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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2011

Elaine Farndale, Veronica Hope‐Hailey and Clare Kelliher

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between employees' perceptions of a particular subsystem of HRM practices (performance management) and their…

14678

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between employees' perceptions of a particular subsystem of HRM practices (performance management) and their commitment to the organisation. In addition, the study seeks to examine the mechanisms by which these perceptions translate into employee attitudes and behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 524 questionnaire responses were collected from four organisations in the UK.

Findings

The findings show that the link between employee experiences of high commitment performance management (HCPM) practices and their level of commitment is strongly mediated by related perceptions of organisational justice. In addition, the level of employee trust in the organisation is a significant moderator.

Research limitations/implications

This is a cross‐sectional study based on self‐report data, which limits the reliability of the findings. The findings may also be specific to a particular context. However, the results by company support their generalisability.

Practical implications

The findings lead one to believe that it is essential to observe the actual experiences of HCPM practices and outcomes at employee level, and to consider the broader organisational context, if one is to understand their effects on performance.

Originality/value

When exploring the impact of high commitment work practices on firm performance, little attention has been paid to the employee perspective: employees ultimately are the recipients of an organisation's HRM practices, and as such their perceptions of these practices affect their attitudes and behaviour in the workplace.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Elaine Farndale, Susanne E. Beijer, Marc J.P.M. Van Veldhoven, Clare Kelliher and Veronica Hope-Hailey

To date, work engagement has been the domain of academics whilst organisation engagement has been the focus of practice. The purpose of this paper is to address the…

2847

Abstract

Purpose

To date, work engagement has been the domain of academics whilst organisation engagement has been the focus of practice. The purpose of this paper is to address the growing divide by exploring the construct clarity and discriminant validity of work and organisation engagement simultaneously, providing insight into how these constructs relate empirically, as well as investigating the nomological network of each.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data were collected through online surveys from 298 employees in two multinational companies. Respondents were primarily managerial and professional employees. The survey included measures of work and organisation engagement, as well as work outcomes and organisation performance.

Findings

The findings indicate that work and organisation engagement are distinct constructs, and have differential relationships with important employee outcomes (commitment, organisational citizenship behaviour, initiative, active learning, job satisfaction), and organisational performance.

Practical implications

The findings provide opportunities for practitioners to explore the potentially unique ways in which different types of engagement may add value to jobs and organisations.

Originality/value

The study takes important steps in bridging the academic/practitioner divide: the paper clearly demonstrates how the two concepts of work and organisation engagement relate to and complement each other as useful constructs for research and practice.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

124

Abstract

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Freelance Writer

152

Abstract

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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