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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2022

Juan Felipe Parra, Alejandro Valencia-Arias and Jonathan Bermúdez-Hernández

Entrepreneurial intention is one of the main predictors of venture creation. However, the approaches used to analyze the entrepreneurial intention and venture creation are…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurial intention is one of the main predictors of venture creation. However, the approaches used to analyze the entrepreneurial intention and venture creation are mostly linear approaches, leaving aside the fact that new ventures arise in a context characterized by fluctuations and instability, especially in emerging economies where economic and social factors are highly variables. Nevertheless, a dynamic approach could best represent its behavior. This study aims to propose an alternative approach and a starting point for more complex dynamic models in the entrepreneurship process that surpass the limitation of the current linear methodologies and allow gathering isolated studies' contributions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposes a method to shed light on the processes related to the venture creation process and entrepreneurial intention by designing a system dynamics simulation model.

Findings

The results reveal that the delayed effect of expectations produces a growing tendency in project creation, venture establishment and venture creation. Likewise, the entrepreneurial intention is not a static variable; it changes by the system’s dynamics and disturbs the venture creation process, which produces an increase in oscillations in the model and, therefore, reduces the project’s growth and venture creation.

Research limitations/implications

This model is a generic approach for the study of venture creation and entrepreneurial intention. The model can analyze entrepreneurial intention and venture creation in different contexts, adjusting the different model parameters. The authors run a sensitivity analysis to encompass deviation from the parameter established and the uncertainty about them. However, the empirical data used for the model’s testing, in this case, correspond to an approximation to the behavior of venture creation in Colombia, which is considered an emerging economy. The model proposed does not pretend to incorporate all the variables and phenomena about entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

The approach suggested in this work aims to conceptualize venture creation as a complex process that emerges from the occurrence and combination of simpler states, instead of activities that represent building blocks. In addition, the term “entrepreneurial process” is defined as a composite of different perspectives that use a series of multidisciplinary theories to address the topic.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2017

Rick Colbourne

Indigenous entrepreneurship and hybrid venture creation represents a significant opportunity for Indigenous peoples to build vibrant Indigenous-led economies that support…

Abstract

Indigenous entrepreneurship and hybrid venture creation represents a significant opportunity for Indigenous peoples to build vibrant Indigenous-led economies that support sustainable economic development and well-being. It is a means by which they can assert their rights to design, develop and maintain Indigenous-centric political, economic and social systems and institutions. In order to develop an integrated and comprehensive understanding of the intersection between Indigenous entrepreneurship and hybrid ventures, this chapter adopts a case study approach to examining Indigenous entrepreneurship and the underlying global trends that have influenced the design, structure and mission of Indigenous hybrid ventures. The cases present how Indigenous entrepreneurial ventures are, first and foremost, hybrid ventures that are responsive to community needs, values, cultures and traditions. They demonstrate that Indigenous entrepreneurship and hybrid ventures are more successful when the rights of Indigenous peoples are addressed and when these initiatives are led by or engage Indigenous communities. The chapter concludes with a conceptual model that can be applied to generate insights into the complex interrelationships and interdependencies that influence the formation of Indigenous hybrid ventures and value creation strategies according to three dimensions: (i) the overarching dimension of indigeneity and Indigenous rights; (ii) indigenous community orientations and (iii) indigenous hybrid venture creation considerations.

Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2012

Scott R. Gordon

This study examined the effect that venture creation action has on the outcomes of nascent entrepreneurship. A conceptual model was developed which proposes action as a…

Abstract

This study examined the effect that venture creation action has on the outcomes of nascent entrepreneurship. A conceptual model was developed which proposes action as a fundamental mechanism in venture creation. Thus, action should rightly be considered as a means which transmits the effects of venture resource endowments on to venture creation outcomes. This conceptual model was empirically supported in a random sample of nascent ventures. Ventures with higher levels of human or social capital were found to be more active in venture creation. In turn, more active venture attempts were more likely to achieve improved venture creation outcomes. Further, human and social capital, on their own, exhibit little direct influence on the venture outcomes achieved. These findings confirm action's central place in the venture creation process.

