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Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2016

Victor P. Seidel, Kelley A. Packalen and Siobhan O’Mahony

Scholars have studied how entrepreneurs acquire resources but have not examined how resources may be bundled with constraints, which can threaten entrepreneurial autonomy…

Abstract

Scholars have studied how entrepreneurs acquire resources but have not examined how resources may be bundled with constraints, which can threaten entrepreneurial autonomy. Organizational sponsors, such as incubators and accelerators, provide entrepreneurs with resources, but how do entrepreneurs sustain autonomy while seeking resources and support? We studied five entrepreneurial firms in a business incubator over a six-month period. While benefitting from incubator resources, entrepreneurs also experienced unexpected constraints, including mentor role conflict, gatekeeper control, and affiliation dissonance. By showing how entrepreneurs unbundled the incubator’s resources from constraints, we explain how entrepreneurs manage the tension between acquiring resources and preserving autonomy.

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Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2016

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The Structuring of Work in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-436-5

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Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2003

John Michael Montias

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Economics of Art and Culture Invited Papers at the 12th International Conference of the Association of Cultural Economics International
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44450-995-6

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2009

Robert J. Antonio

During the great post–World War II economic expansion, modernization theorists held that the new American capitalism balanced mass production and mass consumption, meshed…

Abstract

During the great post–World War II economic expansion, modernization theorists held that the new American capitalism balanced mass production and mass consumption, meshed profitability with labor's interests, and ended class conflict. They thought that Keynesian policies insured a near full-employment, low-inflation, continuous growth economy. They viewed the United States as the “new lead society,” eliminating industrial capitalism's backward features and progressing toward modernity's penultimate “postindustrial” stage.7 Many Americans believed that the ideal of “consumer freedom,” forged early in the century, had been widely realized and epitomized American democracy's superiority to communism.8 However, critics held that the new capitalism did not solve all of classical capitalism's problems (e.g., poverty) and that much increased consumption generated new types of cultural and political problems. John Kenneth Galbraith argued that mainstream economists assumed that human nature dictates an unlimited “urgency of wants,” naturalizing ever increasing production and consumption and precluding the distinction of goods required to meet basic needs from those that stoke wasteful, destructive appetites. In his view, mainstream economists’ individualistic, acquisitive presuppositions crown consumers sovereign and obscure cultural forces, especially advertising, that generate and channel desire and elevate possessions and consumption into the prime measures of self-worth. Galbraith held that production's “paramount position” and related “imperatives of consumer demand” create dependence on economic growth and generate new imbalances and insecurities.9 Harsher critics held that the consumer culture blinded middle-class Americans to injustice, despotic bureaucracy, and drudge work (e.g., Mills, 1961; Marcuse, 1964). But even these radical critics implied that postwar capitalism unlocked the secret of sustained economic growth.

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Nature, Knowledge and Negation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-606-9

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The Aging Workforce Handbook
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-448-8

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Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2016

Michel Anteby

Business schools offer a unique window into the making of corporate morals since they bring together future executives at formative moments in their professional lives…

Abstract

Business schools offer a unique window into the making of corporate morals since they bring together future executives at formative moments in their professional lives. This paper relies on an analysis of faculty’s teaching tasks at the Harvard Business School to better understand the making of corporate morals. More specifically, it builds on a coding of teaching notes used by faculty members to highlight the importance of silence in promoting a form of moral relativism. This moral relativism constitutes, I argue, a powerful ideology – one that primes business leaders not to vilify any moral stand. In such a context, almost anything can be labeled “moral” and few behaviors can be deemed “immoral.”

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The Structuring of Work in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-436-5

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Meri Jalonen, Päivi Ristimäki, Hanna Toiviainen, Anneli Pulkkis and Mika Lohtander

This paper aims to analyze learning in organizational transformations by focusing on concept-level tensions faced in two young companies, which were searching for a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze learning in organizational transformations by focusing on concept-level tensions faced in two young companies, which were searching for a reorientation of activity with a production network between innovative product development and efficient mass production.

Design/methodology/approach

An intervention-based research project was carried out with two manufacturing companies. The data originate from workshops, whose aim was to identify learning needs based on the discussion of practices of networked production. Concept-level learning is analyzed by examining the dynamic relationships between production concepts and product concepts.

