Search results

1 – 10 of 36
Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Victor Owusu, Enoch Owusu-Sekyere, Emmanuel Donkor, Nana Ama Darkwaah and Derrick Adomako-Boateng Jr

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate consumers’ willingness to pay (WTP) for composite flour bread produced with a blend of 15-40 per cent cassava flour blended with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate consumers’ willingness to pay (WTP) for composite flour bread produced with a blend of 15-40 per cent cassava flour blended with wheat flour in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on interviews with 350 consumers in the Ashanti and Eastern Regions of Ghana to assess their awareness, perceptions and WTP for cassava-wheat composite bread. From these consumer interviews, a hedonic regression model was applied to evaluate consumers’ WTP for various attributes of composite flour bread. Price-related and health-related perceptions of consumers on cassava-wheat composite bread were investigated with perception indices. Multi-attribute preference-based contingent ratings that rate product attributes in terms of importance to consumers was employed. The implicit prices of the product attributes representing the contribution of the product attributes to the WTP amount were also computed.

Findings

The paper finds that consumers who are aware of cassava-blended flour bread and who like its taste and texture are willing to pay more than consumers who are unaware. This leads to a policy recommendation advocating increased advertising of the economic and nutritional benefits of cassava-wheat blended composite flour bread.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies should explore the choice experiments to examine preferences for the food product.

Originality/value

This paper evaluates consumers’ WTP for composite flour bread produced with a blend of 15-40 per cent cassava flour and wheat flour. Given widespread reliance on imported wheat flour and the simultaneously large volumes of locally available cassava, it is important to consider opportunities for import substitution (and possible cost reduction for consumers) of blended flour products such as cassava-wheat composite flours. Nigeria has imposed a 10 per cent blending requirement for this reason. Ghana has taken important measures recently for the development of high-quality cassava flour, and so research on its potential and actual uptake is welcomed and highly relevant to food security and agribusiness development.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Victor Owusu-Nantwi and Gloria Owusu-Nantwi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of corruption and shadow economy on public debt in 51 African countries. In addition, the study explores the causal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of corruption and shadow economy on public debt in 51 African countries. In addition, the study explores the causal linkage between corruption, shadow economy and public debt.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs vector error correction model and Kao cointegration test to examine the long-run relationship between corruption, shadow economy and public debt in Africa.

Findings

The study finds a positive and statistically significant relationship between corruption and public debt. Further, the study reports a positive and statistically significant effect of shadow economy on public debt. In the short run, the study finds a unidirectional causal relationship between corruption, shadow economy and public debt with the direction of causality running from corruption and shadow economy to public debt, respectively.

Practical implications

This study recommends that countries should pursue policies and programs that would provide resources to agencies tasked with the responsibility of fighting corruption. This would ensure that countries have effective institutions that curb vulnerabilities to corruption and reduce the size of the shadow economy and public debt.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by showing how corruption and shadow economy affects public debts of African countries. To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first attempt to examine this relationship in the context of Africa.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Victor Owusu, Awudu Abdulai and Williams Ali

This article analyzes farmers' preferences for different nonindexed crop insurance alternatives, using discrete choice experiment data on cocoa farmers from southern…

Abstract

Purpose

This article analyzes farmers' preferences for different nonindexed crop insurance alternatives, using discrete choice experiment data on cocoa farmers from southern Ghana. We examine farmers' attendance to attributes by comparing self-reported attribute nonattendance (ANA) to the behavior inferred from the choices.

Design/methodology/approach

We utilize the latent class endogenous attribute attendance (EAA) model to address potential endogeneity by jointly modelling farmers' attribute processing strategies with their choice of attributes of the insurance products.

Findings

The results show that premium levels, mode and length of indemnity payouts tend to influence farmers' preferences for crop insurance products. The findings also reveal that credit-constrained farmers attend more to premium and payment mode attributes of the crop insurance products and that credit-constrained farmers tend to exhibit lower willingness-to-pay estimates for the crop insurance attributes.

Research limitations/implications

The findings from the study suggest that credit constraints do not only limit input use, but also tend to have statistically significant impact on farmers' cocoa insurance participation decisions.

Originality/value

The study examines the impact of credit constraints on farmers' crop insurance preferences while accounting for ANA.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2018

Victor Owusu-Nantwi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of institutional quality on foreign direct investment (FDI) flows in South America.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of institutional quality on foreign direct investment (FDI) flows in South America.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses two-stage least squares (2SLS) and fixed effect ordinary least squares regression analyses to examine the relationship between institutional quality and FDI in South America.

