Search results

1 – 10 of over 22000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Subrata Chakraborty and Tiny Philip

Unprecedented changes sweeping the world during the last few years have given rise to the need for the development and adoption of contingency strategies. This requires…

Abstract

Unprecedented changes sweeping the world during the last few years have given rise to the need for the development and adoption of contingency strategies. This requires firms to have strategic flexibility in every aspect of their operation. Vendor development strategies constitute an important component in achieving this flexibility. Attempts to draw up an explicit conceptual link between generic business unit strategies and generic vendor development strategies. Proposes a vendor structure framework with three dimensions representing vendor structure scope, vendor structure relationship and vendor structure focus. Uses the framework to develop certain generic vendor development strategies. Considers the four generic strategies suggested by Porter, namely industry‐wide cost leadership strategy, industry‐wide differentiation strategy, segment cost leadership strategy and segment differentiation strategy and, for each one of these, proposes appropriate vendor development strategies.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 16 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

James H. Walther

Reviews the various scenarios which exist for library‐vendor relations. Considers the questions which should be asked when evaluating the individual products, services and…

Abstract

Reviews the various scenarios which exist for library‐vendor relations. Considers the questions which should be asked when evaluating the individual products, services and options of vendors; and the pros and cons of using one or many vendors. Describes a new model ‐ the project approach. Presents examples of various library‐vendor communications ‐ both positive and negative.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Charles A. Weber, John Current and Anand Desai

Presents an approach for evaluating the number of vendors to employ in a procurement situation using multi‐objective programming (MOP) and data envelopment analysis (DEA)…

Abstract

Presents an approach for evaluating the number of vendors to employ in a procurement situation using multi‐objective programming (MOP) and data envelopment analysis (DEA). The approach advocates developing vendor‐order quantity solutions (referred to as supervendors) using MOP and then evaluating the efficiency of these supervendors on multiple criteria using DEA. Formulations are presented for both the MOP and DEA models. A case study is presented for a Fortune 500 company in a just‐in‐time (JIT) manufacturing environment.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Pralay Pal and Bimal Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to provide a “trait based approach” for vendor selection and evaluation for expensive procurements in large businesses through a simple and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a “trait based approach” for vendor selection and evaluation for expensive procurements in large businesses through a simple and easy‐to‐use mathematical model using safety, quality, delivery and cost criteria. Design/methodology/approach – We use 16 traits addressing safety (S), quality (Q), delivery (D) and cost (C) areas for evaluating performance of a vendor on a linear 10 point scale. We start with evaluating each “supplier‐supply item” combination and compute gross averages for each of the SQDC areas and finally arrive at an “Overall Performance Index” for each supplier‐supply item combination. These indices form a “Vendor Performance Dashboard” for decision making. Findings – The case study shows that the proposed method is quick and easy to adopt, and provides a logical framework for vendor selection and management, based on performance in the four critical (SQDC) areas. Research limitations/implications – A lot of monotonous computations are required for the proposed vendor evaluation process. Hence, the scope for software development warrants further investigation. There is also a need to develop a process for weighting the different SQDC elements for application in different industry/market contexts. Originality/value – This paper presents a unique and simple approach for generating dashboard data for decisions regarding evaluation of vendors and distribution of sub‐contracts in a dynamic technology intensive market with practical examples. The proposed model for vendor selection and determination of order sizes is less dependent on complex algorithms and more practical and logically framed than existing models.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2014

Christopher Williams and Maya Kumar

We use experiential learning theory to develop new conceptual insights into offshore outsourcing of innovation. In particular, we show how offshore vendor firms are able…