Findings

The most influential concept-level tension stemmed from the co-existence of two production concepts, product development and mass production, which manifested as ambiguity about proper actions in the production network. Other focal tensions were identified between the production and product concepts and within the companies’ network relationships. The dominance of the mass production concept restricted the envisioning of new modes of collaboration and mutual learning in the production network.

Research limitations/implications

The workshop participants did not include representatives from the case companies’ production network. Nevertheless, researchers brought the network partners’ conceptions into the workshop discussion through the presented mirror data.

Practical implications

Companies striving to develop novel production concepts that call for continuous collaboration with customers and suppliers need forums for mutual learning to create solutions to concept-level tensions.

Originality/value

Companies may develop two production concepts over lengthy periods. The tensions that manifest due to incoherent guiding logics may be overcome by engaging in incremental and expansive concept-level learning, directed at the identification of relationships between production and product concepts.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2003

Klaus Mladek

The figure of the “Kafkaesque” in law serves often as a stand-in for something like “perverted justice” and ranks prominently among the legal profession as a whole. But we…

Abstract

The figure of the “Kafkaesque” in law serves often as a stand-in for something like “perverted justice” and ranks prominently among the legal profession as a whole. But we should not soothe ourselves with such obvious clichés surrounding the “Kafkaesque,” rather we must continue to pursue the disturbing challenge Kafka poses for the analysis of the law. It is clear that Kafka’s texts hit a certain nerve of modern law that reaches well beyond these familiar punchlines. It is the task of this article to uncover some of the reasons why Kafka strikes such a strong cord with both legal scholars and people outside of academia alike.

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Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-252-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1955

Reports that have reached us of the installation of Sir Philip R. Morris as President of the Library Association on January 28th assure us of the contribution he may make…

Abstract

Reports that have reached us of the installation of Sir Philip R. Morris as President of the Library Association on January 28th assure us of the contribution he may make to the Association. As the retiring President, Mr. Oldman said, and as we know, his main interest has always been education and, as the Association has many projects in that field and some problems yet unsolved, he welcomed Sir Philip especially in that direction; but our new President has much experience of libraries in spite of his disclaimer of qualifications in our direction. He is a Carnegie Trustee and, unofficially, he connects us again with the body to which our profession owes so much and, as for lack of experience, one who has been Director of Education for Kent and therefore the ultimate official chief of the great County Library system there, cannot lack it. From what we hear of this speech—which we hope will be published in its complete but all too short length in the L.A. Record—we look ahead with confident pleasure to the Address he will give us at the Southport Conference in September.

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New Library World, vol. 56 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Victor Immink, Marcel Kornelis and Ellen Van Kleef

Snacks at work are often of poor dietary quality. The main objective of the current study is to examine the effect of making vegetable snacks available at workplace…

Abstract

Purpose

Snacks at work are often of poor dietary quality. The main objective of the current study is to examine the effect of making vegetable snacks available at workplace meetings on consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

In three between-subjects field experiments conducted at a hospital and three ministries in the Netherlands, with meeting as the unit of condition assignment, attendees were exposed to an assortment of vegetables, varying in vegetable variety and presence of promotional leaflet in study 1 (N = 136 meetings), serving container in study 2 (N = 88 meetings) and additional presence of cookies in study 3 (N = 88 meetings). Consumption of vegetables and cookies was measured at meeting level to assess grams consumed per person.

Findings

Across the three studies, average consumption per meeting attendee was 74 g (SD = 43) for study 1; 78 g (SD = 43) for study 2 and 87 g (SD = 35) for study 3. In the first study, manipulation of perceived variety and information leaflets did not affect intake. In the second study, significantly more vegetables were eaten when they were offered in single sized portions (M = 97 g, SD = 45) versus in a shared multiple portions bowl (63 g, SD = 38) (p < 0.001). In the third study, no effect was found of the additional availability of cookies on vegetable consumption during the meeting.

Practical implications

The present studies show how availability of vegetables at unconventional occasions makes meeting attendants consume considerable portions of vegetables on average. As such, offering healthy snacks at the workplace may be a valuable part of workplace health promotion programs and positively change the “office cake culture”.

Originality/value

Vegetable intake is less than recommended in many countries worldwide. Many snacking occasions are at work, which makes office meetings a potential consumption occasion to encourage vegetable intake. Hence, the aim of this study is to examine whether free availability of vegetable snacks during meetings contributes to their consumption among meeting attendees and under what conditions consumption is optimal.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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