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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/01425459210012680. When citing…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/01425459210012680. When citing the article, please cite: Marilyn J. Davidson, Valerie J. Sutherland, (1992), “Stress and Construction Site Managers: Issues for Europe 1992”, Employee Relations, Vol. 14 Iss: 2, pp. 25 - 38.

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European Business Review, vol. 92 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Valerie J. Sutherland

Results of a stress audit conducted among personnel working in theoffshore oil and gas industry indicated that sources of stress varied asa function of employment…

Abstract

Results of a stress audit conducted among personnel working in the offshore oil and gas industry indicated that sources of stress varied as a function of employment, including the type of installation, the rig size and location, and the actual status of the employee. Suggests that the introduction of a global stress management strategy is not the most effective way of dealing with work‐related stress; a programme which seeks to eliminate sources of stress through change to the organization is required, in addition to stress management training, which helps the individual cope with the pressures of a job which can be changed or eliminated.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Cary L. Cooper and Valerie J. Sutherland

Research on nearly 120 chief executive officers(CEOs) and their spouses from among The Times1000 European companies is explored. Theresearch found that many CEOs are…

Abstract

Research on nearly 120 chief executive officers (CEOs) and their spouses from among The Times 1000 European companies is explored. The research found that many CEOs are showing increasing signs of stress, and that the main difficulties are associated with the job interfering with family and private life due to enhanced workloads, work‐related travelling, weekend working, etc. Suggestions are made about what organisations can do to help.

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Employee Relations, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Cary L. Cooper and Valerie J. Sutherland

Research on nearly 120 chief executive officers (CEOs) and theirspouses from among The Times 1,000 European companies isexplored. The research found that many CEOs are…

Abstract

Research on nearly 120 chief executive officers (CEOs) and their spouses from among The Times 1,000 European companies is explored. The research found that many CEOs are showing increasing signs of stress, and that the main difficulties are associated with the job interfering with family and private life due to enhanced workloads, work‐related travelling, weekend working, etc. Suggestions are made about what organizations can do to help.

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Management Decision, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Marilyn J. Davidson and Valerie J. Sutherland

Reports research by interview and questionnaire survey designed toidentify major sources of stress among site managers, to examine theirphysical and psychological…

Abstract

Reports research by interview and questionnaire survey designed to identify major sources of stress among site managers, to examine their physical and psychological well‐being, and to identify high risk groups and predictors of stressor outcomes. A high level of anxiety was found, independent of grade; this was predicted by role insecurity, work overload and other extrinsic factors (particularly travel). Identifies lack of management training in this industry as contributing to these stresses. Recommends stress audits and stress management workshops.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Jennifer R. Bradley and Valerie Sutherland

The introduction of stress management programmes into an organization ispotentially complex, and requires careful planning which takes intoaccount possible barriers to…

Abstract

The introduction of stress management programmes into an organization is potentially complex, and requires careful planning which takes into account possible barriers to dealing with stress. The importance of employee attitudes are discussed, based on the results of a questionnaire survey of 231 employees of a social services department. The importance of identifying the various needs of individual employees and different occupational groups, in addition to the needs of the organization is discussed in the context of designing effective stress management programmes.

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Employee Councelling Today, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1995

Valerie Sutherland, Peter Makin, Kevin Bright and Charles Cox

Goal setting and feedback techniques have previously been used toimprove safety behaviour. Describes a pilot study of the application ofa behaviour‐based quality…

Abstract

Goal setting and feedback techniques have previously been used to improve safety behaviour. Describes a pilot study of the application of a behaviour‐based quality improvement process in a continuous process production plant with a particular focus on certain aspects of the organizational structure and climate which might be conducive to the changes necessary to facilitate this approach. Since “quality improvement”, unlike “safety improvement”, is more likely to be contingent on interactions with other people, the need to optimize communication and interpersonal relationships at work are important. Suggests that an internal customer, linking‐pin model provides the optimal conditions required, and ensures a high level of employee participation in the process of continuous quality improvement.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Valerie J. Sutherland

The impact of a major organizational change on generalpractitioners in the UK was assessed using a postal questionnaire duringJuly‐August 1990. The results were compared…

Abstract

The impact of a major organizational change on general practitioners in the UK was assessed using a postal questionnaire during July‐August 1990. The results were compared with those obtained in a previous survey in November 1987. A total of 917 (61 per cent response rate) general practitioners completed the questionnaire measuring aspects of the job causing stress, job satisfaction and mental wellbeing. Compared with 1987, doctors in 1990 experienced significantly decreased levels of job satisfaction and reported levels of somatic anxiety and depression were higher. The stress associated with the demands of the job and patients′ expectations, practice administration and routine medical work, role stress and the use of social support as a coping strategy were the strongest predictors of job dissatisfaction and poor psychological wellbeing.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

Peter J. Makin and Valerie J. Sutherland

An important distinction in psychology is between external and internaldeterminants of behaviour. Behaviour may be perceived as beingdetermined either by factors internal…

Abstract

An important distinction in psychology is between external and internal determinants of behaviour. Behaviour may be perceived as being determined either by factors internal to the individual (e.g. personality) or by external factors, in particular the consequences that follow the behaviour. External factors are central to the behavioural approach. The tendency for people to underestimate the importance of external factors in influencing behaviour is discussed. An application of the behavioural approach to accident reduction is described and the benefits and problems associated with its implementation discussed. The importance of workforce participation and involvement are emphasized. In addition, it is suggested that the commitment of management, especially at the highest levels, is required if the programme is to maintain long‐term effectiveness.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1995

Valerie J. Sutherland and Cary L. Cooper

In the last ten years there has been some focus of attention on thepressures faced by chief executive officers and the consequences offailure to survive in a hard‐driving…

Abstract

In the last ten years there has been some focus of attention on the pressures faced by chief executive officers and the consequences of failure to survive in a hard‐driving and highly competitive business world and international climate. Presents the results of a survey of 118 chief executives from The Times top 100 European companies and 93 of their partners, in order to understand more about their lifestyle and the stressors faced by this élite group. Comparisons are made with responses to a ten‐country survey concluded in 1984, in addition to comparisons made between chief executives based in Great Britain, “other” EEC countries and those working in Scandinavia. The results indicated that 25 per cent of chief executives believed that they were at risk from job burnout and this perception was strongest in Great Britain and among those aged 50 or less. Levels of anxiety and depression also tended to be higher for this younger group of chief executives. It is clear that these individuals are beginning to question the notion of “success at any cost” and acknowledge that quality of life must be an important consideration in their lifestyle.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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