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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Vaughan C. Judd and Betty J. Tims

Although some institutions of higher learning seem to have difficulty acknowledging it, teaching should be the single most important part of their mission; it is a college…

Abstract

Although some institutions of higher learning seem to have difficulty acknowledging it, teaching should be the single most important part of their mission; it is a college or university's reason for being. Accordingly, the primary mission of an academic library should be to support the teaching mission of the university. For example, in three college libraries with successful bibliographic instruction (BI) programs, library directors viewed the teaching role of the library as central to the purpose of the library. Teaching support from the library, and interaction between the library staff and the university's teaching faculty and students, can come in a variety of ways, one of which is BI. Bibliographic instruction is an activity that bridges the gap between academicians and librarians. Although BI can be generic or integrated (subject‐specific), the latter seems to offer greater potential for close interaction between librarians and the teaching faculty. Course‐integrated BI has been described as bibliographic instruction designed as a part of course objectives, and viewed as essential to knowledge of the subject and successful completion of the course. This article describes a series of four unique workshops that meet this definition of course‐integrated bibliographic instruction.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Vaughan C. Judd

There have been scant references in the marketing literature to conceptualizing an organization's employees as an element of the organization's marketing mix. Extending…

Abstract

There have been scant references in the marketing literature to conceptualizing an organization's employees as an element of the organization's marketing mix. Extending previous conceptualizations of employees in a business marketing and a nonprofit marketing context, it is proposed that all organizations have the ability to move beyond their traditional view of employees in order to capitalize on “people‐power” as a distinctive element of their marketing mixes; an element that can help them become customer‐oriented to gain a competitive advantage through differentiation and to deliver customer value. To do so presents a real managerial challenge for any organization. It is a challenge worth undertaking, however, because successful implementation will help an organization achieve a customer‐orientation and more effectively meet the needs of its customers.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 37 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Betty J. Tims and Vaughan C. Judd

Reference and document librarians are increasingly faced with questions about international marketing as a result of globalization. Knowing where to look for specialized…

Abstract

Reference and document librarians are increasingly faced with questions about international marketing as a result of globalization. Knowing where to look for specialized information of this kind can be a daunting task. While the focus of this paper is to describe an international marketing workshop, the sources described and the types of questions raised in the workshop can be helpful to busy reference librarians. This paper describes four US government sources that are available in electronic format. Using these electronic sources, librarians can quickly answer a variety of questions, or show patrons how they can find information free of charge.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Vaughan C. Judd, Lucy I. Farrow and Betty J. Tims

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the attempt to find an evaluation instrument for undergraduate students to use to evaluate public web sites, the analysis of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the attempt to find an evaluation instrument for undergraduate students to use to evaluate public web sites, the analysis of the variety of instruments discovered, the subsequent development of an appropriate instrument, and the application of the instrument in workshops with students.

Design/methodology/approach

The instrument was created based on the following criteria that the authors determined would meet the students' needs. It focuses exclusively on the information aspect of a web site, has some basis in theory or is based on an accepted model, is parsimonious, is quantitative, with both absolute and relative measures, and indicates whether or not the information should be accepted or rejected. The instrument was also developed with the goal of focusing on the process rather than the outcome.

Findings

Although a number of diverse evaluation instruments from the literature and from web‐based sources were examined, none was deemed suitable for students to use so the authors developed their own.

