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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Vesa Peltokorpi and Mervi Hasu

The purpose of this paper is to hypothesize a curvilinear relation between transactive memory systems (TMS) and team innovation by integrating diverging conceptual and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to hypothesize a curvilinear relation between transactive memory systems (TMS) and team innovation by integrating diverging conceptual and research findings in TMS research. While increasingly argued to enhance team innovation, TMS also have negative effects on team processes and outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested the hypothesis through hierarchical linear regression analyses using data obtained from 124 technical research teams.

Findings

Logistic regressions support the hypothesis, showing an inverse U-shaped relationship between TMS and team innovation, measured by patents received.

Research limitations/implications

The average within team response rate was relatively low, and the findings are driven by a limited number of teams with patents.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that research teams with moderate levels of TMS are the most effective in terms of patents received.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first empirical study to link TMS to team innovation and to test the potential counterproductive effects of TMS on team innovation.

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 20 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2007

Vesa Peltokorpi and Emiko Tsuyuki

The purpose of this paper is to examine the ways in which scholars have proposed organizational forms combining elements of markets and hierarchies. These hybrid forms are

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1012

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the ways in which scholars have proposed organizational forms combining elements of markets and hierarchies. These hybrid forms are based on networked connections and bottom‐up entrepreneurship, fostering knowledge sharing among semi‐independent units. Despite their suitability to knowledge‐intensive companies, scholars are divided on their views on governance in internal hybrids. While knowledge management scholars emphasize soft community‐like dimensions, organizational economists seek to reduce opportunism through hard hierarchical governance. Because these views act as complementaries, this paper synthesizes them to present organizational governance in internal hybrids.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study with 56 interviews describes the functioning of soft and hard governance mechanisms in the Japanese company Maekawa Manufacturing Ltd.

Findings

The case study indicates that soft and hard governance mechanisms work in complementary ways in a successfully implemented internal hybrid.

Practical implications

Internal hybrids tend to function most efficiently with a mix of soft knowledge management practices and hard control devices.

Originality/value

Instead of taking an “either/or” perspective, this paper seeks to synthesize contrasting views of knowledge management and organizational economics.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Vesa Peltokorpi

This paper seeks to fill the research gap created by predominately Anglo‐Saxon large‐scale surveys and comparative studies by providing insights of Japanese organizational…

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2957

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to fill the research gap created by predominately Anglo‐Saxon large‐scale surveys and comparative studies by providing insights of Japanese organizational behavior through the eyes of Nordic (Finland, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden) expatriates.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical material of this paper is based on 30 semi‐structured interviews collected in Japan in 2002 and 2004.

Findings

The interviews indicate that verticality and collectivism have a prominent influence on Japanese organizational behavior. The prominent theme of verticality deviates from several Anglo‐Saxon studies focusing on collectivism.

Research limitations/implications

Similarity between interviewer and interviewees in terms of gender, nationality, and race could influence research findings. Future studies should incorporate both qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

Practical implications

Interviews show that it is important for expatriate managers to create synergic relations with local middle managers who are strategically located between the higher and lower organizational echelons.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to provide an empirical account of Japanese organizational behavior from the Nordic perspective. Due to the distinctive features of Nordic management, the studies conducted by Anglo‐Saxon researchers might not provide accurate insights for Nordic expatriates.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Vesa Peltokorpi

Despite the increased importance for companies to control their intangible assets, little empirical research has been made on the linkages between single and distributed…

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1420

Abstract

Despite the increased importance for companies to control their intangible assets, little empirical research has been made on the linkages between single and distributed cognition in organizations. In this paper, the transactive memory concept is extended and adapted to examine the antecedents and consequences of directory formation in the Nordic subsidiaries in Japan. Value congruence, psychological safety, organizational commitment, and interpersonal and electronic communication are proposed to have a positive impact on directories. The directories are proposed to have positive linkage with service capital. Regression analyses show that the most of the independent variables have a statistically significant relationship with directories. Further, interpersonal communication mediates the impact of value congruence and psychological safety to directories. Directories were also found to have a positive relationship with the service capital.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Petru L. Curşeu

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1412

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 20 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Vesa Johannes Kämäräinen, Antti Peltokorpi, Paulus Torkki and Kaj Tallbacka

Healthcare productivity is a growing issue in most Western countries where healthcare expenditure is rapidly increasing. Therefore, accurate productivity metrics are…

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1747

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare productivity is a growing issue in most Western countries where healthcare expenditure is rapidly increasing. Therefore, accurate productivity metrics are essential to avoid sub-optimization within a healthcare system. In this article, we focus on healthcare production system productivity measurement.

