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1 – 10 of over 270000
Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Ivana Silic, Zelimir Dulcic and Meri Visic

The youth (especially students) with their values have major influence on further value system of society in general in the future. Exploring the values and value systems

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Abstract

Purpose

The youth (especially students) with their values have major influence on further value system of society in general in the future. Exploring the values and value systems focused on youth, students in the field of economic science are in the interest of this study. Pedagogical interest for the research of values among youth can be double‐natured: the authors want to find out how much students manage to adapt to validity system of a certain society, or they want to find out what values in which youth can bring to future generation as a special group of people. The aim of this research is to find out whether there are differences in the hierarchical values and the value system between the Economics university students from EFST (Croatia) and GUF (Germany) or not.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to find out if there are values in general and also a value system of the youth, the research was conducted using questionnaires at Universities in Split and Frankfurt. The questionnaire was constructed based on psychometric Likert‐analytical methods. The collected statistical data are entered and stored in the file of the statistical package SPSS.

Findings

The value system of the youth is an important indicator for a specific trend of the society, because young people represent the future backbone of the society. The current situation in society affects the formation of confounding value attitudes to a greater or lesser impact on the actual behavior of young people. Based on obtained results it can be concluded that the Economics students of the University of Split and Frankfurt have a statistically significant difference in the assignment of significance values and the value system as a whole.

Originality/value

This study primarily examines the value systems of students who live in very different social environment. Social environment has affected their value system.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1995

Rainer Feurer and Kazem Chaharbaghi

The increasing level of competition has had a major influence onthe value system which defines the characteristics of an organizationand its relation to internal and…

832

Abstract

The increasing level of competition has had a major influence on the value system which defines the characteristics of an organization and its relation to internal and external environments. The value system is central to the reward structure and therefore determines the organization′s goals which in turn form the basis of strategy formulation. While the increasing level of competition has satisfied a growing level of expectations there has also been a number of negative repercussions which have arisen due to the conflicting nature of value systems on which organizations operate. The solution to this disequilibrium lies in the question of whether endless progress is desirable or a more balanced approach between progress and conservation is necessary. Describes the value system on which organizations operate, then examines the way in which an appropriate balance may be achieved between progress and conservation, together with its implications on strategy formulation.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 33 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 April 2022

Ambara Purusottama, Togar Mangihut Simatupang and Yos Sunitiyoso

A blockchain (BC) is a breakthrough technological invention that comprises entirely different mental models than conventional technology. This fundamental difference can…

Abstract

Purpose

A blockchain (BC) is a breakthrough technological invention that comprises entirely different mental models than conventional technology. This fundamental difference can potentially change the systems of many organizations since the current systems are built upon a centralized paradigm. The adoption of BC brings various benefits to an organization which can initiate changes to a business model (BM). However, the contribution of BC for business model innovation (BMI) is challenging to identify. Therefore, this study aims to understand and describe the adoption of BC for developing BMI.

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents a model that describes the adoption of BC for developing BMI. To justify the model, this study used an empirical approach based on multiple case study through a rigorous process. The case study selection process referred to the products or services that adopt BC to deliver to their customers and monetize their businesses, which resulted in six cases in different areas. Meanwhile, the data collection applied semi-structured interviews and adequate secondary data. The data/information was analyzed using a value proposition, creation, and capture framework.

Findings

The findings identify the adoption of BC in BMIs generated through value creation as a new technological sub-element. This technological adoption evidently affects value proposition and value capture in a different mode. Furthermore, through the model, this study classifies the adoption of BC in BMI based on two dimensions: (1) the level of complexity of BC adoption and (2) the intensity of BMI. The findings show that the cases in this study are dispersed among all quadrants of the conceptual model.

