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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Michael Wang

The purpose of this paper is to present an empirical evidence of the impacts of supply chain uncertainty and risk on the logistics performance in the Australian courier…

2093

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an empirical evidence of the impacts of supply chain uncertainty and risk on the logistics performance in the Australian courier industry. This study examines the impacts of supply chain and risk on the logistics performance in the Australian courier industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This study provides an in-depth analysis of supply chain uncertainty and risk’s impacts on the logistics performance. The structure equation modelling approach is applied to examine the relationship between supply chain uncertainty and risk and logistics performance. Company-side uncertainty and risk, customer-side uncertainty and risk, and environment uncertainty and risk are used to measure the impacts of supply chain uncertainty and risk on the industry. This paper gives attention to the supply chain uncertainty and risk in the industry.

Findings

The results indicate that supply chain uncertainty and risk have negative impacts on logistics performance. Moreover, the greatest impact of supply chain uncertainty and risk was from outside company in the Australian courier industry.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on the Australian courier industry, this may limit the implications of findings in different industries. However, the research models may be examined and validated in the different context.

Practical implications

The results may provide directions in the implementation of strategies to manage supply chain uncertainty and risk and improve logistics performance. The findings may enlighten both academics and practitioners to understand and pay attention to the supply chain uncertainty and risk in the courier industry.

Originality/value

There is an argument whether the impacts of supply chain uncertainty and risk are positive or negative in previous studies. In addition, there are very few studies on courier industry. This study clarifies the impacts of supply chain uncertainty and risk on the logistics performance in the courier industry.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Dong-Wook Kwak, Vasco Sanchez Rodrigues, Robert Mason, Stephen Pettit and Anthony Beresford

International supply chains can be severely disrupted by failures in international logistics processes. Therefore, an understanding of international logistics risks, or…

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Abstract

Purpose

International supply chains can be severely disrupted by failures in international logistics processes. Therefore, an understanding of international logistics risks, or causes of failure, how these may interact with each other and how they can be mitigated are imperatives for the smooth operation of international supply chains. The purpose of this paper is to specifically investigate the interactions between international logistics risks within the prevailing structures of international supply chains and highlights how these risks may be inter-connected and amplified. A new dynamic supply chain logistics risk analysis model is proposed which is novel as it provides a holistic understanding of the risk event interactivity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies interpretive structural modelling to data collected from a survey of leading supply chain practitioners, in order to analyse their perspectives of risk elements and interactions. The risk elements and their contextual relationship were derived empirically through the use of focus groups and subsequent Delphi study. The two stages of the research rely on experts’ views on risk events and clusters and the level of interactions among those clusters.

Findings

A key finding of this research is that supply chain practitioner’s perception of risk consists of inter-connected four levels: value streams risks; information and relationship risks; risks in international supply chain activities; and external environment. In particular, since level 2 risk creates feedback loops of risks, risk management at level 2 can dampen the amplification effect and the strength of the interactions.

Practical implications

Several managerial implications are drawn. First, the research guides managers in the identification and evaluation of risk events which can impact the performance of their international logistics supply chain operations. Second, evidence is presented that supports the proposition that the relationships with trading partners and LSPs, and the degree of logistics information exchange, are critical to prevent, or at least mitigate, logistics risks which can substantially affect the responsiveness of the international supply chain.

Originality/value

The main contribution to knowledge that this study offers to the literature on supply chain risk management is the development of a supply chain logistics risk analysis model which includes both risk elements and interactions. The research demonstrates the importance of taking into account risk interactions in the process of identification and evaluation of risk events.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2022

Maneesh Kumar, Madeleine Pullman, Tatiana Bouzdine-Chameeva and Vasco Sanchez Rodrigues

This paper explores how hub-firms in a regional industrial cluster orchestrate resources to enhance the innovation capabilities of member firms and how this role changes…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores how hub-firms in a regional industrial cluster orchestrate resources to enhance the innovation capabilities of member firms and how this role changes as innovation projects develop. The work advances our understanding of how innovation-oriented clusters can drive the collaboration process, support the development of member capabilities and achieve desired outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The research utilises exploratory case studies within an innovation cluster, where a hub-firm brings together different players for specific innovation projects. Using resource orchestration theory, the paper analyses six project cases to reveal the shifting roles and activities related to structuring, bundling and leveraging different resources for innovation capabilities particularly associated with improved quality and reputation for the firms and region.