Design/methodology/approach

Traditionally, healthcare productivity has been studied and measured independently at the unit, organization, and system level. Suggesting that productivity measurement should be done in different levels, while simultaneously linking productivity measurement to incentives, this study presents the challenges of productivity measurement at the different levels. The study introduces different methods to measure productivity in healthcare. In addition, it provides background information on the methods used to measure productivity and the parameters used in these methods. A pilot investigation of productivity measurement is used to illustrate the challenges of measurement, to test the developed measures, and to prove the practical information for managers.

Findings

The study introduces different approaches and methods to measure productivity in healthcare.

Research limitations/implications

Practical implications

A pilot investigation of productivity measurement is used to illustrate the challenges of measurement, to test the developed measures, and to prove the practical benefits for managers.

Originality/value

We focus on the measurement of the whole healthcare production system and try to avoid sub-optimization. Additionally considering an individual patient approach, productivity measurement is examined at the unit level, the organizational level, and the system level.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Chris Brewster, Vesa Suutari and Marie-France Waxin

This paper aims: to undertake a systematic literature review on SIEs, examining twenty years of literature published between 2000 and 2020, focusing on the most-cited…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims: to undertake a systematic literature review on SIEs, examining twenty years of literature published between 2000 and 2020, focusing on the most-cited empirical work in the field; to analyse the topics covered by these studies; and to propose a research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted a systematic literature review, identifying the 20 most-cited empirical articles through citation analysis during the period and, because citations accrue over time, the six most-cited empirical articles of the last three years. We then used content analysis to examine the main themes they address and identify the research gaps.

Findings

The most common themes addressed in the SIE literature are: analysis of the types and distinctions of SIEs, motivation to undertake self-initiated expatriation, SIEs' adjustment to the new country, and SIEs' careers and outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper provides a first opportunity to look back at 20 years of research into a relatively new topic, highlighting the main research themes and knowledge gaps, and setting directions for future research. The paper expands knowledge on SIEs, assisting SIE scholars and IHRM practitioners to develop a global, critical understanding of SIEs' issues, and hopefully energising future research in this field.

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Liisa Mäkelä, Hilpi Kangas and Vesa Suutari

The purpose of this paper is to focus on satisfaction with an expatriate job and how such satisfaction is linked to leadership. Specifically, this research examines how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on satisfaction with an expatriate job and how such satisfaction is linked to leadership. Specifically, this research examines how two different kinds of distances – physical distance and functional distance – between an expatriate and his/her supervisor are related to satisfaction with the expatriate job.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted among 290 Finnish expatriates. Moderated hierarchical regression analysis was conducted in order to test the research hypothesis.

Findings

The results show that low functional distance with a supervisor is related to greater satisfaction with the expatriate job. The physical distance is not directly connected to expatriate job satisfaction, but the common effect of the two types of distance shows that among those whose functional distance is low, working in the same country with the leader is linked to greater expatriate satisfaction than recorded among those who were physically distant. Interestingly, expatriates with high functional distance are more satisfied with the expatriate job if they work in a different country to their supervisor.

Originality/value

This study makes a contribution in three areas; first, it addresses the understudied phenomena of international work-specific job satisfaction, specifically satisfaction with an expatriate job. Second, it provides new knowledge on the outcomes of leader distance in the context of expatriation, a work situation that is inherently related to changes in physical location and to organizational relationships. Third, it contributes to leadership literature and highlights the importance of the conditions and the context in which leadership occurs.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Akram Al Ariss, Iris Koall, Mustafa Özbilgin and Vesa Suutari

The purpose of this editorial is to present an overview of the papers in this special issue.

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1106

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this editorial is to present an overview of the papers in this special issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on papers in this special issue.

Findings

There is a multi‐disciplinarily approach of the papers in this issue in connecting fields of management, sociology, migration, and psychology, among others, in the area of international mobility.

Originality/value

The guest editors continue their commitment, in this special issue, to expanding the field of study of migration and the careers of migrants from theoretical and methodological perspectives.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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