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Article

Evelyne Toe, Adjéhi Dadié, Etienne Dako, Guillaume Loukou, Marcelin Koffi Dje and Y.C. Blé

Vegetable salads, despite their recognized health benefits, are an increasingly common cause of foodborne illness worldwide. The purpose of this paper is to determine the…

Abstract

Purpose

Vegetable salads, despite their recognized health benefits, are an increasingly common cause of foodborne illness worldwide. The purpose of this paper is to determine the prevalence of E. coli with virulence genes in ready-to-eat raw mixed vegetable salads sold in collective catering in Abidjan.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 436 strains of E. coli were isolated from 306 ready-to-eat raw mixed vegetables salads and then identified biochemically and molecularly based on the uidA gene responsible for beta-glucuronidase activity. The virulence genes were determined by polymerase chain reaction.

Findings

The prevalence in vegetable salads of E. coli with virulence genes was 35.3 percent. The distribution of pathovars was 21.2 percent enterotoxigenic (ETEC), 4.9 percent enteropathogenic (EPEC), 0.7 percent Shigatoxigenic (STEC), and 7.5 percent Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC). It appears from the study that vegetable salads sold in collective catering in Abidjan are at risk for contamination by E. coli pathovars.

Originality/value

Processing conditions for these salads during preparation appear to be hygienically insufficient, so measures to control the risk of contamination are necessary.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Marieke Nijmeijer, Anthony Worsley and Brian Astill

A short questionnaire was completed by 276 South Australian consumers, which examined postulated relationships between personal values, food lifestyle, demographics and…

Abstract

A short questionnaire was completed by 276 South Australian consumers, which examined postulated relationships between personal values, food lifestyle, demographics and their usual consumption of 24 vegetables. Principal components analyses showed that consumers' vegetable consumption could be divided into several categories, most notably salad and boiled vegetables. In multiple regression analyses different sets of values and lifestyle factors predicted intakes of overall vegetable (Rsq=27 per cent), salad (16 per cent) and boiled (27 per cent) vegetables. Path analysis revealed a complex set of pathways leading from values and personal demographics through motives, perceived food attributes and cooking skills to consumption. These partly confirmed the food lifestyle model proposed by Grunert et al. The findings show that vegetable consumption has a number of contextual and cognitive antecedents but strongly suggest that other likely predictive variables require investigation.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 106 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Sana Ilyas, Muhammad Usman Qamar, Muhammad Hidayat Rasool, Nazia Abdulhaq and Zeeshan Nawaz

– The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the frequency and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of pathogens present in ready-to-eat salads available at a local market.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the frequency and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of pathogens present in ready-to-eat salads available at a local market.

Design/methodology/approach

A 100 salad samples were collected aseptically. Each sample (25 g) was homogenized in 225 ml of sterile peptone water and was serially diluted up to 1×106. Dilutions were inoculated on nutrient agar by surface spread plate technique. Aerobic colony count (ACC) was estimated by counting the colonies. Bacterial isolates were cultured on blood and MacConkey agar and identified on the basis of their morphology, culture characteristics and confirmed by API 20E and 20NE. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined as per CLSI 2014.

Findings

ACC range was 1.1×103 cfu/g to 5.8×109 cfu/g. Among these the highest ACC was found in channa chat (4.9×104 to 5.8×109 cfu/g). A total of 127 microorganisms were identified; 73 were gram negative rods (GNRs) and 24 were gram positive cocci (GPC). Among GNRs; Klebsiella spp. (n=18) was the predominant whereas among GPC, Staphylococcus aureus (n=6) were the chief pathogen. Klebsiella spp. showed 100 percent resistance to ampicillin, 89-78 percent to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and 33 percent to imipenem, however, Enterobacter spp. were resistant to ampicillin (100 percent) amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (77 percent) and imipenem (23 percent). Staphylococcus aureus showed resistance to co-amoxiclav (83 percent) and penicillin (75 percent).