Findings

The study finds a significant positive relationship between institutional quality index and FDI. This implies that improvements in the institutional quality relate to increases in the flow of FDI to South America. Domestic capital, GDP per capita growth, and trade positively relate to FDI. However, the coefficient of trade is not significant. This implies that increases in these variables relate to increases in FDI flows to South America.

Practical implications

The study recommends that quality of institutions matter to the flow of FDI and therefore, efficient institutional reforms should be a priority for policymakers as this creates a conducive investment environment to attract FDI in South America. Further, policies that are focused on promoting competition, open market, and effective non-corrupt public institution as well as open and transparent legal and regulatory regimes, and effective delivery of government services should be the priority of policymakers in South America (Mishra and Daly, 2007).

Originality/value

The study uses a single measure of institutional quality based on a broad set of institutional indicators. This broad measure of institutional quality differs from the available studies that mainly focused on single aspects of institutional quality, that is, either corruption, governance, or political risk.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2019

Victor Owusu-Nantwi and Christopher Erickson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of foreign direct investment (FDI) on economic growth in countries in South America. Additionally, the study…

1198

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of foreign direct investment (FDI) on economic growth in countries in South America. Additionally, the study explores the causal linkage between FDI and growth in the region.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs Pedroni’s cointegration test to examine the long-run relationship between FDI and economic growth in South America. Further, the study employs the vector error correction model (VECM) to examine the long-run relationship, and the causal nexus between FDI and economic growth in South America for the period 1980–2015.

Findings

The Pedroni cointegration test establishes a long-run relationship between FDI and economic growth in a panel of ten countries in South America. The long-run estimates of the study find a significant positive impact of FDI on economic growth in the region. The VECM results find a short-run bidirectional causality between FDI and economic growth. The error-term is negative and significant. This indicates the presence of long-run equilibrium relationship among the variables.

Practical implications

Countries in South America should adopt policies that would substantially enlarge FDI inflows to enhance their growth and development.

Originality/value

Numerous studies have examined the impact of FDI on economic growth in the context of Latin America. This study fills a gap in the existing literature by providing an empirical evidence that focuses on South America. This additional perspective could form the basis for the evaluation of the investment policies, and help policymakers to pursue FDI policies that would enhance growth and development in South America.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2022

Augustine Senanu Komla Kukah, De-Graft Owusu-Manu, Edward Badu and David John Edwards

In comparison to other countries, power generation in Sub-Saharan Africa is poor. The demand for power has surged in recent times and continues to increase at a fast rate…

Abstract

Purpose

In comparison to other countries, power generation in Sub-Saharan Africa is poor. The demand for power has surged in recent times and continues to increase at a fast rate. The public–private partnership (PPP) model has been identified as an option to address the challenges in the power sector. The purpose of this research paper is to critically explore the reasons for entering into PPP power projects in Ghana by the public and private parties.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were used to elicit responses from respondents using a two-round Delphi survey. From 60 respondents contacted in round one, 48 responses were obtained, and these 48 respondents further took part in round two. Mean score ranking was used to rank the reasons for entering into PPP power projects, while analysis of variance (ANOVA) was run to test significant difference in perceptions among the respondents.

Findings

From round 2 of the Delphi survey, the significant reasons for public sector entering into PPP power projects were as follows: achieving improved value for money, access to additional capital, increased certainty of projects and greater efficiency of project delivery services. For private sector, most significant reasons were as follows: obtaining of investment support, improvement in private sector’s international image and synergy with public sector. From ANOVA analysis, there were significant different perceptions among some of factors on the respondent profile variables and the reasons for entering into PPP power projects, while other factors did not have significant different perception.

Originality/value

Significant reasons for both public and private sectors identified would be incorporated by the government when PPP policy guidelines and laws are reviewed. This will aid in the effective implementation of PPP for power projects.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2020

Shang Gao, Sui Pheng Low and Sarah Xin Xuan Lee

Due to the fragmented and complex nature of the construction industry, many countries, including Singapore, have progressively encouraged greater collaboration amongst…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to the fragmented and complex nature of the construction industry, many countries, including Singapore, have progressively encouraged greater collaboration amongst major stakeholders in the industry. It is hoped that doing so will result in an increase in the quality of construction projects. Given the long duration of typical construction projects, it is plausible for collaborating parties to develop close and personal relationships. In recent years, corruption cases arising from familiar collaboration have caught the public's attention. This study seeks to better understand familiar collaboration and its adverse impacts on the quality of construction projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed research method was adopted, with a questionnaire survey distributed to 32 respondents representing client and contractors. This was followed by interviews to validate the survey findings.