Originality/value

The authors concurred that, based on their assessment of the learning environment, the focus of an instrument should be on evaluation as a process.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

Betty J. Tims

Over the years much has been written about integrated library instruction and its importance as a viable, effective method of bibliographic instruction. Indeed, a study by…

Abstract

Over the years much has been written about integrated library instruction and its importance as a viable, effective method of bibliographic instruction. Indeed, a study by Judith Pask showed that eighty‐eight percent of the academic libraries surveyed were using integrated library instruction. There is, however, a form of integrated library instruction, team teaching, about which little has been written. For purposes of this paper, team teaching is defined as a team composed of a professional librarian and an academic faculty member teaching the same course. A review of the literature over the past two decades showed only one reference to team teaching. Porter, Lanning, and Warner discussed a team teaching experience in which a chemistry professor and librarian alternately lectured in a one‐hour credit course with one instructor present at a time in the classroom. However, there is a type of team teaching, which this author has designated as interactive team teaching, to which no references in the literature were found. Interactive team teaching is defined as two instructors from different disciplines in the classroom at the same time. A case study of interactive team teaching follows.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 10 July 2014

To explain how the components of attraction theory work in unison to prompt students to take an initial stimulus and progress through critical thinking processes and into…

Abstract

Purpose

To explain how the components of attraction theory work in unison to prompt students to take an initial stimulus and progress through critical thinking processes and into knowledge acquisition, organization, and synthesis.

Design/methodology/approach

Although schema theory has an important role in understanding knowledge acquisition, it does not provide directives for how to plan instruction so students can build their understandings and comprehension of subject matter. This chapter outlines a pedagogical approach to the implementation of a new theory of learning that builds on cognitive science, affect, and interest.

Findings

Students can become re-attracted to learning through effective teaching inclusive of a jolt, curiosity, retrieving explanations, counterexamples, clarifications, and embedding that information within schemata.

Practical implications

Proactive investigations and continued research on attraction theory can enrich our understanding of teaching and learning, provide answers for what works in the classroom, and equip us with tools from which to select for unique classroom circumstances.

Details

Theoretical Models of Learning and Literacy Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-821-1

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1949

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing…

Abstract

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing fields but who have a common interest in the means by which information may be collected and disseminated to the greatest advantage. Lists of its members have, therefore, a more than ordinary value since they present, in miniature, a cross‐section of institutions and individuals who share this special interest.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1949

Forty‐six milks were submitted for analysis. Five of these were reported against for added water or fat deficiency. The leaky churn appeared on the scene in one case, but…

Abstract

Forty‐six milks were submitted for analysis. Five of these were reported against for added water or fat deficiency. The leaky churn appeared on the scene in one case, but this did not save the vendor from fine and costs amounting to over thirteen pounds.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 51 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1900

There are very few individuals who have studied the question of weights and measures who do not most strongly favour the decimal system. The disadvantages of the weights…

Abstract

There are very few individuals who have studied the question of weights and measures who do not most strongly favour the decimal system. The disadvantages of the weights and measures at present in use in the United Kingdom are indeed manifold. At the very commencement of life the schoolboy is expected to commit to memory the conglomerate mass of facts and figures which he usually refers to as “Tables,” and in this way the greater part of twelve months is absorbed. And when he has so learned them, what is the result? Immediately he leaves school he forgets the whole of them, unless he happens to enter a business‐house in which some of them are still in use; and it ought to be plain that the case would be very different were all our weights and measures divided or multiplied decimally. Instead of wasting twelve months, the pupil would almost be taught to understand the decimal system in two or three lessons, and so simple is the explanation that he would never be likely to forget it. There is perhaps no more interesting, ingenious and useful example of the decimal system than that in use in France. There the standard of length is the metre, the standard of capacity the cubic decimetre or the litre, while one cubic centimetre of distilled water weighs exactly one gramme, the standard of weight. Thus the measures of length, capacity and weight are most closely and usefully related. In the present English system there is absolutely no relationship between these weights and measures. Frequently a weight or measure bearing the same name has a different value for different bodies. Take, for instance, the stone; for dead meat its value is 8 pounds, for live meat 14 pounds; and other instances will occur to anyone who happens to remember his “Tables.” How much simpler for the business man to reckon in multiples of ten for everything than in the present confusing jumble. Mental arithmetic in matters of buying and selling would become much easier, undoubtedly more accurate, and the possibility of petty fraud be far more remote, because even the most dense could rapidly calculate by using the decimal system.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 2 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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