Article
Publication date: 20 August 2021

Mir Dost, Syed Mir Muhammad Shah and Irfan Saleem

The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of mentor expectations on nascent entrepreneur’s venture creation and how this relationship strengthens/weakens…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of mentor expectations on nascent entrepreneur’s venture creation and how this relationship strengthens/weakens when mediated by the sense of nothing to lose and entrepreneurial resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

The author nested the data from mentors and protégé entrepreneurs by using a questionnaire survey. Mentors were those individuals who were established entrepreneurs and involved in training to protégé entrepreneurs. Protégé entrepreneurs were those who were part of the cohorts in incubation centers for training and startup training.

Findings

Data revealed that it was unlikely to create a new venture when mentors displayed low expectations in protégé entrepreneurs. However, this relationship was positively mediated by the sense of nothing to lose and entrepreneurial resilience.

Practical implications

The findings have important implications on how mentor expectations can hinder protégé entrepreneurs’ venture creation and how it turns around when entrepreneurs display the ability of nothing to lose and resilience.

Originality/value

Mentorship from other experienced individuals has become essential to entrepreneurs and their fledgling ventures. Although there is an acknowledgment that mentoring improves an entrepreneur’s likelihood of success in a new venture, yet far too little the authors know about the degree of expectations in mentor-mentee relationships and new venture creation. This research connects those pieces of the puzzle and fills the gap.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Isa Nsereko, Juma Wasswa Balunywa, Lawrence Musiitwa Kyazze, Hamidah Babirye Nsereko and Jamidah Nakato

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between entrepreneurial alertness, personal initiative and social entrepreneurial venture creation and to examine…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between entrepreneurial alertness, personal initiative and social entrepreneurial venture creation and to examine the mediating role of personal initiative in the relationship between entrepreneurial alertness and social entrepreneurial venture creation among social ventures in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a quantitative approach where hypotheses were statistically tested using structural equation modeling based on survey data (n = 243) from community-based organization owner-managers in Uganda.

Findings

Results show that both entrepreneurial alertness and social personal initiative are positively and significantly associated with social entrepreneurial venture creation. Results further indicate that personal initiative partially mediates the relationship between entrepreneurial alertness and social entrepreneurial venture creation.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this study provides a shred of initial empirical evidence on the relationship between entrepreneurial alertness, entrepreneurial personal initiative and social entrepreneurial venture creation using evidence from Uganda, a developing country. Mostly, this study provides initial evidence of the mediating role of personal initiative in the relationship between entrepreneurial alertness and social entrepreneurial venture creation in an under-researched developing country – Uganda.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 July 2021

Nina Hasche and Gabriel Linton

The study aims to examine the development of student venture creation in a co-curricular business model lab initiative with collaboration between students, researchers…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine the development of student venture creation in a co-curricular business model lab initiative with collaboration between students, researchers, technology transfer offices (TTO) and industry. It presents a fresh approach to the study of student venture creation by discussing a unique co-curricular case, its embeddedness in a network and drawing on the concept of tension.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, case-based research design is applied containing data from interviews, observations and active participation.

Findings

The findings point to the inherent difficulties in managing and organizing student venture creation and networks surrounding the student venture creation in a co-curricular setting that can lead to several different types of tensions. Episodes where task-, role-, process-, affective- and value-related tensions arise are identified. Furthermore, the findings highlight that affective-related tension is often an outcome of other types of tensions.

Research limitations/implications

Our theoretical implications point to the importance of the context of student venture creation, but not only regarding curricular and co-curricular initiatives; depending on the context, such as if student surrogate entrepreneurship is used, different types of support structure might also be needed to enable student venture creation.

Originality/value

Research on the entrepreneurial university has mainly focused on entrepreneurship education and ventures created by researchers. This study responds to recent calls for research on the venture creation of students. The limited research conducted on student venture creation can be divided between curricular and co-curricular initiatives. Our research points out that many other contextual factors are of importance, such as the origin of ideas, student surrogate entrepreneurship, industry collaboration, team formation and expectations.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2013

Mats A. Lundqvist and Karen L. Williams Middleton

Venture creation is often seen as the form of academic entrepreneurship least compatible with the role of university scientists. The purpose of the article is to explore…

2232

Abstract

Purpose

Venture creation is often seen as the form of academic entrepreneurship least compatible with the role of university scientists. The purpose of the article is to explore the changing role of university scientists towards venture creation, and understand the influence of university‐driven initiatives for venture creation.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is based on a qualitative study of two venture creation cases: one from a US university, and one building from two universities in Sweden. The cases and associated university environments were selected due to their venture creation activity. University venture creation data of the three universities complements the cases.

