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1 – 10 of 18
Article
Publication date: 6 August 2019

Cristina M. Giannantonio, Amy E. Hurley-Hanson, Sharon L. Segrest, Pamela L. Perrewé and Gerald R. Ferris

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the effects of recruiter friendliness and both verifiable and non-verifiable job attributes in the…

1450

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the effects of recruiter friendliness and both verifiable and non-verifiable job attributes in the recruitment process.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 498 participants watched a videoed simulation of a recruitment interview and completed a questionnaire. Three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the interaction and main effect hypotheses.

Findings

Applicant reactions were more favorable with a friendly recruiter. The more favorable the verifiable job attribute information (JAI), the more favorable the applicant reactions were to the employment opportunity. Compared to applicants who received negative or no non-verifiable JAI, applicants who received positive or mixed non-verifiable JAI were more attracted to the recruiter, perceived the employment opportunity as more desirable, and were more willing to pursue the employment opportunity. Reactions were most favorable in the positive non-verifiable JAI condition, less favorable in the mixed condition, and least favorable in the negative condition. Surprisingly, the “no information” mean was above the negative information condition.

Originality/value

This fully crossed 2 × 3 × 4 experiment simultaneously examined 2 levels of recruiter friendliness, 3 levels of verifiable job attributes and 4 levels of non-verifiable job attributes. The five dependent variables were attraction to the recruiter, attraction to the employment opportunity, willingness to pursue the employment opportunity, the perceived probability of receiving a job offer and the number of positive inferences made about unknown organizational characteristics. Previous research examining the effects of employment inducements and job attributes were conducted in field settings where it is difficult to control the amount and favorability of JAI applicants receive.

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Markus Arnold

This paper aims to analyze challenges of subjective performance evaluation (SPE) and their effects on team performance. It focuses on discretionary bonus allocations in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze challenges of subjective performance evaluation (SPE) and their effects on team performance. It focuses on discretionary bonus allocations in teams and challenges driven by cognitive biases on the superior or the employee side. This is important as efficient teamwork is a relevant source of competitive advantages in firms, and firms often rely on teams to coordinate various, mutually supportive organizational activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The author analyzes results that have recently been discussed in the literature and link them to each other to create a more holistic picture about potential performance effects of SPE. Based on the analyses, the author develops avenues for future research and point out open questions.

Findings

Exploring employees’ fairness perceptions in team settings in which there is no clear standard for a “fair” team bonus allocation, the author finds that perceived fairness of team bonus allocation may decrease under SPE because employees interpret the “fairness” of the bonus allocation from an egocentric perspective. Such decrease in perceived fairness can eventually even lead to decreased team performance. Likewise, on the superior side, more complex, but highly relevant team can cause cognitive biases of superiors in assessing employee performance, thereby decreasing the potentially positive effects of SPE on team performance.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by analyzing recently discovered challenges of SPE in teams and linking them to each other to draw more general conclusions about the performance effects of SPE. For practice, my findings imply that firms may want to be cautious when evaluating the potential effects of SPE – as it is made by human beings with their cognitive biases. For research, the paper opens up new research possibilities and points out open questions.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Louis H. Amato, Arthur Zillante and Christie H Amato

– This paper aims to examines whether firms’ eco-friendly advertising claims are supported by environmentally friendly behavior.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examines whether firms’ eco-friendly advertising claims are supported by environmentally friendly behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops a game theory model to determine the circumstances under which firms’ environmental claims will be supported by the adoption of best environmental practice. Least squares regression is used to test major theoretical implications.

Findings

The theoretical model suggests that the credence good nature of un-monitored environmental claims prohibits consumer validation; firms have an incentive to advertise green but no incentive to adopt best environmental practice. Third-party monitoring transforms the game, making eco-friendly outcomes possible. Empirical models based on North American data suggest that firm profit rates are related to verifiable environmental claims and to easily accessible external ratings of environmental performance.

