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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Qin Yao and Eric C. Schwarz

The case of the Mercedes-Benz Arena in Shanghai, China raises an important issue with respect to transnational venue management corporations embedding and operating in…

Abstract

Purpose

The case of the Mercedes-Benz Arena in Shanghai, China raises an important issue with respect to transnational venue management corporations embedding and operating in foreign markets. The purpose of this paper is to examine how Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG) has implemented social embeddedness strategy to influence the management structure and enhance operational performance of the Mercedes-Benz Arena.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was chosen to examine the social embeddedness of AEG through the Mercedes-Benz Arena in Shanghai. An in-depth interview was conducted with John Cappo, the President and CEO of AEG China, in April 2016. In addition, the relative news and interviews of leaders from AEG and AEG China over the past ten years was also collected. Qualitative content analysis of the data was conducted through a coding approach. All the materials were coded into three main categories based on three aspects of social embeddedness: local stakeholder relations, reputation and trust-building, cultural and institutional adaptation.

Findings

AEG has demonstrated how a transnational venue management corporation can successfully integrate social embeddedness strategy with the management structure and operational procedures of the Mercedes-Benz Arena in three ways. First is through the relationship between AEG and its partners in the joint venture, OPG in terms of the enforcement of the contract, the clear division of responsibilities, and the mutual understanding and use of relationship building. Second is the relationship between AEG and the local government in Shanghai. Third was adapting the structures of AEG to fit within local culture and institutional contexts.

Originality/value

The unique multi-stakeholder relationship inherent to venue management in China raises important questions with respect to transnational venue management corporations operating in foreign markets. The adaptation to the local context, as a moderating factor to the institutional exposure of a venue management company involves more challenging obstacles for non-local firms, compared to firms which are familiar with their institutional context. Understanding the key solutions in building relationships and trust with partners in joint venture and local government, as well as the key methods to adopt in local contexts, have applications across any number of sport industries.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2019

Yan Chen

To improve the operational management benefits of large-scale sports venues, the literature data method, questionnaire survey method, and comparative analysis method were…

Abstract

To improve the operational management benefits of large-scale sports venues, the literature data method, questionnaire survey method, and comparative analysis method were used to study the planning and management of large-scale sports stadiums in China. From the macro external environment, the micro external environment and the internal management of the venue, the opportunities and challenges of China's large stadiums were analyzed. Corresponding countermeasures to improve the efficiency of venue operation management were proposed. The results show that the proportion of business structure of large-scale sports stadiums in China was unreasonable, and the ontology management was in a polarized development trend. The venue utilization rate was generally low. In addition, the operational management benefits of large-scale sports stadiums in China were affected by the micro-external environment and the internal conditions of the venues. Therefore, this research has important reference significance for the operation and management of stadiums.

Details

Open House International, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2019

David M. Herold, Tim Breitbarth, Nico Schulenkorf and Sebastian Kummer

Although logistics management is a crucial part of local and global sports events, there is no research-driven characterization of “sports logistics management”. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Although logistics management is a crucial part of local and global sports events, there is no research-driven characterization of “sports logistics management”. The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a framework that allows for a more structured recognition of logistics in sports, in general, and sport event management, in particular. In addition, we conduct a systematic literature review of sports logistics management and locate opportunities for future research both for sports management and logistics management scholars.

Design/methodology/approach

Guided by Durach et al.’s (2017) systematic literature review approach, we identify key attributes and characteristics of sports logistics management. These are based on studies featuring at least partial aspects of logistics management in sports and sport events, and that were published between 2000 and mid-2019.

Findings

The study reveals that sports logistics management – meaning logistics activities in sports and sport event management – is a heavily under-researched area that provides an abundance of scientific opportunities. Based on the three sport event types of local/regional sport events, major sport events and mega sport events, the authors propose four sports logistics management pillars that are central to the proposed Sport Logistics Framework: venue logistics management, sports equipment logistics management, athletes logistics management, and fan and spectators logistics management.

Practical implications

By providing a conceptual framework for sports logistics, the authors progress towards informing the sport sector on relevant strategic and operational levels of logistics management and set the stage for empirical studies that are likely to advance sport logistics planning and management.

Originality/value

This is the first study that builds on a systematic review of literature specifically focused on the logistics aspect in sports and sport event management. It provides a conceptual framework of sports logistics management and offers an agenda of future research opportunities.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Haralabos Stamatakis, Dimitris Gargalianos, Yiannis Afthinos and Pantelis Nassis

Identifies major issues of the contingency planning process covered by the Sydney Organizing Committee of Olympic Games (SOCOG) with regard to the various venues. For the…

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3189

Abstract

Identifies major issues of the contingency planning process covered by the Sydney Organizing Committee of Olympic Games (SOCOG) with regard to the various venues. For the evaluation of the findings the Australian Business Excellence Framework has been used. The methodology includes a literature review and five in‐depth interviews with individuals who played an active role in the planning process. The results indicate that as far as the overall planning process is concerned, there has been: a lack of communication between the three levels of hierarchy within SOCOG 2000 (senior management, contingency planning project team and venue teams); a limited involvement of the venue management in the process in all levels; a poor follow up regarding the evaluation and the documentation of the contingency plans made; and a considerable inadequacy in terms of “real life” exercises that would enable the venue teams’ personnel to practice what has been planned.