Findings

Venture creation at universities can be more compatible with the traditional role of the university scientist. Centers and laboratories concerned with entrepreneurship and action‐based education are identified as key university resources allowing university scientists to engage in venture creation in more compatible ways, and not having to become the lead venture creator.

Research limitations/implications

The study underlying the article is limited to three university environments (in two countries) where venture creation activity is relatively frequent.

Originality/value

The article shows that venture creation can be more compatible with the role of the university scientist due to more collective entrepreneurial activity at universities. Furthermore, university scientists, in synergizing between different entrepreneurial roles, are important for venture creation without taking the lead venture entrepreneur role. Involving students in venture creation together with scientists is proposed as one such important entrepreneurial role that has not previously been recognized.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Kannadhasan M., Parikshit Charan, Pankaj Singh and Sivasankaran N.

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of social capital with new venture creation, and whether self-efficacy plays a role in mediating the association…

1121

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of social capital with new venture creation, and whether self-efficacy plays a role in mediating the association between social capital and new venture creation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 375 entrepreneurs through cross-sectional survey in India. The study used partial least square path modeling to assess the relationships among the variables.

Findings

Findings reveal that social capital is positively related to new venture creation. The association of social capital and new venture creation is fully mediated by entrepreneurs’ self-efficacy.

Originality/value

The role of social capital in the success of new venture creations through self-efficacy is useful to the potential entrepreneurs and people who facilitate new venture creation in Indian context.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 56 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2018

Jun Li and Dev K. Dutta

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of founding team experience (industry and venturing) in new venture creation. This paper posits the following questions…

3380

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of founding team experience (industry and venturing) in new venture creation. This paper posits the following questions: How does founding team experience influence the likelihood of new venture creation, in the nascent stage? How does industry context moderate this relationship? The study aims to fill an important gap in the literature by unpacking the impact of different types of founding team experiences on venture outcome, and by focusing on the influence of founding team in the venture creation process, specifically at the nascent stage.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilizes data from the Second Panel Study of Entrepreneurial Dynamics, a longitudinal data set of 1,214 nascent entrepreneurs in the USA. Logistics regression was employed to analyze the effect of founding team experience on new venture creation. Post hoc analysis was conducted to ensure the confidence of the findings.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights about how founding team experience influences the likelihood of new venture creation in the nascent stage. At the nascent stage, founding team industry experience positively affects new venture creation while founding team venturing experience does not. However, in the high-technology industry environment, the influence of the founding team’s venturing experience on new venture creation is stronger than that in the low-technology industry environment.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the design of the data set, there is a risk of “right-censoring” problem. Also, because the study used archival data on founding teams, the methodology did not allow for uncovering the underlying team processes and dynamics during the venture creation process based on learning from experience. Future studies are encouraged to examine other types of founding team experience and the underlying process-level factors on venture creation.

Practical implications

The paper provides important practical implications for nascent entrepreneurs/entrepreneurial teams on team assembling and composition. In general, a team with higher-level industry experience is critical for venturing success. A team with higher-level venturing experience is more desired in the high-technology industry.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills an important gap in the entrepreneurial team literature by highlighting the complex and nuanced ways in which founding team experience influences the likelihood of venture creation in the nascent stage of the firm, especially after incorporating the additional impact of the industry context.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2018

Carolin Auschra, Timo Braun, Thomas Schmidt and Jörg Sydow

The creation of a new venture is at the heart of entrepreneurship and shares parallels with project-based organizing: embedded in an institutional context, founders have…

Abstract

Purpose

The creation of a new venture is at the heart of entrepreneurship and shares parallels with project-based organizing: embedded in an institutional context, founders have to assemble a team that works on specified tasks within a strict time constraint, while the new venture undergoes various transitions. The purpose of this paper is to explore parallels between both streams of research and an increasing projectification of entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based upon a case study of the Berlin start-up ecosystem including the analysis of interviews (n=52), secondary documents, and field observations.

Findings

The paper reveals that – shaped by their institutional context – patterns of project-like organizing have become pertinent to the new venture creation process. It identifies a set of facets from the entrepreneurial ecosystems – more specifically different types of organizational actors, their occupational backgrounds, and epistemic communities – that enable and constrain the process of new venture creation in a way that is typical for project-based organizing.

Originality/value

This study thus elaborates on how institutional settings enforce what has been called “projectification” in the process of new venture creation and discuss implications for start-up ecosystems.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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