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Article

Velma Lee, Frank Ridzi, Amber W. Lo and Erman Coskun

The purpose of this paper is to explore the learner styles of a healthcare institution transition team and its respective members within a change management context. In…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the learner styles of a healthcare institution transition team and its respective members within a change management context. In particular we focus on the role of learner style in the success of change efforts within a team setting.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a case study that employs a questionnaire survey, non‐participant observation, and semi‐structured interviews as part of a larger study of healthcare change management.

Findings

Findings suggest that a mix of learning styles is ideal for successful healthcare change management. Specifically, this limited study suggests a learner ratio that favors convergers and assimilators over divergers and accommodators may be the most effective staffing strategy for change leadership teams in a healthcare environment.

Originality/value

Managing change in healthcare has been researched from a process perspective but few studies examine the individual team members' learner styles and the impact of these learning styles over time. Implications for human resources and change implementation are discussed.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article

David M. Boje and David Perez

Professor Slawomir Magala is a full professor of Cross-Management at the Department of Organization and Personnel Management in Rotterdam School of Management (RSM)…

Abstract

Purpose

Professor Slawomir Magala is a full professor of Cross-Management at the Department of Organization and Personnel Management in Rotterdam School of Management (RSM), Erasmus University (RSM, 2015). His education stems from Poland, Germany and the USA, and has taught and conducted research in China, Egypt, Kazakhstan, Croatia, Estonia, the United Kingdom and Namibia. He is a former Chair for Cross-Cultural Management at RSM and has achieved many things, from being editor-in-chief of the Journal of Organizational Change Management (JOCM), to receiving the Erasmus Research Institute in Management (ERIM) Book Award (2010), for The Management of Meaning in Organizations (Routledge, 2009). It has received honors for being the best book in one of the domains of management research. It was selected by an academic committee, consisting of the Scientific Directors of CentER (Tilburg University), METEOR (University of Maastricht) and SOM (University of Groningen). All these research schools are accredited by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW). The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a review of Professor Slawomir Magala’s contributions as editor of Journal of Organizational Change Management.

Findings

Slawomir (Slawek) Magala will be known for many contributions to social, organizational, managerial research, and it will be remembered that he has created a great legacy in the field of cross-cultural competence and communication on processes of sense making in professional bureaucracies. He has authored and co-authored many publications including articles, books, professional publications, book contributions and other outputs, and is an established professor of cross-cultural management at the Department of Organization and Personnel Management in RSM, Erasmus University. He will be known for his work as editor of Qualitative Sociology Review, and one of the founding members of the Association for Cross-Cultural Competence in Management, not to mention the Journal of Organizational Change Management. Many of his articles have appeared regularly in leading refereed journals, such as the European Journal of International Management, Public Policy, Critical Perspectives on International Business and Human Resources Development International. His greatest legacy is in the field of cross-cultural management, but branches out to many other management studies.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to his work in capacity of editor of Journal of Organizational Change Management.

Practical implications

This review provides a guide for positive role model of an excellent editorship of a journal.

Social implications

Magala’s legacy acknowledges this research and its power to create numerous papers and attract a lot of attention (Flory and Magala, 2014). Because of these conferences, these empirical findings have led to disseminating the conference findings with JOCM (Flory and Magala, 2014). According to them, narrative research has become a respectable research method, but they also feel that it is still burdened with a lot of controversies on with difficulties linked to applying it across different disciplines (Flory and Magala, 2014).

Originality/value

The review covers the creative accomplishment of Professor Magala as editor.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part

Johnnieque Blackmon (Johnnie) Love

This chapter explores the role of librarianship, mentoring, leadership, community outreach, professional organizations, and change when infused with positive…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter explores the role of librarianship, mentoring, leadership, community outreach, professional organizations, and change when infused with positive administrative leadership. These elements are explored because they increase the likelihood of a positive climate for assessment of diversity, inclusion, and implementation of diversity initiatives in libraries. The chapter also examines cultural issues that impact the inclusiveness in libraries as well as identifies the barriers that leave an indelible imprint that institutional racism creates when the library’s effort to deliver quality services to users is in doubt. The author takes a cathartic look at her education, career trajectory, professional development, and how she has come to value her purpose and survival of 51 years in the profession.

Methodology/approach

Using as a lens for change in the profession, the author traces her career in K-12 schools, community college, and academic libraries in times of both segregation and integration.

Findings

Through the metaphor of “stepping back in order to move forward,” the author demonstrates best practices that can be taken by libraries, library professionals, and community organizations toward progress in terms of diversity and inclusion. The author also explores pioneers of color and has used their lives as models for training future librarians. Walking in the “back door” and going through the hotel kitchen has never been a positive example of appreciation for a professional as they make monumental contributions to serve the library profession. Our pioneers endured to serve as “lights” in spite of societal obstacles.

