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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Vic Penn

A summary of the Retail EFTPoS 90 conference is given. Theconference highlighted many developments over the past 12 months in theprogress of EFTPoS UK, and was…

Abstract

A summary of the Retail EFTPoS 90 conference is given. The conference highlighted many developments over the past 12 months in the progress of EFTPoS UK, and was enthusiastic about its future as a leading payment method system for the country′s retailers. News of other payments was also discussed, including a futuristic look at the smart card on the one hand and an overview of how retailers would benefit from the dismantling of the credit card anti‐competitive agreements on the other. Balancing the discussion about plastic payments, a contribution from Transax Financial Services, the UK′s largest cheque guarantee company, drew attention to the continuing presence of the cheque (still Britain′s second most preferred method of payment after cash) and highlighted the increasing requirement for retailers to be able to accept cheques without the risk of fraud.

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Brian H. Kleiner

Presents a special issue, enlisting the help of the author’s students and colleagues, focusing on age, sex, colour and disability discrimination in America. Breaks the…

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5252

Abstract

Presents a special issue, enlisting the help of the author’s students and colleagues, focusing on age, sex, colour and disability discrimination in America. Breaks the evidence down into manageable chunks, covering: age discrimination in the workplace; discrimination against African‐Americans; sex discrimination in the workplace; same sex sexual harassment; how to investigate and prove disability discrimination; sexual harassment in the military; when the main US job‐discrimination law applies to small companies; how to investigate and prove racial discrimination; developments concerning race discrimination in the workplace; developments concerning the Equal Pay Act; developments concerning discrimination against workers with HIV or AIDS; developments concerning discrimination based on refusal of family care leave; developments concerning discrimination against gay or lesbian employees; developments concerning discrimination based on colour; how to investigate and prove discrimination concerning based on colour; developments concerning the Equal Pay Act; using statistics in employment discrimination cases; race discrimination in the workplace; developments concerning gender discrimination in the workplace; discrimination in Japanese organizations in America; discrimination in the entertainment industry; discrimination in the utility industry; understanding and effectively managing national origin discrimination; how to investigate and prove hiring discrimination based on colour; and, finally, how to investigate sexual harassment in the workplace.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 17 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2003

John D Daniels

This paper highlights the evolvement of international business curricula during the 1990s, with an emphasis on occurrences at IU. Because business students are…

Abstract

This paper highlights the evolvement of international business curricula during the 1990s, with an emphasis on occurrences at IU. Because business students are increasingly entering universities with more international experience and international learning expectations than in the past, business schools must respond with course content changes; however, not all professors feel comfortable in adding substantial international content to their courses. Business schools have responded in three organizational ways – separation, infusion, and diffusion – none of which has been without problems. During the 1990s, IU followed a combination of the first two.

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Leadership in International Business Education and Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-224-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1998

Charquinta J. Mims and Brian H. Kleiner

Looks at the issue of homosexual harassment in the workplace. Defines sexual harassment according to the (US) Equal Employment Opportunity Commission guidelines. Provides…

Abstract

Looks at the issue of homosexual harassment in the workplace. Defines sexual harassment according to the (US) Equal Employment Opportunity Commission guidelines. Provides some background history of traditional sexual harassment in the workplace, extending this, in the 1990s, to also encompass homosexual harassment. Describes what is meant by “quid pro quo” and “hostile working environment” harassment, providing examples of what would constitute unacceptable behaviour. Reports on the findings of some surveys of homosexual harassment in the workplace. Offers some helpful tips for employers to follow to prevent and/or protect against homosexual harassment occurring within their organization.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Elizabeth A. Hoffmann

Sexual harassment law addresses hostile environments by evaluating whether the workplace environment would be considered hostile by a “reasonable woman”. But who is a…

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1344

Abstract

Sexual harassment law addresses hostile environments by evaluating whether the workplace environment would be considered hostile by a “reasonable woman”. But who is a reasonable woman? Defendant‐employers may present one group of women employees as representative “reasonable” women and assert that any of these women’s co‐workers who have had different experiences with regard to sexual harassment are not “reasonable”. However, when male employees categorize various groups of female coworkers differently and, subsequently, treat them differently, the experiences of women from one of these groups would not be indicative of the experiences of women from an other group. This “selective sexual harassment” was present in the workplace I studied: while both groups of women were “reasonable”, they had very different experiences, only one of which might be confirmed by a court as the perspective of “reasonable” women. This article advocates for a version of the “reason ble victim” standard to facilitate a closer analysis of hostile environment sexual harassment suits.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 23 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Brian H. Kleiner

Devotes the entire journal issue to managing human behaviour in US industries, with examples drawn from the airline industry, trading industry, publishing industry, metal…

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11720

Abstract

Devotes the entire journal issue to managing human behaviour in US industries, with examples drawn from the airline industry, trading industry, publishing industry, metal products industry, motor vehicle and parts industry, information technology industry, food industry, the airline industry in a turbulent environment, the automotive sales industry, and specialist retailing industry. Outlines the main features of each industry and the environment in which it is operating. Provides examples, insights and quotes from Chief Executive Officers, managers and employees on their organization’s recipe for success. Mentions the effect technology has had in some industries. Talks about skilled and semi‐skilled workers, worker empowerment and the formation of teams. Addresses also the issue of change and the training that is required to deal with it in different industry sectors. Discusses remuneration packages and incentives offered to motivate employees. Notes the importance of customers in the face of increased competition. Extracts from each industry sector the various human resource practices that companies employ to manage their employees effectively ‐ revealing that there is a wide diversity in approach and what is right for one industry sector would not work in another. Offers some advice for managers, but, overall, fails to summarize what constitutes effective means of managing human behaviour.