Findings

The study reveals the important role played by the cluster hub-firm in structuring, bundling and leveraging resources to create and fund project teams. After project formation, a team member takes the role of an orchestrator to bundle further and then leverage the resources to achieve desired outcomes for the team and the region.

Research limitations/implications

This work focuses on a wine industry but has implications for the success orchestration of other regional industrial clusters. Also, the lack of hub-firm interaction during the project process provides an opportunity to consider mechanisms for better guidance of the project team.

Practical implications

There are implications for practitioners for participating in and further improving the collaborative innovative process.

Social implications

Policymakers can benefit from the study as the required practices for stimulating innovation capabilities and economic development in a region are discussed.

Originality/value

This research enhances understanding of the hub-firm's role in a regional cluster not only in orchestrating resources to create collaborative innovation projects but how the role shifts over time.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Maryam Lotfi, Maneesh Kumar, Vasco Sanchez Rodrigues, Mohamed Naim and Irina Harris

This study aims to explore how horizontal collaboration can help small and micro enterprises within the drink sector through the relational theory lens.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how horizontal collaboration can help small and micro enterprises within the drink sector through the relational theory lens.

Design/methodology/approach

The use of qualitative research methods, including focus groups and interviews, facilitated understanding the horizontal collaboration in micro and small companies within the Welsh brewery industry. Data collection involved conducting three focus groups and 13 interviews within the Welsh brewery sector in the UK. The collaboration phenomena were explained using the three elements of relational theory: relational rents, relational capitals and relational governance.

Findings

Micro and small enterprises in the drink sector use collaborative initiatives in building new capabilities to generate relational rents. In addition, relational capitals and relational governance mechanisms were identified to support the horizontal collaboration among these enterprises.

Research limitations/implications

The focus is on only one part of the drinks industry, i.e. the brewery industry; therefore, this study could be extended to other industries within the drink sector or across manufacturing industries.

Practical implications

The micro and small enterprises can collaborate to achieve relational rent, but this collaboration requires strong relational capitals, such as trust. These partners need to change informal governance mechanisms that already exist towards more contractual formal mechanisms.

Originality/value

Prior research has largely focused on vertical collaboration, with limited studies using the relational theory lens to explicate horizontal collaboration phenomena and no previous research in the context of micro and small companies. Relational rents, relational capitals and relational governance mechanisms are studied to provide insights into an effective collaboration in this context.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2020

Vitor William Batista Martins, Rosley Anholon, Vasco Sanchez-Rodrigues, Walter Leal Filho and Osvaldo Luiz Gonçalves Quelhas

Confronting globalization, logistics systems need to achieve greater efficiency in processes to be competitive. Competitiveness is not related only to economic aspects;…

Abstract

Purpose

Confronting globalization, logistics systems need to achieve greater efficiency in processes to be competitive. Competitiveness is not related only to economic aspects; companies need to perform their activities aligned to the triple bottom line concept. In this context, the main objective of this research is to analyze how Brazilian professionals think about sustainable logistics through an exploratory study.

Design/methodology/approach

A set of 33 indicators, compiled from a literature review, was used to develop a research instrument applied in a survey of 50 professionals working with logistics processes in Brazilian companies. First, the Cronbach's alpha was run to verify the questionnaire reliability. Respondents were grouped through cluster hierarchical analysis, and their answers were analyzed through TOPSIS technique.

Findings

The results from the sample analysis showed that Brazilian professionals think in the three dimensions of TBL when considering sustainable logistics systems; however, social aspects are relegated to a second level of importance when compared with environmental and economic indicators. In addition, it is possible to highlight that most important environmental aspects are directly related to economic objectives.