Details

Celebrating the James Partridge Award: Essays Toward the Development of a More Diverse, Inclusive, and Equitable Field of Library and Information Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-933-9

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Book part

Dayo F. Gore

This article examines the early post-World War II civil rights organizing of black women radicals affiliated with the organized left. It details the work of these women in…

Abstract

This article examines the early post-World War II civil rights organizing of black women radicals affiliated with the organized left. It details the work of these women in such organizations as the Civil Rights Congress and Freedom newspaper as they fought to challenge the unjust conviction and sentencing of black defendants caught in the racial machinations of U.S. local and state criminal justice systems. These campaigns against what was provocatively called “legal lynching” formed a cornerstone of African American civil rights activism in the early postwar years. In centering the civil rights politics and organizing of these black women radicals, a more detailed picture emerges of the Communist Party-supported anti-legal lynching campaigns. Such a perspective moves beyond a view of civil rights legal activism as solely the work of lawyers, to examining the ways committed activists within the U.S. left, helped to build this legal activism and sustain an important left base in the U.S. during the Cold War.

Details

Crime and Punishment: Perspectives from the Humanities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-245-0

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Article

Jennifer Scanlon‐Mogel and Karen Roberto

Using a life course perspective, we identified perceived events, transitions and trajectories in older adults' lives that contributed to and inhibited continuous…

Abstract

Using a life course perspective, we identified perceived events, transitions and trajectories in older adults' lives that contributed to and inhibited continuous participation in physical activities and exercise at three stages of their lives (ie, young adulthood, middle adulthood, late adulthood). In‐depth interviews with nine men and six women provided an understanding of how societal processes and opportunities, life course roles and transitions and individual meanings of physical exercise influenced the older adults' perceptions of and current participation in physical activity and exercise.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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Book part

Velma Pijalović and Amra Kapo

The fact that per capita energy consumption in non-OECD (The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries makes up only 30% of average consumption in…

Abstract

The fact that per capita energy consumption in non-OECD (The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries makes up only 30% of average consumption in OECD countries, as well as the fact that highly efficient technologies and equipment have been available for many years in developed countries where energy efficiency is one of the top priorities, has often been cited as an argument in favour of the claim that energy efficiency is relevant only for highly developed countries. In this chapter, we attempt to establish if and why this opinion is wrong in the case of Western Balkans (WB6). Evident lack of interest in this area which we identified through analysis of available literature was an important motive for the consideration of the issue of energy efficiency in WB6 countries.

Analysing the basic macroeconomic and energy indicators for WB6 countries and their comparison with indicators for European Union (EU) member countries, we found that all countries have the potential benefit from implementation of energy efficiency and conservation projects. Besides the possible energy savings, wider socio-economic benefits in WB6 countries include harmonization with EU regulations, reduced dependence on import and thus reduced risk of price shocks and potential reduction of trade deficit, creation of jobs, health benefits, better productivity and improved competitiveness.

However, realizing the full potential of energy efficiency requires removal of many financial, institutional, technical and behavioural barriers, whereby WB6 countries can use the help of institutions which provide technical assistance and funds, beside measures which fall under jurisdiction of governments.

Details

Green Economy in the Western Balkans
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-499-6

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Abstract

Details

Cultural Competence in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-772-0

Content available
Book part

Jerry Dear

National cultural heritage months often highlight superficial elements such as food, arts, crafts, and music, but behind these celebrations lie generations of pioneers who…

Abstract

National cultural heritage months often highlight superficial elements such as food, arts, crafts, and music, but behind these celebrations lie generations of pioneers who have shaped the historical and cultural heritage of America. Over the past seven years, in championing cultural awareness, the San Francisco Public Library has collaborated with the Asian American Studies Department at San Francisco State University, The Association of Chinese Teachers, and other community organizations to commemorate Asian Pacific Islander American (APIA) Heritage Month every year in May. This annual program illustrates how efforts led by APIAs have contributed to the historical, cultural, and literary landscape of America, affording them the recognition they deserve. Multicollaborative efforts led to the creation of a premiere APIA Biography Project (apiabiography.sfsu.edu) – a digital repository of instructional resources that educators across the nation can adapt to their curriculum. By bridging collaboration, public engagement, and community partnerships, public libraries unify multiple constituencies to educate the public on the diverse communities they serve.

Details

Hope and a Future: Perspectives on the Impact that Librarians and Libraries Have on Our World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-642-1

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Article

The staffing of the county libraries proceeds apace and all kinds of appointments are reported. It is rumoured that a retired army man has been selected in one case and a…

Abstract

The staffing of the county libraries proceeds apace and all kinds of appointments are reported. It is rumoured that a retired army man has been selected in one case and a school teacher in another, both of whom, without special library experience, will be entrusted with the organisation of their respective library schemes. It is further reported that a discussion among Directors of Education brought forth the opinion that trained men were not necessary on these jobs, “men of commonsense” being preferred.

Details

New Library World, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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