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Management Research News, vol. 22 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

BARBARA COHEN and E. BARRINGTON THOMAS

This paper is a report of a study which examined patterns of misbehaviour and punishment in 52 secondary schools within the South Central region of the Education…

Abstract

This paper is a report of a study which examined patterns of misbehaviour and punishment in 52 secondary schools within the South Central region of the Education Department of Victoria, Australia, and considered their significance as indicators of the implicit values endorsed by the school and as measures of one aspect of school climate. The results of a factor analysis revealed the existence of four factors, reflecting differing values emphases within schools. A further statistical analysis led to the determination of four categories of climate, designated as “controlled”, “conflictual”, “libertarian” and “autonomous”. The characteristics of each school system were then considered in relation to these groupings.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2005

Vick Gupta and Brian H. Kleiner

Employees are an integral part of an organisation. They are important assets for a company. Employees with their hard work and sincerity can either make a company or break…

Abstract

Employees are an integral part of an organisation. They are important assets for a company. Employees with their hard work and sincerity can either make a company or break a company with their insincerity or disruptive behaviour. Employees should be treated like a family. It is important for an organisation to keep employees happy. If employees are satisfied and feel part of the organisation, they will work harder and ultimately the organisation will grow by leaps and bounds. On the other hand, if they are not happy, it could adversely affect company’s growth. If employees are dissatisfied or frustrated, there is a potential that they can turn violent. Companies should take appropriate measures to make sure that the employees are free from any kind of harm.

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Management Research News, vol. 28 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Pinal Shah and Brian Kleiner

Age discrimination is common and occurs in all types of industries, fields, and professions all across the world. The common misperceptions about “older workers” include…

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6267

Abstract

Age discrimination is common and occurs in all types of industries, fields, and professions all across the world. The common misperceptions about “older workers” include hard‐to‐break habits, technological ignorance, and lack of energy and flexibility. Such attitudes, expectations, and perceptions of older workers should not exist in our professional community. Whether old or young, all people should be treated with respect and dignity. The purpose of this article is to understand the reasons behind age discrimination and ways to prevent it from occurring in the workplace. Removing age discrimination in the workplace lies in the hands of all organisations. First, they need to demolish the myths of age and realise its strengths, such as reliability, mature judgement, lack of impulsivity, timeliness, strong work ethics, and experience. Second, upper management should educate its chain of managers and supervisors about the effects discrimination has on the company’s financial situation as well as its reputation. The government plays a major role in enforcing the laws regarding age discrimination and punishing those who are unlawful.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 24 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Book part
Publication date: 27 October 2017

Tatsiana Shchurko

Purpose: After the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Belarus began to develop a national policy on reproductive health, influenced by late Soviet policy, market relations…

Abstract

Purpose: After the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Belarus began to develop a national policy on reproductive health, influenced by late Soviet policy, market relations, and international actors. The central question of this research is how the issues of reproduction and woman’s health are reconsidered in post-Soviet Belarus, in light of the influence of various social and political factors.

Methodology/approach: This chapter critically examines discourses of legal regulations of reproduction and how they promote certain understandings of national security and traditional values through reproduction. In particular, the study is based on the discourse-analysis of the official legislative documents on reproduction in Belarus between 1991 and 2015.

Findings: The transformation of the post-Soviet social protection system, reproductive health care, family policy, as well as specific configuration of public discourse legitimize one model (unified and homogenized normative body that is heterosexual, fertile, healthy, prosperous) and exclude others (non-normative bodies that are non-heterosexual, infertile, unhealthy, poor, and thus precarious for the nation) in favor of the interests of biopolitical governance, nation-building, and neoliberal ideology. Moreover, legal documents legalize new principles of social stratification and produce new ideas about responsible parenthood.

Social implications: Although there is some scholarship on reproduction in Belarus, a thorough analysis of the public discourse and the legal regulations of reproduction has yet to be conducted. Contributing to the debate about post-Soviet reproductive politics, this chapter explores the influence of the biopolitical dialogue and the panic around depopulation on social policies. In particular, this chapter offers more critical perspective toward the economic and social dynamics in Belarus, taking into account the variety of processes and configurations of discourses that influence official policy.

Details

Gender Panic, Gender Policy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-203-1

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