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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Michele McClung and Vernon Gayle

The purpose of this article is to explore whether the concept of social capital is helpful in explaining the educational underachievement of looked after children.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explore whether the concept of social capital is helpful in explaining the educational underachievement of looked after children.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis of data on educational achievement and social care in a cohort of 1,407 children over the age of 15 who left care in two Scottish local authorities between 2000 and 2005.

Findings

The educational attainments of children do reflect key factors in their backgrounds before entry to care but their characteristics also lead them to be placed in specific placements that have differing abilities for promoting social capital. An examination of evidence on bonding social capital, bridging social capital, and linking social capital and trust, shows that social capital theory helps to theoretically interpret the low educational achievements of looked after children.

Originality/value

The large and comprehensive data set permits a factor analysis of background and care variables, thus clarifying the significance of each in explaining children's educational attainments and assessing the value of a social capital perspective.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Vernon Gayle, Paul Boyle, Robin Flowerdew and Andrew Cullis

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between family migration (i.e. couples with or without children moving home) and social stratification in Britain…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between family migration (i.e. couples with or without children moving home) and social stratification in Britain. The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of family migration on social stratification using contemporary large‐scale nationally representative data.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper investigates data from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS). This is a nationally representative large‐scale longitudinal dataset which tracks a panel of British households and collects interview data annually.

Findings

The paper found a weak relationship between moving house and employment status. Long‐distance migration had a different effect for males and females when prior employment was considered. There was not relationship between migration and female occupational position, but a small effect for men when the move was for reasons related to their own employment. Generally, migration had a positive effect on the family's social class position.

Practical implications

The paper illustrates that longitudinal data are highly beneficial for analyses of family migration as they provide a temporal location for the move.

Originality/value

This is an original set of analyses of contemporary large‐scale nationally representative longitudinal data.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 28 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Paul S. Lambert, Koon Leai Larry Tan, Kenneth Prandy, Vernon Gayle and Manfred Max Bergman

This paper aims to present reasons why social classifications which use occupations should seek to adopt “specific” approaches which are tailored to the country, time…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present reasons why social classifications which use occupations should seek to adopt “specific” approaches which are tailored to the country, time period and gender of the subjects under study.

Design/methodology/approach

The relative motivations for adopting a specific approach to social classifications are discussed and theoretical perspectives on specificity and empirical evidence on the contribution of specific approaches are reviewed. Also the practical costs of implementing specific social classifications are evaluated, and the authors' development of the “GEODE” data service (grid‐enabled occupational data environment), which seeks to assist this process, is discussed.

Findings

Specific approaches make a non‐trivial difference to the conclusions drawn from analyses of occupation‐based social classifications. It is argued that the GEODE service has reduced the practical challenges of implementing specific measures.

Research limitations/implications

There remain conceptual and pragmatic challenges in working with specific occupation‐based social classifications. Non‐specific (“universal”) measures are adequate for many purposes.

Practical implications

The paper argues that there are few excuses for ignoring specific occupation‐based social classifications.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates that recent technological developments have shifted the balance in the long‐standing debate between universal and specific approaches to occupation‐based social classifications.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 28 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2016

Arch G. Woodside

Case study research frequently includes collecting and interpreting stories individuals tell about their lives and event that they believe that they know about. Chapter 3…

Abstract

Synopsis

Case study research frequently includes collecting and interpreting stories individuals tell about their lives and event that they believe that they know about. Chapter 3 discusses storytelling theory and describes case study research in consumer behavior of stories that consumers tell about buying and using products and services. Storytelling is pervasive through life. Much information is stored, indexed, and retrieved in the form of stories. Although lectures tend to put people to sleep, stories move them to action. People relate to each other in terms of stories — and products and brands often play both central and peripheral roles in their stories. To aid storytelling research in consumer psychology, this chapter develops a narrative theory that describes how consumers use brands as props or anthropomorphic actors in stories they report about themselves and others. Such drama enactments enable these storytellers to experience powerful myths that reflect psychological archetypes. The chapter includes findings from case study research that probes propositions of the theory. Implications for consumer psychology and marketing practice follow the discussion of the findings.

Details

Case Study Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-461-4

Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2009

Liviu Voinea and Johannes Stephan

Purpose – The main research question of this contribution is whether local market concentration influences R&D and innovation activities of foreign affiliates of…

Abstract

Purpose – The main research question of this contribution is whether local market concentration influences R&D and innovation activities of foreign affiliates of transnational companies.

Methodology/approach – We focus on transition economies and use discriminant function analysis to investigate differences in the innovation activity of foreign affiliates operating in concentrated markets, compared to firms operating in nonconcentrated markets. The database consists of the results of a questionnaire administered to a representative sample of foreign affiliates in a selection of five transition economies.

Findings – We find that foreign affiliates in more concentrated markets, when compared to foreign affiliates in less concentrated markets, export more to their own foreign investor's network, do more basic and applied research, use more of the existing technology already incorporated in the products of their own foreign investor's network, do less process innovation, and acquire less knowledge from abroad.

