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Article
Publication date: 30 December 2019

Quynh-Trang Nguyen, Ming-Yen Lee and Yi-Chung Hu

This study aims to concentrate on a specific perspective that has mostly been ignored: employees in social enterprises (SEs). It proposes that employees in SEs should be…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to concentrate on a specific perspective that has mostly been ignored: employees in social enterprises (SEs). It proposes that employees in SEs should be treated with equal importance to outside beneficiaries within the SEs’ value-creating mission.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study approach is adopted, and semi-structured interviews are the primary means of data collection.

Findings

The results show that while economic values are fundamental for the employment relationship, social values play the leading role in employees’ motivation; thus, they can significantly affect the organization’s operation and development.

Research limitations/implications

This work contributes to Maslow’s need theory and psychological contract theory regarding their application to SEs. Practical lessons and suggestions are also provided for SEs’ development.

Originality/value

By emphasizing the value-creating mission of SEs with the new perspective of including employees in it, this work provides empirical evidence and practical lessons for SEs, especially Asian SEs, in terms of management and strategy.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Erika Miyuri Duncan-Horner, Megan Anne Farrelly and Briony C. Rogers

Social entrepreneurship (SE) is an emerging social phenomenon gaining tangible traction for its ability to tackle complex social and environmental problems against a…

Abstract

Purpose

Social entrepreneurship (SE) is an emerging social phenomenon gaining tangible traction for its ability to tackle complex social and environmental problems against a backdrop of global sustainability challenges. This paper aims to unpack SE intentions, mindset and motivations to elucidate “why” and “how” social entrepreneurs (SE) initiate, perpetuate and sustain pro-social entrepreneurship activity. It specifically asks why SE do what they do, how they develop and sustain pro-social entrepreneurship action and how these normative drivers affect the social change process.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative research adopts an exploratory multiple case design approach in examining the tacit experience of eight SE tackling complex water, sanitation and environmental challenges in Indonesia, and combines this with scholarly insights from multiple bodies of knowledge. Case studies include six SE recognised by the Ashoka Foundation and two lesser-known “social enterprises” to enable finding patterns across the cases and compare key differences between pro-social and conventional entrepreneurship. Triangulating semi-structured interviews with secondary data analysis and semi-ethnographic fieldwork observations, this paper provides a rich theoretical and empirical basis to understand the emerging transformative potential of SE in tackling a range of sustainability issues.

Findings

Interviews with eight SE highlighted their intentions to advance inter and intra-generational equity, social justice and sustainability, bringing socially embedded empathetic values and a growth mindset to overcome challenges associated with disrupting existing social order. Direct engagement with the SE revealed 10 critical enabling factors to foster future SE potential, namely, individual background and experience, unmet social needs, empathy, sense of belonging, willingness/passion to alleviate other’s suffering, growth mindset, internal/external catalysts, intrinsic and extrinsic needs, beliefs and goals and declaration of a social mission to ensure consistency in behaviour and action. This demonstrates that while SE are motivated by a variety of self and other-oriented mechanisms, it is ultimately the process of developing empathy, a growth mindset and declaring a social mission that drives and sustains pro-social entrepreneurship action.

Practical implications

The output of this research is a new intentions model, which outlines the 5 phases of enterprise development and 10 critical enabling factors to foster future SE potential. These insights are critical to leveraging the emerging transformative potential of SE in tackling the world’s most urgent sustainability issues.

Social implications

The paper presents a deep analysis of data on individual background, experience and characteristics in developing a new SE intentions model.

Originality/value

The distinct focus on inputs over processes and outcomes answers to a highly elusive topic while offering an alternative approach to understand how SE create remarkably different strategies, processes and outcomes to conventional developmental approaches.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2018

Bernadette Best, Sandra Moffett, Claire Hannibal and Rodney McAdam

The purpose of this paper is to explain how value is co-created in a many-to-many (MTM) context. The authors use a case study of a non-governmental service delivery…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain how value is co-created in a many-to-many (MTM) context. The authors use a case study of a non-governmental service delivery consortium engaging multiple actors to examine how value is co-created beyond the buyer-supplier dyad.

Design/methodology/approach

An explanatory case study of a consortium of seven UK non-governmental organisations (NGOs) delivering public service contracts is presented. Multiple data collection methods are combined; semi-structured interviews (n=30) and focus groups with internal stakeholders (n=5), participant observations (n=4) and document analysis.