Originality/value

There are few studies examining sustainable logistics system in Brazilian companies that consider the purpose mentioned by evidencing originality in the same way as this current study. The results presented here can contribute to amplifying debates in the theme.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2018

Haiyan Emma Lu, Andrew Potter, Vasco Sanchez Rodrigues and Helen Walker

The implementation of sustainable supply chain management (SCM) calls for an acknowledgement of uncertainty inherent in complex environment. Confucianist society forms…

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Abstract

Purpose

The implementation of sustainable supply chain management (SCM) calls for an acknowledgement of uncertainty inherent in complex environment. Confucianist society forms social networks in Confucianist society, called guanxi networks, influence economic behaviours and business practices in the workplace. The purpose of this study is to explore how these social networks influence the implementation of sustainable SCM. In doing so, this study aims to critically investigate the constructs of guanxi networks, their impact on flow of supply chain capital and how this leverages the implementation of sustainable SCM.

Design/methodology/approach

Two systematic literature reviews are conducted to understand the constructs of social networks in Confucianist culture and their impacts on the flow of supply chain capitals. The reviews also analyse evidence related to the economic, social and environmental practices to reveal the current state of the literature and research gaps. Propositions and a framework are developed to support future research in this area.

Findings

The constructs of ganqing, renqing, xinren and mianzi in guanxi networks have expanded the contexts of social networks in Western literature. Guanxi networks increase the flow of supply chain capital and generate trust between players, thus enhancing capabilities to implement sustainable SCM. Guanxi networks also create the mechanism of network governance with which to increase sustainable SCM implementation under the institutional logics of sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptual framework and justification are based on the reviews of current studies in the field. Future empirical study is encouraged to test the propositions, both in Confucianist culture and other countries with culture of social networks.

Originality/value

Social networks are socially constructed concepts. The constructs of guanxi networks revealed in this study have developed the knowledge of Western-based social network theory. Besides, arguments from a social network perspective provide an alternative answer to explain increased behavioural commitment and companies’ investment in sustainable SCM. This study helps practitioners understand the logic of this social norm and to use it to maximise their operation outputs, including sustainable SCM implementation.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Vasco Sanchez Rodrigues and Andrew Potter

International comparison studies provide a useful opportunity in logistics to benchmark logistics practices. Given this, it is perhaps surprising that there do not appear…

2088

Abstract

Purpose

International comparison studies provide a useful opportunity in logistics to benchmark logistics practices. Given this, it is perhaps surprising that there do not appear to be any benchmarking studies comparing performance between the developed and developing world. The paper aims to address this shortcoming, focusing on fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) distribution networks from the UK and South Africa as comparator countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A two‐stage study has been undertaken. Firstly, a focus group approach was undertaken to identify the main causes of supply chain uncertainty affecting freight transport operations in FMCG distribution. In the second phase, four case studies (two in the UK and two in South Africa) were undertaken to examine how logistics is managed and the impact of uncertainty.

Findings

In the focus groups undertaken in both countries, the uncertainty clusters found were very similar, if not the same. However, when looking into the findings from the case studies, the extra miles generated due to uncertainty within the supply chains studied was greater in the South African distribution networks studied than in their UK counterparts. Furthermore, the UK distribution networks studied seem to be more effective in terms of uncertainty preparedness and responsiveness than their South African counterparts.

Originality/value

The paper has identified significant differences in terms of uncertainty preparedness and responsiveness within the distribution networks studied from the UK and South Africa. Nevertheless, more case studies need to be run in both countries, and in different sectors, to verify those differences.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 May 2010

Vasco SanchezRodrigues, Andrew Potter and Mohamed M. Naim

The purpose of this paper is to verify a transport uncertainty triad model taking a supply chain perspective, and determine which different forms of uncertainty impact on…

5139

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to verify a transport uncertainty triad model taking a supply chain perspective, and determine which different forms of uncertainty impact on transport operations. The aim is to qualitatively evaluate the different types of uncertainty impacting on transport operations rather than estimating the risk that each of them involved. The literature indicates that there are many factors that influence transport operations. This paper aims to determine the key factors that impinge practice.

Design/methodology/approach

On the basis of a literature review, a conceptual model was developed to categorise the different factors that impact on transport operations. In order to determine the credibility of this model and assess which factors are the main barriers to effective transport operations a series of focus groups involving UK logistics practitioners and policy makers was undertaken.

