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Article

Vesa Taatila

The purpose of this paper is to widen the discussion about the ongoing paradigm shift in global higher education.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to widen the discussion about the ongoing paradigm shift in global higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses and gives examples on several major changes and potential future developments within higher education.

Findings

Several major changes have taken place within higher education in a short time. Financial restraints leading to shorter accountability periods, mass education and research, as well as increased competition through e-enhanced globalization, have changed the field of higher education profoundly. It simultaneously faces requirements to produce a higher level of competence, shorten the implementation periods and to offer this to an increasing number of participants with fewer resources. Thus, it should be considered if the mission of higher education institutions has changed and what that mission should be.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is written from a culturally limited point of view (Finland/Nordic countries/Europe) and does not rely on empirical research findings.

Social implications

The potential paradigm shift has major social implications globally. It may change the way we understand and operate higher education during the next few decades.

Originality/value

A lot of the presented ideas have been discussed before in other articles. However, the potential implications as a whole have not yet been adequately discussed in scientific processes.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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Article

Interview by Vesa Taatila

The purpose of this article is to provide an interview with Shima Barakat.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide an interview with Shima Barakat.

Design/methodology/approach

The interview is conducted by an independent interviewer.

Findings

Shima Barakat is research and teaching fellow at the Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning, Judge Business School, University of Cambridge, where she specializes in sustainability, gender and ethnicity, and the role of creativity in business.

Originality/value

The interview provides useful information from a leading researcher.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article

Holger Berg, Vesa Taatila and Christine Volkmann

This paper aims to provide a theoretical framework for teaching creativity.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a theoretical framework for teaching creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach and the model are based on a review of the prevalent theory and research on creativity.

Findings

The authors develop a process based approach and design and a four step model to teaching creativity.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides a framework from which exercises and interventions for teaching creativity may be derived on a scientific basis.

Practical implications

Practical implications regard teaching and conveying creativity to students.

Originality/value

The paper addresses scholars and practitioners concerned with research and teaching of creativity and innovation. It is to the authors' knowledge one of the first approaches that links theory and research of creativity to actual teaching efforts.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Content available
Article

Anne Gimson and Vesa Taatila

Abstract

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article

Vesa P. Taatila

There is a constant need to produce more entrepreneurial graduates from higher education institutions. This paper aims to present and discuss several successful cases of…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a constant need to produce more entrepreneurial graduates from higher education institutions. This paper aims to present and discuss several successful cases of entrepreneurial learning environments in order to suggest some important aspects that higher education institutions should consider.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a literature review and four previously published case studies. These are used for suggesting a hypothesis for further study.

Findings

The pedagogical challenge is that entrepreneurial competencies are more holistic and psychologically oriented than traditional subject‐matter skills. Entrepreneurial skills are learned via pragmatic real life development projects. The paper presents several successful cases of entrepreneurial education programmes in higher education institutions. It proposes an entrepreneurial learning cycle that supports the development of entrepreneurial competencies.

Research limitations/implications

The evidence presented is case‐based, and the actual results are very difficult to measure. Further large‐scale research is needed to verify or falsify the hypothesis.

Originality/value

Entrepreneurial education in higher education institutions should be fully reviewed and changed. Clear goals should be set regarding the development of graduates who are more entrepreneurially oriented. Furthermore, the educational process will require much restructuring to enhance skill development for entrepreneurship.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article

Vesa P. Taatila, Jyrki Suomala, Reijo Siltala and Soili Keskinen

The importance of innovations in business management is a widely accepted hypothesis. Lately the research on innovation has widened to include consideration of the impact…

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of innovations in business management is a widely accepted hypothesis. Lately the research on innovation has widened to include consideration of the impact of social networks on the innovation. This paper aims to contribute to research on this approach by suggesting a framework for studying the social aspects of economic innovations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses economic innovation as a product of organizational competencies, highlighting the importance of social network.

Findings

This paper has three goals: we clarify the concept of economic innovation, we present the essential questions for studying the economic innovation process, and we present a proposal for an empirical approach and address problems in collecting data about economic innovations.