Findings

The authors use three illustrative empirical examples to show how different sources, types, enablers and mechanisms of VCC are evident during service provision activities. The findings show how different service provision activities utilise different dimensions, leading the authors to suggest that dimensions of VCC may be context dependent.

Research limitations/implications

As consortia differ in their context and function, the findings may not be generalisable. Nevertheless, they provide specific examples of sources, types, enablers and mechanisms of value co-creation (VCC) that may be applicable to private, public and NGOs.

Practical implications

Understanding how value is co-created with multiple stakeholders can offer competitive advantages likely to lead to improved sustainability, impact and performance.

Originality/value

The empirical study offers a reconceptualisation of VCC in a MTM context. The paper combines disparate perspectives of VCC to offer a more holistic perspective.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2009

Julie M. Bjorkman

In the past decade internal communication began to take on a new identity as it supports the many change efforts underway in organizations today. Change communication …

Abstract

In the past decade internal communication began to take on a new identity as it supports the many change efforts underway in organizations today. Change communication – how internal messaging effects individual behavior change – is a key element for an organization undergoing transformation. Although research points to the need to communicate during change, very little information is available on what the outcomes are of an internal communication strategy that can positively influence individual behavior change during transformation. This chapter enhances current knowledge on this topic by investigating the relationship of awareness and understanding of change messages to individual behavior change through the case study examination of the intentional organizational transformation experienced in a large, consumer packaged goods (CPG) company.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-547-1

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Roland Nuñez

As higher education institutions see the increased enrollment of online students, the services they provide must adapt to meet their needs. This chapter presents an…

Abstract

As higher education institutions see the increased enrollment of online students, the services they provide must adapt to meet their needs. This chapter presents an in-depth case study of the steps that one private American university took, following Kezar’s model (2005), to improve online student engagement. The first phase involved buy-in from leadership and creating a valid justification for the collaboration efforts. The second phase involved taking the first steps to create a culture of collaboration across the institution. The third phase involved the development of programs that continued collaboration efforts through various campuses and departments to create tangible products promoting student success. The institution focused more on the process of collaboration than the results in an effort to create a foundation that could outlast staff changes and restructuring of departments. Early results indicate a potential for other universities to examine their processes used for collaboration between colleges and departments.

Details

International Perspectives on Supporting and Engaging Online Learners
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-485-1

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Andrew Leigh

The purpose of this paper is to examine what is meant by integrity and attempts to translate the concept into specific behaviors that can be taught and learned.

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1947

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine what is meant by integrity and attempts to translate the concept into specific behaviors that can be taught and learned.

Design/methodology/approach

Highlights the topicality of integrity and shows why it is likely to become increasingly important in organizations.

Findings

Presents four basic leadership‐integrity behaviors – moral purpose, lawful and ethical, consistency and standing for something. Highlights the importance of discerning what is right and wrong, acting on what one has discerned, even at personal cost, and saying openly that one is acting on what one understands to be right or wrong.

Practical implications

Advances commercial arguments for developers to espouse and promote integrity and the importance of learning about it in their organizations. Shows that integrity underpins an organization's ultimate profitability and competitiveness, as well as increasing employees' pride, engagement with their jobs and customer loyalty. Claims that integrity has also been revealed to enhance company brand or reputation, improve efficiency, attract staff, conserve and sustain resources and mitigate business risk.

Originality/value

Emphasizes that, in communicating the need to focus on integrity and offering ways to help leaders to develop their performance in this area, it makes sense to focus on what is productive for both the individual and the organization.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Case study
Publication date: 2 January 2020

Fadwa Chaker and Mohamed Wail Aaminou

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Abstract

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Learning outcomes

Discover first-hand entrepreneurship facets in Africa through a real-lived story; and identify key success factors for entrepreneurship in emerging countries.

Case overview/synopsis

The case describes the main entrepreneurial milestones of a young Moroccan entrepreneur. By telling his success stories and his failures, the challenges he stumbled over and how he quickly got on his feet after each fall. The case ends with a description of the creation process and evolution of MyAppConverter®, a highly innovative startup, describes the huge potential of the firm and the main difficulties faced by the founders. With limited financial resources, the associates need to quickly detect the misfunctioning part of the business model and get it fixed before the crucial pitch they are making at the end of the month before world leading investors.

