Search results

1 – 10 of 216
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Valerie Johnson, Sonia Ranade and David Thomas

This paper aims to focus on a highly significant yet under-recognised concern: the huge growth in the volume of digital archival information and the implications of this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on a highly significant yet under-recognised concern: the huge growth in the volume of digital archival information and the implications of this shift for information professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

Though data loss and format obsolescence are often considered to be the major threats to digital records, the problem of scale remains under-acknowledged. This paper discusses this issue, and the challenges it brings using a case study of a set of Second World War service records.

Findings

TNA’s research has shown that it is possible to digitise large volumes of records to replace paper originals using rigorous procedures. Consequent benefits included being able to link across large data sets so that further records could be released.

Practical implications

The authors will discuss whether the technical capability, plus space and cost savings will result in increased pressure to retain, and what this means in creating a feedback-loop of volume.

Social implications

The work also has implications in terms of new definitions of the “original” archival record. There has been much debate on challenges to the definition of the archival record in the shift from paper to born-digital. The authors will discuss where this leaves the digitised “original” record.

Originality/value

Large volumes of digitised and born-digital records are starting to arrive in records and archive stores, and the implications for retention are far wider than simply digital preservation. By sharing novel research into the practical implications of large-scale data retention, this paper showcases potential issues and some approaches to their management.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1981

Paul Sykes, Gordon Johnson, Alan Samways, Valerie Belsey, Alan Duckworth and George McMurdo

AT FIRST glance the leading article in NLW for June, entitled ‘Reform again’, suggested a stirring of the loins of that dormant beast local government reorganisation and…

Abstract

AT FIRST glance the leading article in NLW for June, entitled ‘Reform again’, suggested a stirring of the loins of that dormant beast local government reorganisation and not—as it turned out—the structure of the Library Association. Of the former some might exclaim, ‘Not that again!’ in the belief that the 1974 upheaval is too fresh and painful in the memory for objective consideration. But, for a number of reasons, a re‐appraisal of the situation is timely. First, although the polemics of victors may fashion a version of history for a few years, unsound principles do not remain dominant forever. Secondly, a number of district councils are renewing their efforts to reclaim some services, including libraries, lost to the English counties in 1974. And, even if they fail, it is probable that when there is a new government in a year or so (of whatever hue) the botched job emanating from the 1972 Local Government Act will be tidied up. Then, at the very least, the politicians will see to it that there is a major revision of boundaries, if only to recognise the existence of modern communications and living styles, both of which have a marked effect on that which politicians hold most dear— voting patterns. Therefore, in the profound hope that local government lunacy cannot continously triumph over commonsense, it can be assumed that at the next re‐organisation the nature of local government functions and their distribution will not be regarded as favours to be horse traded in the same way that some senior posts were allocated in 1974. (‘Our borough engineer for your librarian and public health inspector’…remember?)

Details

New Library World, vol. 82 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Abstract

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 55 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 20 December 2000

Abstract

Details

Sociology of Crime, Law and Deviance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-889-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Annie Cossins

One of the key contributions of feminist criminology has been to recognise the cultural significance of the concepts of sex and gender, bodies and social practices in…

Abstract

One of the key contributions of feminist criminology has been to recognise the cultural significance of the concepts of sex and gender, bodies and social practices in order to conceptualise men’s engagement with crime, including the dominance of men as perpetrators of crimes of violence against women.

This chapter focusses on the #MeToo movement which has revealed the stark contrast between women’s experiences of sexual assault and sexual harassment, and the extent of men’s perceived entitlement to women’s bodies. By theorising the regulatory processes by which different bodies are ‘moralised’, it is possible to see how cultures are created by reference to the values ascribed to different bodies as well as what different bodies do. The author considers the applicability of moral regulation theory to show how processes of sexualisation, including sexual assault and harassment, constitute identity formation and considers whether resistance in the form of the #MeToo movement amounts to a powerful enough challenge to introduce cultural and structural changes.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Feminism, Criminology and Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-956-4

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Julie McLeod

Abstract

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Yang-Ming Chang, Thomas R. Sadler and Shane Sanders

Abstract

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 42 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-726-1

1 – 10 of 216