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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Wencang Zhou, Huajing Hu and Michael Zey

First, using the task-relationship dichotomy as a framework, the purpose of this paper is to examine the direct effects of team personality level and team personality…

Abstract

Purpose

First, using the task-relationship dichotomy as a framework, the purpose of this paper is to examine the direct effects of team personality level and team personality diversity on new venture growth. Second, the study examines the interaction effects of team personality level and diversity on venture growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of 154 teams in a technology incubator in China. Data were collected through an online survey.

Findings

Results indicate that high level but low diversity of team task-oriented personality was beneficial for new venture founding teams. Diversity of team task-oriented personality would hurt the new venture growth more when the level of task-oriented personality was low. Relationship-oriented personality diversity, but not the level of relationship-oriented personality, influenced new venture growth.

Research limitations/implications

These findings advance research in entrepreneurship, groups, and teams, and provide practical policy implications as well.

Practical implications

This study provides practical implications for policy makers regarding what supports should be provided in incubators and for entrepreneurs regarding team member selection.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers to study the personality composition of new venture founding teams.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Maria Kakarika

The purpose of this paper is to answer the following question: how should start‐ups be staffed and how should they manage issues of team diversity?

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to answer the following question: how should start‐ups be staffed and how should they manage issues of team diversity?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper approaches diverse entrepreneurial teams in terms of three meaningful types, each with different assumptions, thus suggesting that their effects are complex.

Findings

The article concludes that entrepreneurs need to consider three key dimensions of diversity and form teams that are: moderate in diversity of opinions; high in diversity of expertise; and low in diversity of power.

Originality/value

The paper offers a set of practical recommendations to entrepreneurs, outlining how they can compose their teams and manage different dimensions of diversity; and to venture capitalists, suggesting how to assess team diversity as a critical factor in entrepreneurial teams.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 31 July 2014

G. Tyge Payne, Miles A. Zachary and Matt LaFont

This chapter acknowledges the difficulties in the empirical study of social ventures – broadly defined as market-driven ventures that produce social change – that arise…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter acknowledges the difficulties in the empirical study of social ventures – broadly defined as market-driven ventures that produce social change – that arise from the vast differences among social venture firms in terms of missions, goals, identities, strategies, and structures. In an effort to improve research in this area and advance the field of social entrepreneurship, the authors advocate approaching social ventures from a configurational perspective.

Design/methodology

This chapter begins with a discussion of what social ventures are and why organizational configurations – sets of firms that are similar across key characteristics – may be an appropriate perspective to utilize. Then, two methods – cluster analysis and set-theoretic analysis – are discussed in detail as ways to approach the study of social venture configurations. Details include descriptions of the techniques, instructions for use, examples, and limitations for each.

Implications

This chapter identifies research opportunities using configurations approaches in social venture research. Substantial possibilities for multilevel and temporally based research are discussed in depth.

Originality/value

A configurational approach can address the incongruence and non-findings in current social venture research and offers new opportunities for future research.

Details

Social Entrepreneurship and Research Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-141-1

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2007

Mark Simon, Susan M. Houghton and G.T. Lumpkin

The entrepreneurs’ ability to identify opportunities can lead to wealth creation and competitive advantage. Often, however, opportunities that are innovative may defy…

Abstract

The entrepreneurs’ ability to identify opportunities can lead to wealth creation and competitive advantage. Often, however, opportunities that are innovative may defy up-front analysis suggesting that the entrepreneurs may have had somewhat inaccurate perceptions and need to refine their ideas after the ventures are started. This paper therefore focuses on mitigating the negative impact of early misperceptions through the use of learning-oriented information processing systems to refine opportunities post starting a venture. Specifically, it suggests that an experienced and heterogeneous top management team and a decentralized, organic structure enhance the system's ability to gain knowledge from acting on early misperceptions and may even form the basis for a distinctive capability that leads to competitive advantage.

Details

Entrepreneurial Strategic Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1429-4

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Case study
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Supriya Munshaw and Christina Black

Graduate or Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Majors

Abstract

Study level/applicability

Graduate or Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Majors

Subject area

Entrepreneurship/Venture Capital Investing

Case overview

The case highlights a women-founded venture capital firm that values investments in diverse entrepreneurs and an innovative retail business started by two minority entrepreneurs. Students will be asked whether the firm should invest in the venture and will also be asked to discuss models that may help transform the retail business into a VC-backed scalable technology business.