Complexity academic level

Bachelor in business administration.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2015

Chris Fawson, Randy Simmons and Ryan Yonk

We explore the current landscape of business ethics and entrepreneurship within the undergraduate business school curricula and programmatic structure. We then present a…

Abstract

We explore the current landscape of business ethics and entrepreneurship within the undergraduate business school curricula and programmatic structure. We then present a couple of approaches we have used to advance the understanding and teaching of business ethics and entrepreneurship as a set of foundational principles.

As contextual framing for our analysis we convened eight colloquia/workshops over the past three years that bring a wide-ranging group of business school faculty, scholars in complementary disciplines, and business practitioners into a small-group setting to have in-depth conversations about the role of business ethics and entrepreneurship within the business school. Data used in our analysis catalog the ways and the degree to which AACSB-accredited business schools focus their undergraduate curricula and degree program structure on ethics and entrepreneurship. Working through publically available data, primarily from business school websites, we use content analysis as a framework for statistical analysis of the alignment between how a business school articulates strategic focus (mission, vision, and purpose statements) and how it structures its curricular offerings and degree programs. Most business schools continue to operationalize their approach to business ethics and entrepreneurship as programmatic appendages rather than a foundational set of knowledge and skills that are central to the school’s teaching mission. In general, business schools are missing an opportunity to teach practical business ethics and principled entrepreneurship as the central driving force in value-creating activities within all organizations.

Details

The Challenges of Ethics and Entrepreneurship in the Global Environment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-950-9

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2018

Xiaoye Chen, Rong Huang, Zhiyong Yang and Laurette Dube

This paper aims to investigate the impact of different types of corporate social responsibility (CSR; i.e. value-creating CSR, promotional CSR and philanthropic CSR) on…

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2888

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the impact of different types of corporate social responsibility (CSR; i.e. value-creating CSR, promotional CSR and philanthropic CSR) on consumer responses and the moderating role of corporate competence.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested the hypotheses by using two empirical studies – a survey and an experimental study. The evidence is generated based on generalized linear model repeated-measures ANOVAs for the survey study and two-way factorial ANOVAs for the experimental study.

Findings

The findings show that in general, consumers respond to value-creating CSR more favorably than to philanthropic CSR or promotional CSR. In addition, corporate competence moderates consumers’ responses to different types of CSR in such a way that promotional CSR is more likely to have the desired effects when carried out by low-competency rather than by high-competency firms, whereas value-creating CSR is more effective for high-competency firms than for low-competency ones. Philanthropic CSR works equally in both types of firms.

Research limitations/implications

This research answers a long-term call to study the differential consumer effects of various CSR types. It also identifies perceived corporate competence, an important consumer-based corporate factor, as a potential moderator of consumers’ response to CSR types.

Practical implications

Armed with the findings, companies can choose CSR practices that fit with their company characteristics. This research offers important and specific managerial implications to firms with different company profiles on their CSR choices.

Originality/value

Given that today’s managers are faced with the challenge of selecting desirable CSR activities from a group of options, the authors answered the call by studying the differential effects of a wide array of CSR choices and provide important practical guidance to managers. For the first time in the literature, the study also investigates the potential interactive effects between specific CSR types and corporate competence on consumer reactions. This inquiry bears significant relevance to the ongoing discussions concerning whether and how company characteristics generate influences on the outcomes of CSR strategies.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Bo Enquist, Mikael Johnson and Carolina Camén

What is contractual governance in a scenario of performance management? When approached from a static viewpoint, contracting is largely connected with the securing of…

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1394

Abstract

What is contractual governance in a scenario of performance management? When approached from a static viewpoint, contracting is largely connected with the securing of resources, thus acquiring a capacity focus. In this article, we focus on contractual governance as a part of performance management for a stakeholder network in a specific, government‐controlled context: Public Transport. In order to contribute to more dynamic and sustainable public service, a more process‐oriented approach to contractual governance is necessary. Public Transportation in Sweden has undergone an initial wave of development, the production paradigm, and is now undergoing what is more a second wave of service, the service paradigm. A third wave of development is approaching: sustainability. We argue that contractual governance creates a more dynamic contractual relationship as a key element of performance management leading to more sustainable public service. We also argue that a proactive approach during the mission will positively affect all the stakeholders involved.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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