Originality/value

This study can serve as an antecedent for stakeholders in the innovation of BC-based BMs and their implementation patterns. Simultaneously, this study sheds light on the body of knowledge about BC adoption for developing BMI through a validated model from selected cases and technical experts. This study also describes the BC-based activity systems that provide the contributions and benefits from the technology.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Antonio Casanueva-Fernández and José Alberto Ross-Hernández

Senior managers seek to align managerial endeavors with the organization’s objectives. Traditionally, alignment has focused on monitoring and rewarding the achievement of…

Abstract

Senior managers seek to align managerial endeavors with the organization’s objectives. Traditionally, alignment has focused on monitoring and rewarding the achievement of assigned targets. However, there is evidence to suggest that organizations may also seek to align managerial “values” with those of the organization. These attempts to influence managerial mindsets through management control systems raise non-trivial questions regarding the systems involved, the reasons behind them, and the possible consequences of such attempts. These questions form the basis of this research, and this chapter reports on two case studies of Mexican organizations that claim to have a values-based philosophy. This study contributes to the management literature by presenting empirical evidence related to certain philosophical ideas on the development of human potential and senior managers’ attempts to influence their employees’ will. In detailing the implementation process of two specific value systems, this chapter fills a gap identified in the management control literature.

Details

Strategy, Power and CSR: Practices and Challenges in Organizational Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-973-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2003

Michael W Preis, Salvatore F Divita and Amy K Smith

Missing in most of the research on selling has been an examination of the process from the point of view of the customer. When satisfaction in selling has been considered…

Abstract

Missing in most of the research on selling has been an examination of the process from the point of view of the customer. When satisfaction in selling has been considered, researchers have focused on the satisfaction of the salesperson with his job and/or the impact of this job satisfaction on performance (e.g. Bluen, Barling & Burns, 1990; Churchill, Ford & Walker, 1979; Pruden & Peterson, 1971). To concentrate on salesperson performance while neglecting customers is to ignore the most important half of the relationship between buyers and sellers and entirely disregards the marketing concept and the streams of research in customer satisfaction. This research takes a different approach and examines customers’ satisfaction with salespeople.

Details

Evaluating Marketing Actions and Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-046-3

Article
Publication date: 24 December 2021

Xiaosong Dong, Wenli Cao and Yeqing Bao

This paper provides the strategic direction and coordination mechanism selection for the intelligent transformation of manufacturing enterprises.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides the strategic direction and coordination mechanism selection for the intelligent transformation of manufacturing enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical framework is developed through grounded theory and case analysis.

Findings

Collaboration value is the building block of the intelligent product ecosystem. The ecosystem is upgraded via a path of product coordination, platform coordination and network coordination.

Practical implications

This paper provides a framework for enterprises to build an intelligent product ecosystem.

Originality/value

The proposed intelligent product ecosystem framework is new to the literature and lays down a fruitful avenue for future research.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

David Marginson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role played by value systems as mechanisms for organizational change. Three issues are examined: purpose; implementation;…

2292

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role played by value systems as mechanisms for organizational change. Three issues are examined: purpose; implementation; and effects, intended and unintended, that may arise from using values systems as a management control mechanism to effect organizational change.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on evidenced garnered from an in‐depth, longitudinal study of a major UK based organization which operates in the “global communications industry”. Data are collected from a range of sources, but particularly interviews and a questionnaire survey involving a broad cross‐section of the company's managers.

Findings

Findings suggest that, in terms of purpose, top management may use value systems as a management control mechanism to effect organizational change by espousing a new set of normative values which should inform managers' decisions and actions, particularly in trade‐off situations. Communication and implementation of value systems may involve a multitude of formal and informal information‐based mechanisms and procedures, including mission statements, newsletters, email, “strategy days”, “roadshows” and similar social events. Implementation may rely on change agents creating a drive for change. However, the results of a questionnaire survey suggest that value systems may be only partly successful in securing their intended purpose of mobilising attitudes around a particular set of normative values. Various unintended effects may arise which, in the present case, include increasing project redundancy, decreasing project scrutiny, a re‐distribution of social esteem within the firm, polarisation of attitudes towards budgetary control, and a general reduction in the exercise of hierarchical management control. Overall, it argued that the use of value systems as a mechanism of organizational change may be as problematic to the firm as it is beneficial.

