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Working with Older People, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Vanessa Burholt, Clare Wenger, Anne Scott, Bashar Yahya and Sibani Roy

The Bangladeshi Migrants Pilot Study establishes the feasibility of applying the methods used in studying the informal support networks of older people in the majority…

Abstract

The Bangladeshi Migrants Pilot Study establishes the feasibility of applying the methods used in studying the informal support networks of older people in the majority population of Britain, specifically the Wenger support networks typology, to the elders of an immigrant group, and to elders who have remained in the region of origin. The sample consists of Bangladeshis aged 55+ in Tower Hamlets, London, United Kingdom (N=98), and Sylhet in Bangladesh (N=51) (see Table 1). The paper provides an ethnohistory of Bangladeshi immigration to the United Kingdom, a comparison of the support networks of Bangladeshis living in Sylhet and Tower Hamlets, and a comparison of support networks of Bangladeshis with rural and urban dwellers in the United Kingdom. The Practitioners Assessment of Network Typology (PANT) algorithm produces support network types in 99% of cases and demonstrates that the instrument is applicable in different cultures. Results show little difference between the support networks of Bangladeshis in Sylhet compared with London. There are significant differences between support networks of the Bangladeshi samples and the rural and urban United Kingdom samples.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article

Gillian Windle, Rhiannon Edwards and Vanessa Burholt

Researchers have a wide range of tools for health assessments to choose from, some of which can be lengthy and time consuming. The purpose of this paper is to examine a…

Abstract

Researchers have a wide range of tools for health assessments to choose from, some of which can be lengthy and time consuming. The purpose of this paper is to examine a potentially shorter alternative, the EQ‐5D instrument, with a community dwelling population sample of older people. Data was obtained using trained interviewers from a randomly sampled crosssectional survey of community dwelling older people. 423 people aged 70‐99 were interviewed. Information was obtained relating to activities of daily living, the EQ‐5D, the EQ‐VAS, the SF‐36, use of health and social care services and the presence or absence of a limiting illness, disability or infirmity. In terms of construct validity, the EQ‐5D was able to distinguish between hypoThesised differences in the sample that could be expected to reflect differences in health‐related quality of life. The EQ‐5D items correlated well with conceptually similar items. Completion rates for the EQ‐5D items were good, ranging from 98.3‐98.8%. Completion rates for the EQ‐VAS were 98.1%. The results suggest that the EQ‐ 5D may provide a valid measure of health‐related quality of life in a cross‐sectional population sample of older adults, although the emphasis of the scale is very much on physical health and functioning. The results for the depression/anxiety item suggest that additional information may be needed if mental health is of concern.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Gill Windle and Vanessa Burholt

Older people are reported to be the largest group to suffer from mobility deprivation. This paper reviews the literature relating to the mobility of older people in the…

Abstract

Older people are reported to be the largest group to suffer from mobility deprivation. This paper reviews the literature relating to the mobility of older people in the context of transport opportunities and provision. The findings show that older people regard car ownership as an aid to independence and mobility. Car ownership is considered the norm and a necessity in rural areas. However within Wales, older people are more likely to be on a low income and live in a rural area, and are less likely to have a car than the rest of the population. Mobility, hearing and visual problems have a higher prevalence in the older population, rendering the use of public transport problematic. Difficulties include problems with getting on and off buses, difficulties with reading passenger information, missing information and communicating with service personnel. Improved access to public transport for older and disabled people can make a major contribution to the financial and social independence of this large and growing sector of the population (TRL Project Report, 1994) and will further promote the social inclusion of older people into society.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article

Laura Ferguson

This paper aims to give an overview of the issue of loneliness, an update of issues heard of from across the country, as well as some positive stories and projects being…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to give an overview of the issue of loneliness, an update of issues heard of from across the country, as well as some positive stories and projects being delivered to alleviate loneliness in older age.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes the current research into loneliness in older age, including related health issues and anecdotal evidence from local groups linking reductions in services with increased levels of loneliness in older age.

Findings

Loneliness is a highly subjective emotion that is difficult and complex to measure. However, research has shown that men and women are affected differently. It has been shown to have strong links to health issues such as depression, Alzheimer's and heart disease as well as having been shown to be a bigger risk factor in early mortality than lifelong smoking and obesity.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the first steps being taken by organisations working, under the umbrella of a recently launched Campaign to End Loneliness, towards further reducing loneliness in older age.

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Working with Older People, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Abstract

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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