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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2019

Andriani Kusumawati, Nelson Perera and Venkata Yanamandram

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors influencing Indonesian students’ choice of university by estimating the trade-off students make in selecting a university.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors influencing Indonesian students’ choice of university by estimating the trade-off students make in selecting a university.

Design/methodology/approach

Conjoint analysis was used to examine the relative importance and the part-worth scores of the attributes that influence students’ public university preferences in Indonesia.

Findings

High-school leavers in Indonesia trade off university preferences and view advice from family, friends, and/or teachers, reputation, and job prospects as important factors for selecting a public university. Two different preference-based segments of prospective students were identified from cluster analysis, and classified as either a “social networks-based decision” or a “rational decision” segment. A choice simulator was employed with three propositions, and the segments were found to have dissimilar preferences.

Research limitations/implications

While this paper provides insights on higher-education consumer choice, more research is needed that includes samples from different types of higher-education institutions and fields of study.

Practical implications

A greater understanding of student choice can help to inform marketing practices and customize marketing strategies for each segment by providing important information to principal parties involved in making university choice decisions.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates the relevance and value of conjoint analysis as an effective analytical tool for the identification of important choice criteria and its potential contribution to the development of more effective marketing strategies.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Lesley White and Venkata Yanamandram

The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical framework of the factors that potentially influence dissatisfied customers to continue purchasing from their existing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical framework of the factors that potentially influence dissatisfied customers to continue purchasing from their existing service provider in the business‐to‐business (B2B) services sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This review paper synthesises the findings from previous studies on switching barriers, and relationship variables, dependence, and calculative commitment.

Findings

Five major factors deter customers from switching to an alternative service provider: switching costs; interpersonal relationships; the attractiveness of alternatives; service recovery; and inertia. These factors are mediated by dependence and calculative commitment.

Originality/value

This is the first comprehensive study of the factors that potentially influence dissatisfied customers to remain behaviourally loyal to a service provider in the B2B services sector. This important study has significance for marketers in developing strategies for customer retention and service recovery.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Venkata Yanamandram and Lesley White

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which inertia is distinct from calculative commitment and to extend the knowledge on these constructs in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which inertia is distinct from calculative commitment and to extend the knowledge on these constructs in the corporate financial services context in Australia. The study proposes and empirically analyses a research model that considers switching costs as an antecedent to inertia and calculative commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

An e‐mail URL‐embedded web questionnaire was used to collect data online from responding organisations. The psychometric properties of the measures were analysed using confirmatory factor analysis, and the hypothesised relationships among the latent constructs were estimated using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The variance‐extracted test established discriminant validity between inertia and calculative commitment. Switching costs affected both inertia and calculative commitment differently.

Research limitations/implications

The measurement scales should be subjected to further assessment before drawing conclusions on their construct validity. The findings support the contention that inertia occurs from high search and learning costs associated with transaction account products, and that calculative commitment is caused by the existence of sunk costs.

Practical implications

Managers should be cautious in employing barriers as mechanisms for customer retention, because calculatively committed customers might be behaviourally loyal only for as long as it is instrumentally rewarding to be so. However, dissatisfied customers often can become involved in inert buying patterns.

Originality/value

This paper is an important initial step in highlighting the extent to which inertia is distinct from calculative commitment, in addition to providing a measure of inertia.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Venkata Yanamandram and Lesley White

To investigate the determinants of behavioural brand loyalty amongst dissatisfied customers in the business‐to‐business (B2B) services sector.

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the determinants of behavioural brand loyalty amongst dissatisfied customers in the business‐to‐business (B2B) services sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was conducted, with 28 personal interviews undertaken with managers who are involved in the choice of service providers. The respondents belonged to 24 organisations located in Australia. Template analysis and eyeballing were techniques used to analyse the data collected.

Findings

Assessment of the reasons why dissatisfied customers stayed with the service providers resulted in six categories. The categories were found to be, in order of decreasing frequency, impact of alternative providers, switching costs (18), others (17), inertia (14), investment in relationships (13), and service recovery (13). The results not only confirmed factors found in the literature, but also uncovered 11 other factors.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size, whilst appropriate for qualitative research, should be considered adequate only for exploratory analysis and a further quantitative study is needed to validate the study.

Practical implications

This study is important for those firms who have many prospective switchers because it is important to understand why these customers stay, and to what extent such firms can discourage such customers from leaving in both positive and negative ways. For those service firms that are attempting to attract these prospective switchers, an understanding of why they do not switch is important, as it will enable them to develop strategies to overcome these switching barriers and gain market share.

Originality/value

This research is the first study to investigate in a single model a range of barriers to switching in a B2B services context. The results that confirmed categories found in the literature also discovered 11 other factors not evident in the extant literature.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2010

Andrew Hanna, Lesley White and Venkata Yanamandram

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether and how much patients would be willing to pay for diabetes disease state management (DSM) services in community…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether and how much patients would be willing to pay for diabetes disease state management (DSM) services in community pharmacies, and also to determine the relationships between willingness to pay (WTP) and different clinical/socio/demographic characteristics of patients.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 130 diabetic patients recruited from 14 pharmacies across Sydney, Australia completed self‐administered questionnaires. SPSS 16.0 was used to assess WTP in four scenarios (50 and 100 percent improvement in diabetes control after a 30 minute initial and 30 minute follow‐up consultation, respectively). Descriptive and inferential statistical techniques (regression) were used to analyse data.

Findings

Patients are willing to pay a median of AUS$30 for 50 percent improvement and AUS$40 for 100 percent improvement per 30 minute initial consultation, and AUS$20 for 50 percent improvement and AUS$30 for 100 percent improvement per 30 minute follow‐up consultation. Although results varied across scenarios, WTP generally increased when: patients' income is greater than AUS$150,000; frequency of patients' diabetes‐related hospitalizations is between 2 and 4; and patients' perceptions of pharmacists' ability are higher. The remainder of the variables tested are not significantly associated with WTP.

Practical implications

The findings demonstrate that most patients are willing to pay for diabetes DSM services in community pharmacies, and there is a great opportunity for pharmacies to expand their clinical services in this area.

Originality/value

The key contribution to the literature is the data relating to the willingness of Australian diabetic patients to pay for pharmacy‐delivered disease management support, and how this varies across people with different clinical/socio/demographic characteristics.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Avinandan Mukherjee

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Avinandan Mukherjee

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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