Search results

1 – 10 of 182
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Heather Short and Valerie Anne Anderson

The purpose of this study is to explore the implications of national and international standards for human resource development (HRD) practice. It focuses on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the implications of national and international standards for human resource development (HRD) practice. It focuses on the experiences, perceptions and learning of those involved in the social construction of standards and standardisation processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is grounded in institutional and organisational excellence theories and adopts a qualitative approach based in social constructivism. Thematic analysis of the data obtained from 13 semi-structured interviews leads to a discussion of awareness of standards, standards adoption including constraints, and impact of standards.

Findings

The findings indicate that that there has been a disconnect between the potential impact of British Standards Institute (BSI) HR standards and what has occurred in practice with little awareness of the BSI standards among practitioners.

Research limitations/implications

This paper identifies an absence of institutional isomorphism in the HR arena and highlights the potential for a “standards-practice” gap where HR standards formation processes are perceived as detracting from flexibility and innovativeness in organisational practice.

Originality/value

This study contributes a new perspective of the implications of HR standards formation from the perspective of those involved and further contributes to the wider theorisation of standards in the HRD field.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Valerie Anderson, Grahame Boocock and Stuart Graham

This paper is concerned with the learning needs of managers in SMEs that seek to become progressively international. A particular focus of attention is the informal…

Downloads
1348

Abstract

This paper is concerned with the learning needs of managers in SMEs that seek to become progressively international. A particular focus of attention is the informal learning practices that occur within the economic and social networks utilised by managers in this sector. Using both qualitative and quantitative approaches to data collection, the paper investigates the challenges perceived by managers engaged (or seeking to engage) in international activity. The results suggest three main areas of challenge: first, the early “pre‐internationalisation” stage, when decisions about “whether”, “where” or “how” to internationalise are taken; secondly, the development of longer‐term planning processes and business systems to cope with the consequences of the initial internationalisation decision; thirdly, the challenge of regulatory issues and the need to secure payment and manage foreign intermediaries. Further areas of learning need, which depend on the significance of international business for the firm, are also indicated. Existing structures, cultures and approaches to management can be maintained for many SMEs that undertake some limited international activity. Where international business is a more important factor, however, managers need to develop cultural appreciation and empathy to underpin their expertise and consolidate their market position. Indeed, sustained international development may require a significant reorienting of the business, underpinned by management and organisational learning to develop an appropriate international “mind‐set” that supports the effective development of relationships with stakeholders in different countries.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 October 2014

Cynthia D. Anderson, Christine Mattley, Valerie Martin Conley and David A. Koonce

Community colleges are an under-recognized but vital component of higher education. Public two-year colleges provide a foundation for baccalaureate degree attainment…

Abstract

Purpose

Community colleges are an under-recognized but vital component of higher education. Public two-year colleges provide a foundation for baccalaureate degree attainment, educate a skilled math and science workforce, and support local economic development. Our research, which examines women STEM faculty at community colleges, highlights the role of gender in reproducing advantages and disadvantages within the academy.

Methodology

Data were collected by face-to-face interviews with 27 women faculty at nine community colleges in Ohio. We utilized semi-structured interviewing techniques to examine key dimensions such as decision-making leading to employment in two-year institutions, perceived advantages and disadvantages of such work, job satisfaction, and challenges to balancing career and family.

Findings

Results indicate considerable satisfaction among women faculty members, but contradict a popular stereotype that work at community colleges is easier for women with families. Despite relative parity in terms of occupational composition, pay, and tenure, community colleges are gendered in that they lack formal programs, institutionalized support, and leadership opportunities to support women.

Research limitations

Adjunct faculty play an important role in higher education but are underrepresented in our sample. Future research is needed to examine the unique situation of part-time faculty.

Implications

Community colleges are uniquely poised to contribute to improving gender equality for women in STEM. Understanding community colleges and the academic careers of women in STEM employed by these institutions is a vital step in our nation’s efforts to develop systemic approaches to increase representation and advancement of women in STEM careers.

Details

Gender Transformation in the Academy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-070-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Valerie Anderson

This paper aims to outline important lessons for HR professionals who seek to ensure that investment in learning delivers strategic value to the organization.

Downloads
579

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline important lessons for HR professionals who seek to ensure that investment in learning delivers strategic value to the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Making use of data from semi‐structured interviews, the paper explores the extent to which perceptions of the strategic value of learning held by senior HR professionals are aligned with those of senior operational managers.