Practical implications

The results of the present study may help firms devise more appropriate value systems for “maintaining or altering patterns of organizational behaviour”.

Originality/value

The present study contributes further insight is through evidence which suggests value systems may be used to communicate a set of quite specific values; and adds to a knowledge of the range of procedures which may be involved in using value systems to effect organizational change.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Uta Jüttner and Hans Peter Wehrli

Recent discussion about relationship marketing as a new marketingconcept is strongly connected with a novel perspective on exchangeprocesses as the core of marketing…

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Abstract

Recent discussion about relationship marketing as a new marketing concept is strongly connected with a novel perspective on exchange processes as the core of marketing. Suggestions for changes in terminology – from transactions to relationships – and the enriched understanding provide the basis for developing marketing strategies. Analyses the understanding of transactions and relationships in the context of the conceptual exchange framework developed by Bagozzi in 1975. The reflection helps to locate the distinctive foci of actual relationship marketing proponents. Further illustrates the, until now, neglected research direction of marketing relationships in complex systems or networks. As a first step to closing this gap, and to develop further the scope of relationship marketing, outlines the role of marketing in the creation and design of “value systems”.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Igor Linkov, Savina Carluccio, Oliver Pritchard, Áine Ní Bhreasail, Stephanie Galaitsi, Joseph Sarkis and Jeffrey M. Keisler

Value chain analyses that help businesses build competitive advantage must include considerations of unpredictable shocks and stressors that can create costly business…

1719

Abstract

Purpose

Value chain analyses that help businesses build competitive advantage must include considerations of unpredictable shocks and stressors that can create costly business disruptions. Enriching value chain analysis with considerations of system resilience, meaning the ability to recover and adapt after adverse events, can reduce the imposed costs of such disruptions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a perspective on resilience as both an expansion and complement of risk analysis. It examines applications of both concepts within current value chain literature and within supply chain literature that may inform potential directions or pitfalls for future value chain investigations. Established frameworks from the broader field of resilience research are proposed for value chain resilience analysis and practice.

Findings

The synthesis reveals a need to expand value chain resilience analysis to incorporate phases of system disruption. Current explorations in the literature lack an explicit acknowledgement and understanding of system-level effects related to interconnectedness. The quantification methods proposed for value chain resilience analysis address these gaps.

Originality/value

Using broader resilience conceptualizations, this paper introduces the resilience matrix and three-tiered resilience assessment that can be applied within value chain analyses to better safeguard long-term business feasibility despite a context of increasing threats.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 43 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Jon‐Arild Johannessen and Johan Olaisen

To discuss systemic thinking in relation to the naturalistic position in the philosophy of social science. To develop the theme in two parts: Part I: systemic thinking and…

Abstract

Purpose

To discuss systemic thinking in relation to the naturalistic position in the philosophy of social science. To develop the theme in two parts: Part I: systemic thinking and the naturalistic position; and Part II: the systemic position.

Design/methodology/approach

A cybernetic approach is taken, and a discussion on what is the foundation for the philosophy of social science for systemic thinking and the systemic position is developed.

Findings

The findings of Part I have been given. Part II analyses the systemic position and considers the classical controversy in social science between methodological individualism and methodological collectivism (holism). The pre‐condition on which the systemic position is based is given. The ideal requirements set up by the systemic position are presented under the headings: espistemology/methodology; ontology; axiology; and the ethical position.

Practical implications

Provided assistance to social scientists who study social systems from the systemic or cybernetic viewpoint and give a practical analysis of the systemic position. Provides researchers and others working in this field with an investigation of the role and conduct of social scientists.

Originality/value

It positioned systemic thinking in relation to the philosophy of social science.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 34 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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