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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1986

The times have come down to us as the “Good Old Days”, of Edwardian elegance and grace, peace and plenty, which conceal the poverty, squalor and disease. There seemed less…

Abstract

The times have come down to us as the “Good Old Days”, of Edwardian elegance and grace, peace and plenty, which conceal the poverty, squalor and disease. There seemed less resentment from those who suffered the rigours of the times than from those of today who only know of them by repute. Life was indeed cruel to the submerged tenth of society and the homeless waifs and strays were all too real and true.

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British Food Journal, vol. 88 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1976

The Report of the Royal College of Physicians (London) and the British Cardiac Society issued in April last was the product of a joint working party, whose aim was to…

Abstract

The Report of the Royal College of Physicians (London) and the British Cardiac Society issued in April last was the product of a joint working party, whose aim was to formulate the best possible advice which can at present be given to medical practitioners towards the prevention of coronary heart disease. It caused quite a stir, particularly its dietary recommendations, and the mass media made the most of it, more from inferences drawn from the measures recommended than from the report itself. Now that the sensation of it has gone and the dust has begun to settle, we can see the Report contains nothing that is new; it tells us what we have long known. Like the Horsemen of the Apocalypse, except that there are three of them, at least for the moment, the causative factors of the rising incidence of coronary heart disease, built into our affluent society, have been working their way at the heart of man for a good many years now.

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British Food Journal, vol. 78 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1980

The lengthy review of the Food Standards Committee of this, agreed by all public analysts and enforcement officers, as the most complicated and difficult of food groups…

Abstract

The lengthy review of the Food Standards Committee of this, agreed by all public analysts and enforcement officers, as the most complicated and difficult of food groups subject to detailed legislative control, is at last complete and the Committee's findings set out in their Report. When in 1975 they were requested to investigate the workings of the legislation, the problems of control were already apparent and getting worse. The triology of Regulations of 1967 seemed comprehensive at the time, perhaps as we ventured to suggest a little too comprehensive for a rational system of control for arguments on meat contents of different products, descriptions and interpretation generally quickly appeared. The system, for all its detail, provided too many loopholes through which manufacturers drove the proverbial “carriage and pair”. As meat products have increased in range and the constantly rising price of meat, the “major ingredient”, the number of samples taken for analysis has risen and now usually constitutes about one‐quarter of the total for the year, with sausages, prepared meats (pies, pasties), and most recently, minced meat predominating. Just as serial sampling and analysis of sausages before the 1967 Regulations were pleaded in courts to establish usage in the matter of meat content, so with minced meat the same methods are being used to establish a maximum fat content usage. What concerns food law enforcement agencies is that despite the years that the standards imposed by the 1967 Regulations have been in force, the number of infringements show no sign of reduction. This should not really surprise us; there are even longer periods of failures to comply; eg., in the use of preservatives which have been controlled since 1925! What a number of public analysts have christened the “beefburger saga” took its rise post‐1967 and shows every indication of continuing into the distant future. Manufacturers appear to be trying numerous ploys to reduce the content below the Regulation 80% mainly by giving their products new names. Each year, public analysts report a flux of new names and ingenious defences; eg, “caterburgers” and similar concocted nomenclature, and the defence that because the name does not incorporate a meat, it is outside the statutory standard.

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British Food Journal, vol. 82 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1900

The necessity of standards of purity for certain kinds of agricultural produce being now recognised by the new Adulteration Act—4, (1)—no apology is needed for attempting…

Abstract

The necessity of standards of purity for certain kinds of agricultural produce being now recognised by the new Adulteration Act—4, (1)—no apology is needed for attempting to bring the application of the principle into actual practice. Some few standards have already been generally adopted, and the legalization of limits relating to many of those substances with which the Adulteration Acts deal would undoubtedly be welcomed.

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British Food Journal, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

The earliest law of the adulteration of food imposed divisions among the local authorities of the day in functions and enforcements; most of the urban and rural sanitary…

Abstract

The earliest law of the adulteration of food imposed divisions among the local authorities of the day in functions and enforcements; most of the urban and rural sanitary authorities possessed no power under the law. Provisions dealing with unfit food — diseased, unsound, unwholesome or unfit for human food — were not in the first sale of food and drugs measure and there duties were wholly discharged by all local authorities. Rural sanitary authorities were excluded from food and drugs law and boroughs and urban authorities severly restricted. Enforcement in the rural areas was by the county council, although local officers were empowered to take samples of food and submit them for analysis to the public analyst. Power to appoint the public analyst for the area was the main criterion of a “food and drugs authority”. The Minister had power to direct an authority with a population of less than 40,000 but more than 20,000 to enforce the law of adulteration.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 86 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Vanessa Martins Hissanaga-Himelstein, Rossana Pacheco da Costa Proença and Jane Mara Block

The purpose of this paper is to compare the trans fatty acids (TFA) content in foods before and after the implementing of the method for controlling trans fatty acids in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the trans fatty acids (TFA) content in foods before and after the implementing of the method for controlling trans fatty acids in meals (MCTM) in a Brazilian restaurant.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis by gas chromatography was performed on 49 processed foods used as ingredients for culinary preparations (42 and seven samples before and after the implementation of the method, respectively) and 57 prepared foods (31 and 26 samples before and after the implementation of the method, respectively). In addition, the meal preparation process was monitored before the implementation of the MCTM method in order to identify the changes resulting from its application.