Findings

The findings suggest that, when there is a lack of surveillance, familiar collaboration is likely to lead to favouritism and dishonesty, which can have an adverse impact on the quality of construction projects. The findings additionally suggest that value for money, conformance to specifications and fitness for purpose are the main aspects of quality that are likely to be adversely affected by corrupt practices bought about by familiar collaboration.

Originality/value

In this paper, these relationships are described using the term familiar collaboration. Strong and intimate relationships of this type may lead to a danger of parties committing corrupt practices. This study is one of the very attempts seek to better understand familiar collaboration and its adverse impacts on the quality of construction projects.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2022

Augustine Senanu Komla Kukah, De-Graft Owusu-Manu, Edward Badu and David John Edwards

Demand for private investment in infrastructure, notably in the power sector remains high, and this is anticipated to expand with the passage of time. Very little research…

Abstract

Purpose

Demand for private investment in infrastructure, notably in the power sector remains high, and this is anticipated to expand with the passage of time. Very little research currently exists on the power sector and specifically the private sector influencing factors (PSIFs) for entering into public–private partnerships (PPPs). The purpose of this study is to explore influencing factors for private sector participation in PPP power projects in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Using purposive and snowball sampling techniques, questionnaires were used to gather responses from experts in the PPP power sector domain in a two-round Delphi survey. Reliability analysis was conducted using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and level of agreement tested using Kendall’s concordance. Mean score ranking, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Chi-square test were the main analysis conducted on the influencing factors.

Findings

The most significant PSIFs were: obtaining of investment support; improvement in private sector’s international image; synergy with public sector; sharing of risks; and gaining of profits. From ANOVA results, all the influencing factors had no significant different perception between the number of years in PPP practice and the motivations for the private sector entering into PPP power projects. Using Chi-square, the association between the variables indicated they were statistically significant.

Practical implications

The findings in this study are significant for multinational power generation firms that seek to enter the Ghanaian energy sector to help fill the generation gap and deficit.

Originality/value

The output of this research contributes to the checklist of influencing factors for private sector participation in PPP power projects and enhances the development of PPP practice.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Augustine Senanu Kukah, Andrew Anafo, Richmond Makafui Kofi Kukah, Andrew Victor Kabenlah Blay Jnr, Dominic Benson Sinsa, Eric Asamoah and David Nartey Korda

Inefficiencies in the power sector resulting from underinvesting and underselling reduce the ability of governments to adequately finance energy projects. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Inefficiencies in the power sector resulting from underinvesting and underselling reduce the ability of governments to adequately finance energy projects. The purpose of this paper is to explore mechanisms of energy financing, benefits and challenges associated with innovative financing of energy infrastructure as well as strategies to improve innovative financing of energy infrastructure.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were used to elicit responses from respondents. Seventy-eight responses were retrieved. Mean score ranking, Kruskal–Wallis test and discriminant validity were the analysis conducted.

Findings

Partial credit guarantee; partial risk guarantee; credit enhancement; and loan guarantees were the significant mechanisms. Production efficiency; reduce pressure on public budgets; access to management expertise; and self-sustainability of infrastructure facilities were the significant benefits. Lack of transparency and adequate data for risk assessment; high up-front cost; heterogeneity, complexity, and presence of a large number of parties; and lack of a clear benchmark for measuring investment performance were the severest challenges. Complete transparency and accountability; political stability and public view on private provision of energy infrastructure services; and macroeconomic environment were the significant strategies.

Practical implications

This study is beneficial to energy sector as the current government of Ghana hints on willingness to involve private sector in management of the power sector.

Originality/value

The novelty of this study is that it is a pioneering study in Ghana on innovative financing of energy infrastructure.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Kwabena G. Boakye, Hong Qin, Charles Blankson, Mark D. Hanna and Victor R. Prybutok

The purpose of this study is to explore the direct and indirect effects of perceived provider professionalism and service recovery in enhancing patient satisfaction in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the direct and indirect effects of perceived provider professionalism and service recovery in enhancing patient satisfaction in a developing country.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a survey method to investigate satisfaction among health-care consumers. This study used data collected from 210 health-care consumers to empirically test the hypotheses via structural equation modeling

Findings

This study found that service recovery has a significant direct effect on patient satisfaction. Though this study did not find perceived provider professionalism to have a direct effect on patient satisfaction, it found an indirect effect in the relationship via service experience. Thus, service experience fully/completely mediates the relationship between perceived provider professionalism and patient satisfaction, while partially mediating the significant relationship between service recovery and patient satisfaction.

Originality/value

The results further underscore the need for health-care organizations in developing countries to focus on mindfully developing operations-oriented strategies that lead to the delivery of memorable service experiences for patients.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 36