Practical implications

This study revealed that effective control measures must been implemented and respected by throughout the entire food chain and better surveillance studies should be performed at national level to reduce the spread of bacteria by fresh salads.

Originality/value

This paper explore the high prevalence of multidrug-resistant pathogens in different salads and most of the salads were found to be unhygienic for consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Leo Paul Dana

This case is about Korean Air Lines’ innovative idea to adopt a policy of vertical integration in catering. Rather than out‐source its in‐flight catering, this airline has…

Abstract

This case is about Korean Air Lines’ innovative idea to adopt a policy of vertical integration in catering. Rather than out‐source its in‐flight catering, this airline has moved away from industry norms, and is doing its own thing – literally.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 101 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

David Marshall, Annie S. Anderson, Mike Lean and Ann Foster

Scotland has a poor diet‐related health record and part of the drive toimprove Scottish diet has focused attention on increasing fruit andvegetable consumption. Despite…

Abstract

Scotland has a poor diet‐related health record and part of the drive to improve Scottish diet has focused attention on increasing fruit and vegetable consumption. Despite various attempts, consumption remains well below World Health Organisation (WHO) recommendations. Consumer confusion and complacency towards diet are apparent and the relationship between knowledge about good diet and behaviour is unclear. Highlights the need to consider how consumers make choices. Diet and health are not regarded as a problem for the majority of Scots but the major barriers to increasing consumption of fruit and vegetables reflect the additional costs incurred and the somewhat limited role for these products in Scottish cuisine. Indicates that price incentives and emphasis on the healthy benefits of eating more fruit and vegetables appear to be the most likely to succeed in increasing consumption; but there appear to be more opportunities to increase fruit as opposed to vegetable consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 96 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Suzi Leather

Opens by identifying fruit and vegetable consumption differencesbetween socio‐economic groups in Britain. Goes on to outline currentunderstanding of antioxidants and the…

Abstract

Opens by identifying fruit and vegetable consumption differences between socio‐economic groups in Britain. Goes on to outline current understanding of antioxidants and the role they have in preventing or stemming disease processes. Explores factors which determine consumption of fruit and vegetables across all social groups, before considering in detail the impact of inadequate income. Considers the relationship between smoking, low income and fruit and vegetable consumption and notes that despite increased antioxidant requirements smokers on low income exhibit lower levels of consumption. Rejects the notion that such purchasing patterns are irrational in the circumstances and concludes that a national healthy diet policy, particularly one which increases the consumption of fruit and vegetables, cannot be dissociated from social protection.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 97 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Jean Kennedy, Sarah Gibney, Aisling Nolan, Stephen O'Brien, M. Ann S. McMahon, David McDowell, Seamus Fanning and Patrick G. Wall

The International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene's (IFH) approach to infectious disease prevention is “targeted hygiene”, which means identifying the routes of…

Abstract

Purpose

The International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene's (IFH) approach to infectious disease prevention is “targeted hygiene”, which means identifying the routes of transmission of infection in the home and community, and targeting hygiene measures at “critical points” (CPs) to break the chain of transmission. This paper aims to identify and prioritise CPs in the home kitchen environment during food preparation in order to inform food safety campaigns.

Design/methodology/approach

This study involved: filming participants (n=60) while they prepared a meal according to a specified recipe (30 beef/salad burgers and 30 chicken salads); swabbing key potential contamination sites in the participant's kitchen for microbiological testing; sampling the meat and salad components of the cooked meal for microbiological testing; visual inspection and temperature check of the meat after cooking; and administering a survey of knowledge, attitudes and demographic factors.

Findings

This study has identified the critical points (CPs) during domestic food preparation as: CP1: correct cooking practices; CP2: prevention of cross‐contamination; and CP3: correct food storage practices. Statistically significant links were found between food safety knowledge and behaviour as well as between food safety attitudes and demographic factors.