Expected learning outcomes

By the end of the discussion, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate the feasibility and scalability of a new business venture 2. Evaluate the alignment between a venture capital company and a new venture.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Social implications

This case highlights the lack of resources for women and minority entrepreneurs as well as the underrepresentation of minority women in the Venture Capital industry.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship

Details

The Case For Women, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2732-4443

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Case study
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Supriya Munshaw and Christina Black

Graduate or Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Majors

Abstract

Study level/applicability

Graduate or Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Majors

Subject area

Entrepreneurship/Venture Capital Investing

Case overview

The case highlights a women-founded venture capital firm that values investments in diverse entrepreneurs and an innovative retail business started by two minority entrepreneurs. Students will be asked whether the firm should invest in the venture and will also be asked to discuss models that may help transform the retail business into a VC-backed scalable technology business.

Expected learning outcomes

By the end of the discussion, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate the feasibility and scalability of a new business venture 2. Evaluate the alignment between a venture capital company and a new venture.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Social implications

This case highlights the lack of resources for women and minority entrepreneurs as well as the underrepresentation of minority women in the Venture Capital industry.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship

Details

The Case For Women, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2732-4443

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Yogesh Maheshwari and Khushbu Agrawal

This paper aims to examine the impact of initial public offering (IPO) grading on earnings management by Indian companies in their IPOs. Specifically, it investigates…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of initial public offering (IPO) grading on earnings management by Indian companies in their IPOs. Specifically, it investigates whether earnings management significantly differs in the pre-IPO grading regime and post-IPO grading regime. Further, it examines whether earnings management significantly differs between high-graded and low-graded IPOs.

Design/methodology/approach

The cross-sectional modified Jones model is used to obtain the discretionary accruals, a proxy for earnings management. The impact of IPO grading on earnings management is assessed using multiple regression analysis.

Findings

Earnings management is significantly lower in graded IPOs as compared to the ones that are not graded. Further, among the graded IPOs, the high-graded IPOs exhibit lower earnings management as compared to the low-graded IPOs. The findings are robust to the use of an alternative measure for discretionary accruals.

Originality/value

IPO grading in India is a unique certification mechanism, introduced for the first time in any market. This paper establishes the efficacy of this mandatory certification mechanism in reducing earnings management. The findings could be valuable to issuer companies, investors and market regulators.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2010

Helena Buhr and Jason Owen-Smith

Networks connecting two important supporting institutions – law firms and venture capital partnerships – explain regions’ disparate abilities to sustain diverse…

Abstract

Networks connecting two important supporting institutions – law firms and venture capital partnerships – explain regions’ disparate abilities to sustain diverse high-technology ventures. In order to explain the diversity of entrepreneurial activity in a region, we distinguish between institutional capacity (the number of law firms and venture capitalists in a locale), strong interinstitutional connections that span legal and financial domains, and cohesive structural communities of directly and indirectly connected supporting organizations. We argue that strong connections and cohesive communities are essential, but little examined contributors to the development of diverse research-based economies. We find support for the argument in an empirical analysis of initial public offerings (IPOs) by U.S. high-technology companies in five industries between 1993 and 2005. Linking regional outcomes to strong ties that span local legal and financial institutions and to cohesive structures that weld them into communities offers new insights for research on the institutional and network underpinnings of entrepreneurship and regional economic development.

Details

Institutions and Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-240-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Poh‐Lin Yeoh

This study employs learning‐based theory to shed light on performance among newly internationalizing companies. Earlier studies have suggested that learning is an…

Abstract

This study employs learning‐based theory to shed light on performance among newly internationalizing companies. Earlier studies have suggested that learning is an important goal for firms pursuing international diversification. Unlike previous studies which have focused their attention on one aspect of learning, this study examines three kinds of learning from internationalization: technological, market, and social. The impact of top management's prior international experience and cultural diversity on the three types of learning were also examined to understand their contingency effects. Consistent with social capital theory, external networks with suppliers and customers are a major contributor to a firm's international performance. Also, the findings for the influence of market learning on firm performance support the assumptions underlying the resource‐based view of the firm. However, mixed results were obtained for the relationship between technological learning and firm performance. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 21 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2007

Satu Teerikangas

Different forms of inter-organisational encounters, including joint ventures, alliances, mergers and acquisitions, have over the last decades become fashionable and…

Abstract

Different forms of inter-organisational encounters, including joint ventures, alliances, mergers and acquisitions, have over the last decades become fashionable and much-sought means of globalisation. A continuous concern shared by managers involved in these different forms of inter-organisational encounters is the challenge of making them work in practice – their successful implementation and management. The cultural dimensions of these different kinds of inter-organisational encounters, particularly in cross-border contexts, have been deplored as being particularly difficult. This paper builds on prior research and aims to understand how the cultural dimensions of inter-organisational encounters have been approached by researchers on mergers and acquisitions on the one hand and researchers on alliances and joint ventures on the other hand. Based on a comparative literature review, the findings suggest that the two fields, despite their valuable contributions and the similarities in the phenomena they study, have remained surprisingly isolated from one another and would offer opportunities for cross-fertilisation. Through its theoretical contribution, the paper intends to offer insights to researchers in both streams of research.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1381-5

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