Abstract

We use experiential learning theory to develop new conceptual insights into offshore outsourcing of innovation. In particular, we show how offshore vendor firms are able to overcome liability of outsidership and eventually learn how to innovate on behalf of their onshore clients as a result of their embedment with clients across multiple teams. We theorize that the cross-border relocation of innovative activities from a client firm to an offshore vendor is only possible when teams within the vendor team have assumed a double-loop learning capability from the client allowing them to determine governing variables relating to the client’s organizational environment. Through direct on-the-job experience working with each other, international teams comprised in part from the vendor and in part from the client can undergo different learning transitions, which we classify as either relationship-oriented or task-oriented. These transitions determine the extent to which double-loop learning can be developed in offshore locations and are influenced by intra-team dynamics and the way the joint teams organize and manage themselves. Our perspective has implications for our understanding of organizational designs associated with both client and vendor multinational enterprises seeking to benefit from innovation in offshore outsourcing.

Details

Orchestration of the Global Network Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-953-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 28 June 1991

Sara C. Heitsbu

Abstract

Details

Library Technical Services: Operations and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-795-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 December 2020

Pooja Thakur-Wernz and Christian Wernz

While the phenomenon of R&D offshoring has become increasingly popular, scholars have mostly focused on R&D offshore outsourcing from the point of view of the client…

Abstract

Purpose

While the phenomenon of R&D offshoring has become increasingly popular, scholars have mostly focused on R&D offshore outsourcing from the point of view of the client firms, who are often from an advanced country. By examining vendor firms, in this paper the authors shift the focus to the second party in the dyadic relationship of R&D offshore outsourcing. Specifically, the authors compare vendor firms with nonvendor firms from the same emerging economy and industry to look at whether vendor firms from emerging economies can improve their innovation performance by learning from their clients. The authors also look at the role of depth and breadth of existing technological capabilities of the vendor firm in its ability to improve its innovation performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on firm-level data from the Indian biopharmaceutical industry between 2005 and 2016. The authors use the Heckman two-stage model to control for self-selection by firms. The authors compare the innovation performance of vendor firms with nonvendor biopharmaceutical firms (group vs nongroup analysis) as well as innovation performance across vendor firms (within group comparison).

Findings

The authors find that, compared to nonvendor firms, R&D offshore outsourcing vendor firms from emerging economies have higher innovation performance. The authors argue that this higher innovation performance among vendor firms is due to learning from their clients. Among vendor firms, the authors find that the innovation gains are contingent upon the two factors of depth and breadth of the vendor firms' technological capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

This paper makes three contributions: First, the authors augment the nascent stream of research on innovation from emerging economy firms. The authors introduce a new mechanism for emerging economy firms to learn and upgrade their capabilities. Second, the authors contribute to the literature on global value chains, by showing that vendor firms are able to learn from their clients and upgrade their capabilities. Third, by examining the innovation by vendor firms, the authors contribute to the R&D offshore outsourcing, which has largely focused on the client.

Practical implications

The study findings have important implications for both clients and vendors. For client firms, the authors provide evidence that knowledge spillovers do happen, and R&D offshore outsourcing can turn vendors into potential competitors. This research helps firms from emerging economies by showing that becoming vendors for R&D offshore outsourcing is a viable option to learn from foreign firms and improve innovation performance. Going outside geographic boundaries may be a large hurdle for these resource-strapped, emerging economy firms. Providing offshore outsourcing services for narrow slices of R&D activities may be a starting point for these firms to upgrade their capabilities.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first to quantitatively study the innovation performance of vendor firms from emerging economies. The authors also contribute to the nascent literature on innovation in emerging economy firms by showing that providing R&D offshore outsourcing services to client firms from advanced countries can improve firms' innovation performance.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 November 2019

Cynthia Denise McGowan Poole

The purpose of this research was to uncover perceptions of information technology outsourcing (ITO) project leaders and project teams regarding knowledge transfer between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was to uncover perceptions of information technology outsourcing (ITO) project leaders and project teams regarding knowledge transfer between client and vendor partners during opening and closing transition phases of ITO projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative methods and exploratory case study design were used. Purposeful sampling was used to identify ITO knowledge assets including project team members and organizational documents and artifacts that may provide information regarding the knowledge transfer processes during the transition phases of the ITO project. Sample criteria were ITO project team members from one US-based client organization and the company’s international vendor partners. The study population included project managers, analyst, developers, subject matter experts (SMEs) and other ITO knowledge workers involved in the ITO project from one US-based organization. Interview and document analysis were done using of NVivo Pro 11® research software.