Details

Facilities, vol. 21 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Ioannis Minis, Marion Paraschi and Apostolos Tzimourtas

This paper aims to focus on the design of the organization, processes, and systems of Olympic logistics.

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8119

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the design of the organization, processes, and systems of Olympic logistics.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic methodology has been developed to design the strategy and tactics of logistics operations for the Athens 2004 Olympic Games. This methodology considers Olympic‐specific characteristics, host country characteristics, as well as lessons learned from previous games. It comprises the generation, analysis and evaluation of strategic alternatives, the development of core business processes and the prediction of resource requirements. Furthermore, the proposed method provides guidelines to complement the experiential knowledge that has been used exclusively in the past to plan the logistics operations of the games and similar large‐scale events.

Findings

Successful design principles, such as model venue planning, standardization of materials, the establishment of the Logistics Command Center (LCC), as well as establishment of an independent administration function, can be applied regardless of the specific characteristics of the host country. However, there are principles such as outsourcing, warehousing, or just‐in‐time (JIT) deliveries, that are based on certain specific characteristics (constraints/advantages) of the host country, such as a mature 3PL market, the existence and availability of large warehouses, and the completion of the venues in sufficient time prior to the beginning of the games.

Practical implications

The proposed design process provides generic rules that may be applied to guide the set up of operations for future games. Furthermore, the paper offers some useful insights applicable to the logistics of large events.

Originality/value

It is the first time that a systematic view of Olympic logistics is dealt with, as opposed to experiential knowledge with local applicability that has been used in the past to plan similar operations.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Vladimir Antchak and Eleanor Adams

This paper aims to identify the key quality attributes a museum or art gallery should possess and enhance to become an attractive business event venue.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the key quality attributes a museum or art gallery should possess and enhance to become an attractive business event venue.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a two-stage case-study methodology. Firstly, three museums were selected in Manchester, UK, to explore the venues’ approaches to hosting business events. These were the Lowry Art Centre, Salford Museum and Manchester Art Gallery. Secondly, a business event at another museum in the city, Science and Industry Museum, was accessed to explore the audiences’ perceptions and industry requirements regarding the organisation of events in museums. In total, 21 qualitative semi-structured and structured interviews were conducted with the event delegates, event planners and museums’ management.

Findings

Thematic analysis was applied to identify three key attributes: venue character, memorability and functionality and feasibility. Venue character refers to the overall appeal of a venue, including its history, status and interior design. Memorability refers to the authenticity and uniqueness of the attendee experience at a corporate event organised in a museum. Finally, functionality and feasibility deals with the availability of functional facilities, space flexibility and diverse venue regulations.

Originality/value

The findings of the research provide valuable insights to both museums and event companies. The research reveals the main benefits and drawbacks of using a museum or an art gallery as a venue for business events and suggests key aspects to consider while staging a business event in a cultural institution. Museums could apply the findings in marketing to emphasise their uniqueness, authenticity and flexibility.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Myrsini Koukiasa

The article aims to provide an insight into concepts, frameworks and processes related to sustainable facility management (FM) within event venues. A further objective is…

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5795

Abstract

Purpose

The article aims to provide an insight into concepts, frameworks and processes related to sustainable facility management (FM) within event venues. A further objective is to determine whether, to the degree that this is possible, in which degree there is consensus in relation to the above aspects amongst the literature findings and what is followed in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of current literature was conducted in order to determine current trends in the sustainable FM sector that concern venues from a design, facility manager, organisation and stakeholder perspective. It is equally addressed to academics, students, practitioners, suppliers and investors.

Findings

It was found that although in literature, there is an abundance of good practices to follow, in many cases this is not possible due to costs or lack of focus of the organisation.

Practical implications

Even if guidelines are followed, there should be a greater standardisation of prerequisites and publication of detailed results so best practice within the industry can be looked up to. Managers, owners, etc. should have more of these and publish them as well.

Originality/value

The article contributes to an understanding of the elements of sustainable FM as well as their interconnectivity and importance. It also offers examples in order to investigate the applicability of current literature.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Philip C. Rothschild

This paper aims to uncover how social media is used, managed, and perceived by sports and entertainment venue (SEV) managers. While there is considerable evidence that…

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9087

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to uncover how social media is used, managed, and perceived by sports and entertainment venue (SEV) managers. While there is considerable evidence that social media has been used effectively by Fortune 500 companies, it is not known how social media is administered and perceived among managers of arenas, stadiums, performing art centers, and convention centers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used survey methodology to capture the perceptions of 383 venue management professionals, all members of the International Association of Venue Managers (IAVM).

