidence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a training package which was delivered to improve staff members’ knowledge and confidence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and intellectual disabilities (ID).

Design/methodology/approach

The training was facilitated in a locked rehabilitation unit for adult males, many of whom had diagnoses of ASD and/or ID. With all staff receiving an invite, 25 attended which was the majority of the staff team. This included staff from housekeeping, nursing and catering.

Findings

To evaluate the effectiveness of the training, a survey and short assessment was administered before and after training. This revealed an improvement in both perceived knowledge and confidence of ASD and ID, as well as actual knowledge. Follow-up interviews also revealed some evidence of sustained learning and practice changes.

Research limitations/implications

Based on these findings, it is recommended that further face-to-face training is delivered at this locked rehabilitation unit to further improve professional practice.

Originality/value

This paper provides value to other inpatient settings as it highlights to practitioners how face-to-face training can significantly improve staff members knowledge and confidence of developmental disorders.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1949

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing fields…

Abstract

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing fields but who have a common interest in the means by which information may be collected and disseminated to the greatest advantage. Lists of its members have, therefore, a more than ordinary value since they present, in miniature, a cross‐section of institutions and individuals who share this special interest.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1957

IN view of the ever‐increasing application of time and motion study techniques in this country it is difficult to understand why so few manufacturers of time and labour‐saving…

Abstract

IN view of the ever‐increasing application of time and motion study techniques in this country it is difficult to understand why so few manufacturers of time and labour‐saving equipment advertise the very items required by work study engineers.

Details

Work Study, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1986

MELINDA RILEY, BRIAN LANTZ, MIKE CORNFORD, TONY WARSHAW, JANE LITTLE, EDWIN FLEMING, ALLAN BUNCH and WILFRED ASHWORTH

The idea for this hugely successful event at the Crucible Theatre on 7 June, came first from the pages of New Library World, believe it or not. Reading one of Jane Little's…

Abstract

The idea for this hugely successful event at the Crucible Theatre on 7 June, came first from the pages of New Library World, believe it or not. Reading one of Jane Little's articles advertising Feminist Book Fortnight, I noticed that there was not going to be a feminist book fair in this country this year, and that the main fair was to be in Oslo. It seemed an ideal opportunity to alter Sheffield's image as the macho snooker playing capital of the North and the idea for the First Sheffield Women's Book Fair was born.

Details

New Library World, vol. 87 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1904

DURING the past six years, a considerable amount of progress has been made, in certain directions, towards improving methods of library work. The improvements introduced have…

Abstract

DURING the past six years, a considerable amount of progress has been made, in certain directions, towards improving methods of library work. The improvements introduced have mostly come from the younger generation of English librarians, and it must also be added that this enthusiasm for betterment has been confined to a very small circle of young librarians. The majority of British librarians have apparently remained untouched by the movement towards more perfect methods compassed by their fellows, and it is doubtful if, in spite of the remarkably good work accomplished by a few “earnest men in various parts of the country, there is not, on the whole, a great preponderance of professional apathy in regard to burning questions of librarianship. The proof of this is only too obvious. Anyone who has watched the dwindling attendances at monthly Library Association meetings must have been struck by the fact as indicative of weakness or defectiveness somewhere. No professional association, with professional interests at stake, is going to languish, and practically sputter out, unless the members are bored, or indifferent, or in some way apathetic. For nearly four years, the interest in the Library Association meetings has been declining, and although the annual gatherings have been more or less successful, thanks to the energy of the provincial members, it must be remembered that the monthly meetings have been very badly attended, although their interest has been as great as heretofore—which, however, is not saying much. Recently, this lack of interest has assumed the form of a kind of epidemic rot, which has attacked other associations as well as the parent one. We hear of one kindred society having entirely suspended its meetings for months, while we read of another which can hardly get an attendance large enough to carry a vote of thanks to the speaker. When we hear it stated that the interest in the Library Association meetings is so languid that even the readers of papers do not trouble to appear, and that about half‐a‐dozen members is all that can be mustered on some occasions, it must be obvious to all that there is something radically wrong. We have heard it suggested that the Library Association meetings take place on an impossible day, and that the notice sent out is insufficient because only published in the Record, which nobody reads ! There may be an element of truth in these suggestions, but hardly enough to account for the all‐round apathy which undoubtedly exists. The stimulus derived from the Leeds meeting has apparently evaporated already, and beyond a decidedly more healthy response to the examination scheme of the Association, it is hard to understand in which direction activity of any kind exists. Comparing the professional work on this side of the Atlantic with that of the United States, it must be confessed that the comparison is very unfavourable to the British case. In America there are dozens of flourishing associations, counting their membership in thousands, while here, there are some half‐dozen associations, including the Library Association itself, which can only muster among them a little more than five hundred members. This is a poor record when one considers the possibilities, and if librarianship is to become a more powerful factor in the educational development of the future, it is evident that a strong effort must be made all round to double the membership of all the existing associations to begin with, and then to interest and retain the members who join by means of live meetings, publications, and other enterprizes. It will not suffice to rest on present achievements if librarianship is to be recognized as a greater power in the State than hitherto, and for this reason it behoves those librarians who have any “go” left in them, to try and pull up the existing machinery to a higher state of efficiency.

Details

New Library World, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1981

25 July to 1 August 1982. Unioni Naisasialiitti Suomessary, The Finnish women's organisation, will be hosting the 26th Triennial Congress of the International Alliance of Women in…

Abstract

25 July to 1 August 1982. Unioni Naisasialiitti Suomessary, The Finnish women's organisation, will be hosting the 26th Triennial Congress of the International Alliance of Women in Helsinki. The Alliance is one of the leading Non‐Governmental Organisations recognised by the United Nations and its agencies as representing women's interests, and has affiliated organisations in a large number of both developed and developing countries. The theme of the 1982 Congress is “Employment Patterns in the Eighties”. Enquiries to IAW, P.O. Box 355, Valetta, Malta or to Isari Mattila, UNIONI, Bulevard: 11 Al,00120 Helsinki, Finland.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Gordon Bowker

What can the schools or Youth Employment Service do for the ambitious child from a poor background? All the sociological evidence suggests that a working‐class background is still…

Abstract

What can the schools or Youth Employment Service do for the ambitious child from a poor background? All the sociological evidence suggests that a working‐class background is still a formidable obstacle to upward social mobility. The children seem as aware of this as the social scientists. A London Youth Employment Officer told me that high ambitions expressed by school‐leavers on written questionnaires are almost always replaced by down‐to‐earth job requests in interviews.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 16 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Abstract

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

1 – 10 of 12