Findings

Four themes emerged from participant responses relative to the opening and closing phases of ITO projects including KT approaches to plans and processes; KT dependencies relative to IT project team member’s reliance on project tools, processes and artifacts; determinants of KT success or failure relative to project team members’ perceptions; and role of documentation relative to communication and distribution of KT outcomes.

Originality/value

This research may provide insights into additional aspects of knowledge transfer during ITO transition phases, which may be used by IT leaders and project teams to plan for successful knowledge transfer during the transition phases of ITO projects.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 June 2020

Jian-Jun Wang, Negin Sasanipoor and Meng-Meng Wang

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence of PRINCE2 (PRoject IN Controlled Environments 2) standard on customer satisfaction jointly with vendor relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence of PRINCE2 (PRoject IN Controlled Environments 2) standard on customer satisfaction jointly with vendor relationship management capability in the information technology outsourcing (ITO) context. This paper further tries to explore the above underlying mechanism by studying the mediating effect of deliverable quality.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops a mediated moderation model to explain the underlying influence processes of PRINCE2 standard, vendor relationship management capability and deliverable quality on ITO customer satisfaction. By conducting a pair-wise survey of 260 project managers in seven Iranian firms, the model and hypotheses are empirically tested with the partial least squares method.

Findings

Our results suggest that firms benefit more in terms of IT costs reduction when they have a higher level of complementary investment in an external standard, especially through an interplay effect of the external standard and internal relational aspect. Firms can make business processes more amenable to outsourcing and facilitate monitoring of vendor performance and effective coordination with vendors. More interestingly, we find that this interactive effect is fully mediated by deliverable quality, which, in turn, directly increases ITO customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study adds some new knowledge and provides new views to study ITO customer satisfaction by addressing the importance of PRINCE2 standard. This study further enhances our understanding in terms of the underlying pathway through which the PRINCE2 standard jointly affects customer satisfaction with vendor relationship management capability and deliverable quality. With the effort of explicitly explaining the complex mechanisms, this study helps ITO managers proactively escort outsourcing activities and projects.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 April 2020

Maisa Mendonça Silva, Thiago Poleto, Ana Paula Henriques de Gusmão and Ana Paula Cabral Seixas Costa

The purpose of this paper is to propose a strategic conflict analysis, based on the graph model for conflict resolution (GMCR), that is applied to information technology…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a strategic conflict analysis, based on the graph model for conflict resolution (GMCR), that is applied to information technology outsourcing (ITO) in a real-world software development and implementation process in Brazil.

Design/methodology/approach

Because the idea of this study is to answer “why” the ITO conflicts occur and “how” they can be avoided, the case study methodology was adopted. The software GMCR II was used to analyze the interactions between an IT vendor and an IT client.

Findings

The results suggest that a lack of relational governance is a critical issue that could be handled to improve the interaction between those involved.

Research limitations/implications

The main results are restricted to the case study and cannot be generalized. Moreover, a specific limitation of this paper pertains to the use of the GMCR and the consequent difficulty for IT vendors and IT clients to work with a large number of actions and to set preferences for several states of conflict.

Practical implications

The strategic analysis of outsourcing conflicts provides a holistic view of the current situation that may assist the client and vendor in future decisions and identify guidelines to ensure successful ITO. Therefore, this paper provides an effective guide for clients and vendors to better manage conflicts and establish a contingency vision to avoid such disputes.

Originality/value

The ITO conflict is analyzed using the GMCR, considering both perspectives of the outsourcing process (vendors and clients).

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 22000