Findings

Most venue managers feel their social media efforts are proficient or at the expert level and most have a defined social media strategy. Others feel much less confident about their social media efforts and have no defined social media strategy. At a statistically significant level, those with a defined social media strategy report increased revenue, while those without a defined social media strategy do not. Venue managers forecast a significant increase in non‐traditional marketing strategies while using traditional marketing efforts over the next three years far less.

Research limitations/implications

While the 383 responders are IAVM active members who are in venue management, they reasonably represent SEV managers in general and these survey results can be generalized to SEV managers with an overall conservative margin of error of ±5.0 percent at the 95 percent confidence level. The survey was conducted online by e‐mail invitation. While using the online media to deliver a survey related to the proliferation of various online activities was, at one time, questionable and, potentially, a source of responder bias, the current level of saturation of e‐mail use by and comfort with online activity of professionals mitigates these likely sources of responder bias and is not a source of additional concern with this study.

Practical implications

The paper concludes with a discussion of the results and a recommendation that venue managers define a social media strategy that includes hiring or reassigning staff to support this important area of social media marketing.

Originality/value

This paper is unique in that examines social media use in the unique context of SEVs.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Zhiheng Zhao, Ray Y. Zhong, Yong-Hong Kuo, Yelin Fu and G.Q. Huang

Physical gatherings at social events have been found as one of the main causes of COVID-19 transmission all over the world. Smartphone has been used for contact tracing by…

Abstract

Purpose

Physical gatherings at social events have been found as one of the main causes of COVID-19 transmission all over the world. Smartphone has been used for contact tracing by exchanging messages through Bluetooth signals. However, recent confirmed cases found in venues indicated that indirect transmission of the causative virus occurred, resulting from virus contamination of common objects, virus aerosolization in a confined space or spread from inadequate ventilation environment with no indication of human direct or close contact observed.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a novel cyber-physical architecture for spatial temporal analytics (iGather for short). Locations with time windows are modeled as digital chromosomes in cyberspace to represent human activity instances in the physical world.

Findings

Results show that the high spatial temporal correlated but indirect tracing can be realized through the deployment of physical hardware and spatial temporal analytics including mobility and traceability analytics. iGather is tested and verified in different spatial temporal correlated cases. From a management perspective of mobilizing social capacity, the venue plays not only a promotion role in boosting the utilization rates but also a supervision-assisted role for keeping the venue in a safe and healthy situation.

Social implications

This research is of particular significance when physical distancing measures are being relaxed with situations gradually become contained. iGather is able to help the general public to ease open questions: Is a venue safe enough? Is there anyone at a gathering at risk? What should one do when someone gets infected without raising privacy issues?

Originality/value

This study contributes to the existing literature by cyber-physical spatial temporal analytics to trace COVID-19 indirect contacts through digital chromosome, a representation of digital twin technology. Also, the authors have proposed a venue-oriented management perspective to resolve privacy-preserving and unitization rate concerns.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 121 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

Xin Jin and Karin Weber

The purpose of this study was to provide a holistic view of exhibition destination attractiveness by examining perceptions of two of the three key stakeholders (exhibition…

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3122

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to provide a holistic view of exhibition destination attractiveness by examining perceptions of two of the three key stakeholders (exhibition organizers and visitors) and contrasting them with those of exhibitors.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used a mixed method approach, collecting 535 responses from visitors attending nine business-to-business exhibitions in four major cities in China via structured surveys. In addition, eight in-depth interviews with CEOs/owners of leading global and Chinese exhibition companies were conducted.

Findings

The findings revealed that exhibitors may go almost anywhere where there is potential for successful business. In contrast, visitors prefer exhibition destinations with good accessibility to minimize travel time and an attractive leisure environment that offers a degree of enjoyment in addition to taking care of business. A destination’s “economic environment” and “cluster effects” were comparatively less important to them. Organizers were cognizant of these differences, contributing to their reluctance in taking large-scale, branded exhibitions to second-tier destinations, despite considerable efforts by these cities to improve their infrastructure.

Practical implications

This study offers practical guidelines for destination administrators and exhibition organizers with regard to evaluating destination resources for long-term exhibition development.

Originality/value

In contrast to prior studies, this research identifies significant differences in perceptions of exhibition destination attractiveness among all three key industry stakeholders. It also presents a persuasive case for the need to clearly differentiate between the attractiveness of a destination for attracting/hosting exhibitions versus conventions, rather than approaching the subject from a more generic meetings, incentives, conferences, and exhibitions (MICE) segment/business events perspective.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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