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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Valerie Ford Jacob, Daniel J. Bursky, Stuart H. Gelfond, Michael A. Levitt, Paul D. Tropp and Vasiliki B. Tsaganos

The purpose of this paper is to describe recent amendments to Rule 144 of the Securities Act of 1933 concerning holding periods and resale of privately placed securities.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe recent amendments to Rule 144 of the Securities Act of 1933 concerning holding periods and resale of privately placed securities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes key changes with respect to shortened holding periods, elimination of most requirements for non‐affiliates, and relaxation of requirements for sale of debt securities.

Findings

The paper finds that the SEC has adopted significant amendments to Rule 144 that will increase the liquidity of privately placed securities and ease the burden on issuers caused by having to grant burdensome registration rights. The amendments shorten the holding periods before affiliates and non‐affiliates may sell restricted securities and otherwise loosen restrictions on the public resale of equity and debt securities acquired in private placements.

Originality/value

The paper is a useful guide to rule changes written by experienced securities lawyers.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 December 2004

Abstract

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-139-2

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Naresh K. Malhotra

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Hannelore B. Rader

The following is an annotated list of materials dealing with information literacy including instruction in the use of information resources, research, and computer skills…

Abstract

The following is an annotated list of materials dealing with information literacy including instruction in the use of information resources, research, and computer skills related to retrieving, using, and evaluating information. This review, the twentieth to be published in Reference Services Review, includes items in English published in 1993. A few are not annotated because the compiler could not obtain copies of them for this review.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1965

IN 1946 there was in the British Isles a clear image of librarianship in most librarians' minds. The image depended on a librarian's professional environment which was of…

Abstract

IN 1946 there was in the British Isles a clear image of librarianship in most librarians' minds. The image depended on a librarian's professional environment which was of the widest possible range, not less in variation than the organisations, institutes or types of community which required library services. Generalisations are like cocoanuts but they provide for the quickest precipitation of variant definitions, after the stones have been thrown at them. A generalisation might claim that, in 1946, public librarians had in mind an image of a librarian as organiser plus technical specialist or literary critic or book selector; that university and institute librarians projected themselves as scholars of any subject with a special environmental responsibility; that librarians in industry regarded themselves as something less than but as supplementing the capacity of a subject specialist (normally a scientist). Other minor separable categories existed with as many shades of meaning between the three generalised definitions, while librarians of national libraries were too few to be subject to easy generalisation.

Details

New Library World, vol. 67 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Deborah J. Morris, Shubhinder Shergill and Elizabeth Beber

People with an intellectual disability (ID) are more at risk of experiencing adverse childhood events. Moreover, prolonged exposure to ACEs results in enduring changes and…

Abstract

Purpose

People with an intellectual disability (ID) are more at risk of experiencing adverse childhood events. Moreover, prolonged exposure to ACEs results in enduring changes and impairments in neurological, physiological and psycho-social systems and functioning. In response, van der Kolk et al. (2009) have put forward the concept of developmental trauma disorder (DTD) to reflect the “constellation of enduring symptoms” and complex care needs of this population. The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the level of exposure to adverse childhood events and the prevalence of DTD in an inpatient forensic ID population.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective file review and consensus approach to diagnosis were used in a sample of adults with an ID detained in a secure forensic service.

Findings

Results revealed that 89 admissions (N=123) had been exposed to at least one significant ACE, with 81 being exposed to prolonged ACEs. A total of 58 admissions (47 per cent) met criteria for PTSD and 80 (65 per cent) met the criteria for DTD. Significant gender differences were noted in MHA status, primary psychiatric diagnoses, exposure to ACEs and DTD.

Research limitations/implications

The discussion explores the implications for working with forensic ID populations who report high incidents of childhood trauma and the utility, strengths and weaknesses of the proposed DTD, its relationship to ID diagnoses is explored.

Originality/value

The study outlines the prevalence of DTD and PTSD in ID forensic populations and suggests additional key assessment and treatment needs for this population.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

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