Originality/value

Unlike previous game theoretical models for similar goods, the eco-friendly outcome does not require a repeated game. The importance of the single period game is that continued patronage is not required for the firm to produce goods containing the desired attributes.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Yaw Sarfo, Oliver Musshoff and Ron Weber

With exclusive data from a commercial microfinance institution (MFI) in Madagascar, the purpose of this paper is to investigate if loan officer rotation (change of loan…

Abstract

Purpose

With exclusive data from a commercial microfinance institution (MFI) in Madagascar, the purpose of this paper is to investigate if loan officer rotation (change of loan officer) has an effect on credit access (loan approval) in rural and in urban areas. The authors further analyze how the frequency of loan officer rotation affects credit access in rural and in urban areas.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply propensity score matching to compare credit access between loan applicants who experienced loan officer rotation and loan applicants who experienced no loan officer rotation in rural and in urban areas.

Findings

Results show that loan officer rotation has a positive and statistically significant effect on credit access. The authors observe further that loan officer rotation has a different effect on credit access in rural and in urban areas. Whilst rural loan applicants who experienced loan officer rotation are more likely to have credit access, urban loan applicants show no statistically significant effect of loan officer rotation on credit access. For the frequency effect on credit access, the authors observe that one loan officer rotation has a positive and statistically significant effect on credit access whereas results are mixed for two loan officer rotations.

Research limitations/implications

Even though the authors can show that loan officer rotation can improve credit access to loan applicants, especially in rural areas, the conditions in Madagascar are unique. Therefore, results need to be verified in other countries and institutional contexts.

Practical implications

From the perspective of MFI, the authors recommend that the management of MFI needs to provide better tools to loan officers to improve on the evaluation of agricultural loan products or standardize the assessment of agricultural loan products to improve on lending decisions. Further, if applicable, the authors recommend that MFI should consider using credit worthiness assessment procedures which rely less on loan officer’s judgment for loan evaluation, such as automated systems. From the perspective of loan applicants, the authors recommend that loan applicants should request for a change of loan officer if they experience successive loan applications rejection.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first to provide empirical evidence on the effect and frequency of loan officer rotation on credit access in Sub-Sahara Africa, and Madagascar, in particular.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 80 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Future of Recruitment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-562-2

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

Michael Volgger and Songshan Sam Huang

This paper aims to broaden the understanding of social responsibility in hospitality and tourism by positioning it in the wider context of responsibilities for deviant…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to broaden the understanding of social responsibility in hospitality and tourism by positioning it in the wider context of responsibilities for deviant behaviour. The paper presents a critical literature review that scopes responsible and irresponsible behaviour of different stakeholders in hospitality and tourism and tackles some of the often-unquestioned assumptions of CSR, including who should be held accountable for ensuring responsibility (“the onus of responsibility”).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper follows the methods and structure of a critical, concept-driven literature review. The literature review is inclusive in terms of its source material and covers different research traditions and study fields.

Findings

The paper helps to overcome two unquestioned assumptions of CSR, i.e. that tourism responsibility is located best at the self-regulating business level and that responsible behaviour is preferred as a focus which oftentimes overshadows the issue of irresponsible behaviour. CSR is positioned as one approach amongst many to govern and tackle deviant tourism behaviour. Moreover, CSR’s blind spot on irresponsibility is removed.

Originality/value

The paper is the first one to integrate the literature of CSR in hospitality and tourism with the literature on deviant tourism behaviour and on corporate social irresponsibility and can thereby cross-fertilise and broaden the three perspectives. The paper contributes to the literature by substantially widening the perspective of CSR in hospitality and tourism, thus opening new avenues of research.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

Ben Burdetsky and Marvin S. Katzman

This article was written as a result of a study of alternative Work Pattern (AWP) applications in the United States. The study was designed to ascertain how Flexitime or…