Findings

As a result of the application of the method the processed foods whose labels reported the presence of ingredients potentially containing industrial trans fat acids (iTFA) were not purchased and used in food preparations; standard recipes prepared with processed foods free of iTFA were implemented; and also the restaurant’s staff were trained to control the frying process for preparing fried foods. The average content of TFA per 100 g of prepared food was 0.21 g less (p=0.038) after the implementation of the method.

Practical implications

The MCTM method showed to be a viable and effective tool for reducing TFA levels in the studied restaurant.

Originality/value

The developed method is original since no similar tool for controlling of TFA in food services has been found in the scientific literature. The fatty acid profile determination in the meals prepared after the MCTM implementation showed a reduction in TFA, indicating that the method was also viable and efficient.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1982

Maintaining an adequate nutritional state, important at all times, is never more so than during the dark days of Winter. The body reserves are then taxed in varying…

Abstract

Maintaining an adequate nutritional state, important at all times, is never more so than during the dark days of Winter. The body reserves are then taxed in varying degrees of severity by sudden downward plunges of the thermometer, days when there is no sight of the sun, lashing rains and cold winds, ice, frost, snow, gales and blizzards. The body processes must be maintained against these onslaughts of nature — body temperatures, resistance against infections, a state of well‐being with all systems operating and an ability to “take it”. A sufficient and well balanced diet is vital to all this, most would say, the primarily significant factor. The National Food Surveys do not demonstrate any insufficiency in the national diet in terms of energy values, intake of vitamins, minerals and nutrients, but statistics can be fallacious amd misleading. NFS statistics are no indication of quality of food, its sufficiency for physiological purposes and to meet the economic stresses of the times. The intake of staple foods — bread, milk, butter, meat, &c., — have been slowly declining for years, as their prices rise higher and higher. If the Government had foreseen the massive unemployment problem, it is doubtful if they would have crippled the highly commendable School Meals Service. To have continued this — school milk, school dinners — even with the financial help it would have required would be seen as a “Supplementary Benefit” much better than the uncontrolled cash flow of social security. Child nutrition must be suffering. Stand outside a school at lunch‐time and watch the stream of children trailing along to the “Chippie” for a handfull of chip potatoes; even making a “meal” on an ice lollie.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 84 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1978

Statements by Lord Denning, M.R., vividly describing the impact of European Community Legislation are increasingly being used by lawyers and others to express their…

Abstract

Statements by Lord Denning, M.R., vividly describing the impact of European Community Legislation are increasingly being used by lawyers and others to express their concern for its effect not only on our legal system but on other sectors of our society, changes which all must accept and to which they must adapt. A popular saying of the noble Lord is “The Treaty is like an incoming tide. It flows into the estuaries and up the rivers. It cannot be held back”. The impact has more recently become impressive in food law but probably less so than in commerce or industry, with scarcely any sector left unmolested. Most of the EEC Directives have been implemented by regulations made under the appropriate sections of the Food and Drugs Act, 1955 and the 1956 Act for Scotland, but regulations proposed for Materials and Articles in Contact with Food (reviewed elsewhere in this issue) will be implemented by use of Section 2 (2) of the European Communities Act, 1972, which because it applies to the whole of the United Kingdom, will not require separate regulations for England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. This is the first time that a food regulation has been made under this statute. S.2 (2) authorises any designated Minister or Department to make regulations as well as Her Majesty Orders in Council for implementing any Community obligation, enabling any right by virtue of the Treaties (of Rome) to be excercised. The authority extends to all forms of subordinate legislation—orders, rules, regulations or other instruments and cannot fail to be of considerable importance in all fields including food law.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 80 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1952

C. GRIFFITHS

The animal and vegetable oils, fats, and waxes provide vital raw materials for a large number of industries. Soap, paint, foodstuffs, textiles, leather, and linoleum are…

Abstract

The animal and vegetable oils, fats, and waxes provide vital raw materials for a large number of industries. Soap, paint, foodstuffs, textiles, leather, and linoleum are but a few of the diversity of products which employ one or more of this large class of natural bodies.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2018

Meena Goswami, B.D. Sharma, S.K. Mendiratta and Vikas Pathak

This study aims to evaluate the quality characteristics of low-fat functional carabeef cookies incorporated with different levels of guar gum.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the quality characteristics of low-fat functional carabeef cookies incorporated with different levels of guar gum.

Design/methodology/approach

Meat cookies were incorporated with 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 per cent guar gum powder to replace 20, 30 and 40 per cent hydrogenated vegetable fat, respectively. The formulation of low-fat carabeef cookies was maintained by addition of water.

Findings

There was a significant difference (p < 0.02) between control and treatments for all physico-chemical properties, except pH and thickness. The cooking yield increased significantly (p < 0.04) at 1.5 per cent level of guar gum. Moisture, protein and ash percentage increased significantly (p < 0.02) while there was significant (p < 0.00) reduction in fat percentage. The diameter and spread ratio of cookies decreased significantly (p < 0.03) with incorporation of guar gum. The sensory scores were not significantly affected with respect to color and appearance, flavor, texture, crispiness, aftertaste and overall acceptability at 1.5 per cent level. There was no significant difference in hardness and adhesiveness values, as well as color parameters.

Research limitations/implications

The experiment can be further carried out to evaluate complete product profile and storage stability of product under different packaging conditions.

Originality/value

Fat imparts richness and tenderness, improving flavor and mouth feel to processed meat products, but higher fat consumption may lead to various life style diseases. Reducing fat content with fat replacers in meat cookies without affecting the sensory characteristics may be a significant challenge. Guar gum powder may be an excellent option at 1.5 per cent level to replace 40 per cent of hydrogenated vegetable fat without compromising quality attributes.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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