Findings

The data indicate what executives expect learning to deliver at an organizational level, the challenges of aligning learning to strategic priorities and the ways in which HR professionals are measuring and reporting on the value of learning. A trend away from “return on investment” approaches to “return on expectation” assessments of the value of learning is identified.

Research limitations/implications

In addition to the views of senior managers, further research into the value expectations of line managers and other stakeholder groups is now required.

Practical implications

The article highlights the importance of identifying and communicating the alignment of learning strategy with organizational priorities, the need for proactive dialogue between HR professionals and senior decision makers to develop management trust in the learning value contribution and the development of a balanced range of value measures and assessments that are significant for the organization in its specific context.

Originality/value

Traditional measures of training effectiveness have focused on the functional interests of learners and trainers. This research shifts attention to expectations at a strategic level and the consequences of this for measuring and reporting on the value of learning.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Valerie R. Anderson, Teresa C. Kulig and Christopher J. Sullivan

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to examine the ways in which human trafficking has been measured through the use of agency record data.Approach – The authors…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to examine the ways in which human trafficking has been measured through the use of agency record data.

Approach – The authors review the state of previous research on human trafficking using agency record data and the challenges that are important to consider when using agency records in the study of human trafficking.

Findings – Researchers have used agency records in a wide variety of ways to measure human trafficking victimization, perpetration, and patterns or case characteristics. Agency data provide unique contributions to understand human trafficking including the scope of the problem, predictors of victimization, and public perceptions of this crime. The authors describe the efforts to use agency records to estimate the prevalence of human trafficking in a statewide study.

Value – This chapter provides an overview of how agency records have been used in human trafficking research in recent years. Furthermore, this chapter includes a case study and methodological reflection on the use of agency records in a statewide human trafficking prevalence study. The authors conclude with a methodological reflection and considerations moving forward for future use of agency data in human trafficking research.

Details

Methods of Criminology and Criminal Justice Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-865-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Valerie Anderson and Sarah Gilmore

This paper aims to explore the introduction of a new experience‐based learning process in the learning and teaching of human resource development (HRD) within a…

Downloads
1852

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the introduction of a new experience‐based learning process in the learning and teaching of human resource development (HRD) within a professionally accredited curriculum in a UK University.

Design/methodology/approach

An action enquiry approach is taken, and qualitative data gathered over a full academic year from tutors and students are analysed to examine how those involved made sense of and learned about HRD.

Findings

Influences on the experience of an innovative HRD pedagogy are identified as: assessment processes and expectations; relationships and behaviours within the learning and teaching process; the experienced emotions of those involved; and the extent to which students feel clarity about what is expected.

Research limitations/implications

The qualitative nature of the data and the focus on one particular UK institutional taught module limits the generalisability; in particular, the experience of full‐time students or those involved in courses that focus exclusively on HRD outside of UK are not incorporated.

Practical implications

Attention to assessment processes is an essential pre‐requisite to any pedagogic innovation, as is effective and transparent team‐working by tutors and careful thought about tutor behaviours in settings where experienced emotions and relationships directly affect the innovative process.

Originality/value

The inherent tension between the constructivist and exploratory HRD curriculum and the requirement for “performative clarity” in HRD pedagogy is explored. Experienced emotions and relationships are shown to mediate a student‐centred and critically reflexive HRD pedagogy, something that is currently insufficiently recognised in much of the literature.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 34 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Valerie Anderson, Stuart Graham and Peter Lawrence

The paper analyses the management development and learning implications for organizations in the early stages of “going international”. From an empirical study of…

Downloads
3586

Abstract

The paper analyses the management development and learning implications for organizations in the early stages of “going international”. From an empirical study of companies which had recently internationalized, it highlights the requirement for different types of learning at different stages of the process. Some of the learning requirements for successful internationalization are of a “programmatic” type but mostly the implications of internationalization are for “tacit” knowledge, requiring reflective, action‐oriented approaches to learning. The requirement for generative, double‐loop learning is shown to be a key feature of the later stages of the internationalization process. A five‐staged model of internationalization is produced which establishes the implications for management learning throughout the process. It provides those involved with businesses which go international an opportunity to analyse the management learning needs of the organization and so to enhance the success of this form of business development.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Abstract

Details

Methods of Criminology and Criminal Justice Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-865-9

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Abstract

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Sara Nolan

Downloads
448

Abstract

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

1 – 10 of 182