Abstract

This article was written as a result of a study of alternative Work Pattern (AWP) applications in the United States. The study was designed to ascertain how Flexitime or other AWP's impact worker productivity, morale, absenteeism, turnover, or other such measures of woker's performance or attitude. The results of the study were inconclusive insofar as the main research question was concerned. 214 organisations throughout the United States were surveyed with a view toward the evaluation of their previously reported AWP applications. A one page survey schedule was mailed to the 214 organisations and there were 78 responses, thus yielding a response rate of 36 percent. Table 1 shows the response rate.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Abstract

Details

The Strength of Difference: Itineraries of Atypical Bosses
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-582-5

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 November 2021

Francesca Bernini, Paola Ferretti and Antonella Angelini

This paper aims to focus on the relation between digital transformation and banks’ reputation, as examined through the information disclosed by the five largest Italian…

1621

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the relation between digital transformation and banks’ reputation, as examined through the information disclosed by the five largest Italian banking groups’ efforts to extend and enhance their digital resources. Considering digitalization as a key strategy for managing reputation, which, in turn, can leverage financial and value performance management, the paper investigates whether and how digital activities might affect banks’ reputation. Therefore, this paper proposes the relationship between digitalization and reputation as a lever for performance management and for increasing efficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use content analysis to generate a digital disclosure index, categorizing activities human, structural and relational. For banks’ reputations, the proxies are a measure of corporate reputation and a reputational risk index. Methodologically the study used multiple case studies, considered as particularly suitable to gain an in-depth understanding of the topic in the case of the five banks. A collection of secondary data and semi-structured interviews are included.

Findings

Overall, the digitalization-reputation link shows that banks’ reputation is variously affected, not only by exposure to risk (including reputational risk) but also by strategic issues such as digitalization and the effectiveness of the corresponding communication. Consequently, banks should view digitalization as a key driver to be considered not in a stand-alone perspective, but in a combined approach.

Research limitations/implications

Continued research should include the Covid-19 implications. Additionally, it would be important to compare a larger number of banks, with different characteristics, also including variables indicating the corporate governance mechanisms.

Practical implications

The analysis contributes to fostering scholars’ and practitioners’ management of the digital transformation challenge that is a current key-factor, capable of increasing banks’ value. It considers not only the drivers directly affecting monetary value but also the institutions’ social and relational value, as well as their reputation.

Originality/value

This paper extends prior research on the digitalization-reputation relation by investigating digital transformation through disclosure of activities in this area within the Italian banking sector. It allows to leverage the key-factors that can contribute to increasing banks’ value, considering not only the drivers directly affecting monetary value but also the institutions’ social and relational value, as well as their reputation.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2020

Francesco Campanella, Francesco Gangi, Mario Mustilli and Luana Serino

This paper aims to deal with the perceptions of banks’ managers about some criteria for assessing creditworthiness related to firms and how these criteria affect…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to deal with the perceptions of banks’ managers about some criteria for assessing creditworthiness related to firms and how these criteria affect non-performing loans (NPLs). The paper wants to respond to the following research question: “Which criteria influence the magnitude of NPLs?” The evidence is based on the improvement of credit quality in the Italian banking system, which the authors study in aggregate and size-specific analyses, creating two subsamples (large and small banks).

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used was a mixed method approach. The values of the variables were quantified according to the information derived from Thomson Reuters (Eikon, Datastream), the financial reporting of the banks and questionnaires directly administered to the bank managers.

Findings

This research about loans selection criteria provides useful indications for “The Basel Framework”. The results show that managers of the large banks are improving the approach of allocating the loans; the managers of the small banks are getting worse in the period 2006-2016. Therefore, it should be valuable to build a new standard about qualitative and quantitative criteria to recognize credit risk. In particular, these criteria could be adopted to reduce NPLs, and they should be different in small banks and large banks.

Originality/value

The study is part of empirical research investigating the causes of the significant increase in NPLs in the Italian banking system in 2006-2016. Most research interprets the increase in NPLs in the Italian banking system only as an effect of the crisis in the Italian entrepreneurial system. This research offers a different interpretation of the problem, interpreting the phenomenon as a delay of the banking system in investing in an effective information criterion.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

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