Research limitations/implications – The results may be specific to transition economies only.

Practical implications – The main implications of these results are that host country market concentration stimulates intranetwork knowledge diffusion (with a risk of transfer pricing), while more intense competition stimulates knowledge creation (at least as far as process innovation is concerned) and knowledge absorption from outside the affiliates' own network. Policy makers should focus their support policies on companies in more competitive sectors, as they are more likely to transfer new technologies.

Originality/value – It contributes to the literature on the relationship between market concentration and innovation, based on a unique survey database of foreign affiliates of transnational corporations operating in Eastern Europe.

Details

Research on Knowledge, Innovation and Internationalization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-956-1

Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2006

Dennis J. Gayle and Jonathan N. Goodrich

As both concept and process, privatization possesses ambiguous connotations and multiple meanings. Webster's Dictionary (1981) defines one related noun, privatism, as “an…

Abstract

As both concept and process, privatization possesses ambiguous connotations and multiple meanings. Webster's Dictionary (1981) defines one related noun, privatism, as “an attitude of uncommitment or uninvolvement in anything beyond one's immediate interests,” while another associated noun, privacy, denotes a state of “withdrawal from society or the public interest” (Oxford English Dictionary, 1972). If government is a means of providing a wide range of collective goods, which do not necessarily lend themselves to market exchange, the public sector is naturally a highly visible target.4 At the same time, unrestrained public-sector expansion inevitably leads to public policy failure, as problems of communication, coordination, effective cost–benefit control, and revenue satiation accumulate.5 Privatization represents a logical reaction.

Details

Comparative Public Administration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-453-9

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Robert Kieft

The heady system of high‐pressure Continental air that drifted across the Atlantic and collided with the traditional cyclonic patterns of U.S. literary academe in the…

Abstract

The heady system of high‐pressure Continental air that drifted across the Atlantic and collided with the traditional cyclonic patterns of U.S. literary academe in the mid‐1960s precipitated a “Theory Revolution” that has brought a couple of decades of stormy and stimulating weather to the campus. The collision has produced occasionally furious debate and resulted for higher education in the kind of public attention customarily reserved for athletic scandals; it has kept tenuring processes in turmoil and publish‐or‐perish mills working round the clock.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Oswald A. Mascarenhas, Ram Kesavan and Michael Bernacchi

In light of the desire to bring about an increase in the global distribution of lifesaving drugs at affordable prices, the purpose of this paper is to focus on the global…

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Abstract

Purpose

In light of the desire to bring about an increase in the global distribution of lifesaving drugs at affordable prices, the purpose of this paper is to focus on the global marketing of lifesaving drugs related to the current pandemic of HIV/AIDS.

Design/methodology/approach

An analogical model is used to challenge companies to reengineer their products and their strategies to meet the twin objectives of profitability and humanitarianism. Following analogical reasoning, it is argued that an innovative reengineering and redesigning of lifesaving drugs can meet the great needs of developing countries with affordable prices.

Findings

The paper proposes an analogical model that treats the marketing of drugs in general and of lifesaving drugs in particular, to the developing countries as a “target problem.” This problem can be resolved by seeking analog “candidate solutions” from other “source industries” that have faced similar problems.

Practical implications

In recent decades the pharmaceutical industry and its free market model of marketing drugs have come under sharp criticism both domestically and globally. Their pricing and distribution of lifesaving drugs to developing countries have been severely criticized. This paper helps pharmaceutical firms to meet the need for lifesaving drugs in developing countries.

Originality/value

Analogical reasoning as applied to marketing is new. The paper submits that this solution will be more effective in combating the HIV/AIDS pandemic than any current solutions. The paper discusses the strategic marketing implications of the analogical model.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Stephanie C. Payne, Satoris S. Youngcourt and Kristen M. Watrous

To conduct a content analysis of the portrayal of Frederick W. Taylor in management and psychology textbooks to reveal differences both within and across disciplines.

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Abstract

Purpose

To conduct a content analysis of the portrayal of Frederick W. Taylor in management and psychology textbooks to reveal differences both within and across disciplines.

Design/methodology/approach

Forty‐four textbooks from six sub‐disciplines within management and psychology were content analyzed for the amount and accuracy of the material presented about Taylor and the extent to which key terms were included in these descriptions.

Findings

The data show that more information is provided in the management texts and the majority of the information conveyed across disciplines appears accurate.

Research limitations/implications

Not all textbooks were examined within all sub‐disciplines within management or psychology or all sub‐disciplines to which Taylor ostensibly contributed. Future research is needed to determine why Taylor is portrayed differently across texts.

Practical implications

Results have important teaching implications as they reveal how accurately textbooks portray one controversial historical figure and what students are learning. Students might be encouraged to consult original sources and information beyond the text. Textbook authors should be held accountable for the accuracy of the information in their texts and may find the comparison information informative. Instructors may find the results useful when selecting a new text.

Originality/value

This paper depicts variability in how historical figures are depicted in textbooks, which is an important part of management history education.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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