Findings

The findings indicate that the main drivers impacting on transport operations are delays, delivery constraints, lack of coordination, and variable demand/poor information. The consequence of these is to reduce the efficiency of transport operations. Also, in the overall focus groups' data, unplanned road congestion represents the biggest individual issue leading to uncertainty.

Research limitations/implications

The model is refined based only on participants' perceptions. Therefore, further empirical‐based research is needed to quantitatively validate it, for each cluster identifying the frequency with which it occurs and the impact on economic and environmental performance. This will further strengthen understanding of the main uncertainty causes within supply chains in the UK. The model should also be tested through the investigation of real‐world situations, measuring the marginal impact of logistics disruptions, in economic and environmental terms.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the importance of looking at the whole of the logistics triad when dealing with uncertainty, as often there are multiple sources involving the shipper, carrier and customer. Equally, the paper highlights the importance of external factors, and managers need to consider how to deal with these issues. Although the easiest approach is to accommodate them within operational plans, there is scope for engaging with policy makers to identify ways forward.

Originality/value

Many researchers have developed supply chain uncertainty models focusing mainly on manufacturing. Transport has traditionally been considered as a marginal activity within supply chains and it has not been explicitly taken into account in those frameworks. It is necessary to determine the forms of supply chain uncertainty that exist and their impact on transport operations, as they will define the performance of logistics operations.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Vasco Sanchez Rodrigues, John Cowburn, Andrew Potter, Mohamed Naim and Anthony Whiteing

The purpose of this paper is to develop a measure that links the causes and consequences of disruptions in freight transport operations. Such a measure is needed to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a measure that links the causes and consequences of disruptions in freight transport operations. Such a measure is needed to quantify the scale of impact and identify the root causes of disruptions.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to develop this measure, an inductive approach was adopted, using four primary case studies to test the measure in an industrial environment. The case studies are from the fast moving consumer goods sector with primary and secondary distribution networks included. The “Extra Distance” measure has been evaluated against established generic criteria that define the quality of any performance measure.

Findings

The research indicates good compliance with the criteria used to evaluate the “Extra Distance” measure. The measure is also found to be useful for practitioners who are able to directly relate the measure to their distribution network operations.

Research limitations/implications

Further research should see the “Extra Distance” measure further tested in other freight transport operations and industrial sectors.

Practical implications

The measure is directly related to a number of causes of uncertainty which helps freight transport managers to quickly identify potential solutions. The “Extra Distance” measure can be used to quantify the effects of disruptions which can occur in road freight transport networks generate unnecessary cost within distribution networks, potentially eroding profit margins which are known to be very low in the road freight transport industry.

Originality/value

This paper presents a novel approach to the assessment of the impact caused by uncertainty within freight transport operations.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 63 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Yingli Wang, Vasco Sanchez Rodrigues and Leighton Evans

The purpose of this paper is to investigate empirically how information and communication technologies (ICT) can contribute to reduction of CO2 emissions in road freight…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate empirically how information and communication technologies (ICT) can contribute to reduction of CO2 emissions in road freight transport and to identify opportunities for further improvements.

Design/methodology/approach

This research adopts a multiple case study approach with three leading UK grocery retailers as exemplars of fast-moving consumer goods retailers, conducted using multiple data collection techniques including interviews, system demonstrations, onsite observations and the use of archive information.

Findings

ICT solutions have a direct positive impact on CO2 emissions reduction but opportunities to further reduce CO2 emissions are perceived as lying beyond retailers’ own distribution networks. These opportunities are not fully utilised due to the complexities of collaborative ICT provisions and retailers’ reluctance to share information with competitors.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the study is that it is exploratory and only three cases were examined. Even though these three retailers represent over 60 per cent of the UK grocery retail sector, other retailers may deploy significantly different ICT applications.

Practical implications

The research provides an overarching insight for businesses on how to leverage the existing and emerging information technologies for environmental and economic benefits.

Originality/value

While sustainability issues have received increasing attention recently, the role of ICT in freight transport for CO2 emissions reduction has not been investigated in depth and its impact is largely unknown. This research advances understanding about how ICT contributes CO2 emissions reductions and provides a framework for further investigation.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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