Originality/value

The paper opens a new, socio‐psychological approach to studying the innovation processes. It proposes a holistic approach to the phenomenon by combining these with the material aspects of an organization. The paper provides a scientific framework for a new research program.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article

Vesa Taatila and Samuel Down

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the measurement of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) in the student population of different academic programmes, in order to enhance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the measurement of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) in the student population of different academic programmes, in order to enhance entrepreneurship‐related procedures within universities.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey‐based tool for measuring EO is presented and used in one university. The answers are explored using statistical methods.

Findings

The results show that the survey provides the user with adequate data about EO within student groups. They also demonstrate that while entrepreneurial desire differs between academic programmes, actual EO results do not.

Practical implications

In the paper it is suggested that the new information can be used for developing entrepreneurial courses as well as student selection procedures. Some modifications for the survey, as well as initiation of a wider research programme, are also proposed.

Originality/value

The paper uses a traditional survey for EO in a novel setting, amongst university students. The results create new interesting knowledge about the differences and similarities of the students of different academic programmes.

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Article

The aim is to review the latest management developments across the globe and to pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim is to review the latest management developments across the globe and to pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

While many athletes seek to gain milliseconds of advantage by launching themselves forward on “the B of Bang”, others in industry seek competitive advantage by heading into “the B of BRIC”. Brazil has been the focus for many industry leaders seeking significant growth numbers for their organizations, as it has many of the right ingredients for long term development. A large population, a rapidly developing middle class, a growing industrial output and a relatively stable economy. In fact, in 2011 it became the world's seventh largest economy displacing the UK, and this was despite GDP falling from over 7 per cent in 2010 to just 2.5 per cent in 2011.

Practical implications

The article provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article

Suzi Jarvis and Frances Mitchell

In November 2010 Ireland launched a new multi‐institutional academic initiative called The Innovation Academy to provide credited teaching programmes in innovation and…

Abstract

Purpose

In November 2010 Ireland launched a new multi‐institutional academic initiative called The Innovation Academy to provide credited teaching programmes in innovation and entrepreneurial thinking to be taken in parallel with university doctoral programmes of any discipline. This article aims to examine the design and development of this new initiative, how it integrates external organizations into its teaching programmes and how this practically translates into employment and job creation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors approached this paper using a standard qualitative data gathering approach, analyzing student reflection documents and enterprise partner feedback as well as quantitative data on participation from both academic and enterprise sources.

Findings

It was found that working with enterprises as part of the Innovation Academy Graduate Certificate in innovation and entrepreneurship has a significant impact on both the student and the enterprise partner. Students describe an increase in confidence, creativity and team‐working skills. Enterprise partners find that having student teams in their workplace reinvigorates their own staff.

Originality/value

The Innovation Academy is a new initiative in Ireland that promotes entrepreneurial thinking in postgraduate students. The structure of the course is designed to be broadly appealing so that it easily translates to an undergraduate and professional student base. The tight integration of industry (public, private and charitable) ensures that the programme consistently has its finger on the pulse of the current economic climate.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article

Victor Oltra and Alejandro Escribá‐Esteve

The paper aims to focus on fostering a strategic attitude and creativity‐related competences among management students, through alternative teaching‐learning methods…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to focus on fostering a strategic attitude and creativity‐related competences among management students, through alternative teaching‐learning methods, whereby students propose “crazy” ideas that can be applicable to (business) organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken was an active learning classroom experiment. In total, 22 participants volunteered among the authors' own students, enrolled at different management‐related degrees at the University of Valencia (Spain).

Findings

Five student teams proposed very interesting and original ideas (some “crazier” than others, many highly relevant and feasible), aimed at tackling relevant challenges at the workplace or at the university.

Research limitations/implications

Further research may be inspired by this experiment, expanding the scope of the inquiry to other student profiles and/or to actual initiatives involving organizational development and learning dynamics.

Practical implications

All proposals implied that employees/students who have fun will be more committed to their job/studies, involving “win‐win” outcomes. Moreover, the university‐related proposals can be easily adapted to a workplace context. On the other hand, the experiment itself can be also adapted as part of organizational development and learning policies – with employees taking the role here assigned to students.

Social implications

These “crazy” ideas are invaluable in societies needing radical social‐economic change (e.g. Spain) towards new, knowledge‐based models.

Originality/value

Beyond the most immediate benefits for them, private and public organizations can crucially contribute to knowledge‐driven social‐economic change by embracing these “crazy” ideas in their development and learning policies.

1 – 10 of 18