Originality/value

This is the first study to link all aspects of observed consumer food safety practices in the home to food safety knowledge, attitudes, perceptions, psychosocial and demographic factors to identify these CPs.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Umezuruike Linus Opara and Majeed R. Al‐Ani

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the difference in antioxidant contents of pre‐packed fresh‐cut and whole fruit and vegetables as sold in the market.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the difference in antioxidant contents of pre‐packed fresh‐cut and whole fruit and vegetables as sold in the market.

Design/methodology/approach

Samples of pre‐packed fresh‐cut fruit and vegetables as well as whole produce were collected from the market in Muscat and Oman, and analyzed for vitamin C, lycopene and total carotenoids. Analysis of variance was carried out to determine the level of statistical differences between fresh‐cut and whole fruit and vegetables.

Findings

In both fruit and vegetables, vitamin C contents are higher in whole than fresh‐cut produce, with greater reductions in vitamin C contents of fresh‐cut vegetables than fruit. In both fresh‐cut and whole fruit, lycopene content is 30‐36 times higher in watermelon than the contents of other fruit genotypes studied. Similarly, total carotenoids content of watermelon is six to 21 times higher than other types of fruit studied. Both lycopene and total carotenoids content are higher in whole than fresh‐cut fruit, except in pineapple fruit. In both fresh‐cut and whole vegetables, lycopene content of carrot is three to four times higher than cucumber, and four to six times higher than celery. Implications of these results on public health policy are discussed.

Originality/value

Previous studies on quality of fresh‐cut produce are based on controlled experimental studies using samples of produce from the same batch to compare fresh‐cut versus whole produce. However, consumers in retails stores often have to make a choice between pre‐packed fresh‐cut or whole (un‐cut) produce, which are not usually from the same source or batch. It is therefore essential to understand the differences in nutritional value of whole and pre‐packed fresh‐cuts sold in the market.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 112 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Irene A. Baxter and Monika J.A. Schroder

Discusses the factors shaping Scottish children’s perceptions of vegetables as a means of explaining their low vegetable consumption. Examines the impact that sensory…

Abstract

Discusses the factors shaping Scottish children’s perceptions of vegetables as a means of explaining their low vegetable consumption. Examines the impact that sensory factors, the child’s family and eating experiences, and environmental factors (i.e. socio‐economic factors/income, culture, eating patterns and advertising) have on children’s vegetable consumption. Additionally, makes suggestions for strategies to overcome some of these factors which affect children’s low consumption of vegetables.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 99 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

B. Franchini, R. Poínhos, K. Klepp and M.D.V. de Almeida

This paper's aim is to assess vegetable soup intake and its contribution to total vegetable intake among mothers of Portuguese schoolchildren as well as to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper's aim is to assess vegetable soup intake and its contribution to total vegetable intake among mothers of Portuguese schoolchildren as well as to examine the association between relative vegetable soup intake and sociodemographic characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐sectional survey was carried out in Portugal as part of the Pro Children study. In total 1,673 women, mothers of 11‐13 year old children, took part in the study. The vegetable intake and sociodemographic characteristics were collected with a self‐administered questionnaire in which a precoded 24‐hour recall was applied. The analysed sociodemographic characteristics were the number of people and composition of household, educational level, social class and region of residence. The associations between preferential or exclusive consumer mothers of vegetable soup (i.e. ≥50 per cent of total vegetable intake) and sociodemographic characteristics were analysed by a logistic regression model.

Findings

The mean intake of vegetable soup was 76.1 g/d and its contribution to total vegetable intake was approximately 45 per cent. The percentage of mothers that were preferential or exclusive consumers of vegetable soup was 41 per cent. Preferential or exclusive vegetable soup intake was less likely among mothers when the number of people in the household was less than four (vs 4; OR: 0.734, 95 per cent CI: 0.577‐0.934) and that did not live with their spouse/partner (OR: 0.617, 95 per cent CI: 0.424‐0.878).

Originality/value

The paper focuses on the consumption of vegetable soup, a traditional culinary preparation among Portuguese people. Also, it identifies factors associated with its consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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