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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2019

Maria Teresa Gorgitano and Valeria Sodano

This paper aims to describe and understand the offer of premium private labels (PPLs) in Italy, with a case study on the extra virgin olive oil (EVOO).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe and understand the offer of premium private labels (PPLs) in Italy, with a case study on the extra virgin olive oil (EVOO).

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical study on EVOO in Italy was aimed to investigate the drivers of the offer of PPLs and its effects on assortment policies. The study was carried out in three Italian provinces, using a cross-sectional design with data collected through direct observation. A two-step data analysis was performed. First, descriptive statistics were used to preliminary appraise hypotheses on the rationale underlying the offer of PPL, and then, the drivers of PPL policy were studied using a logistic regression model.

Findings

The estimated model indicates that in the case of EVOO the probability of offering a PPL is higher for stronger with a stronger competitive position (with respect to other stores), and increases with the size of the category assortment (Total Assortment Width) and with the share of the PL products offered by the store (PL Assortment Index). It also increases if the average price (Total Average Price) and the average price of the standard private label (SPL Average Price) improve; by contrast, it decreases if the national brand (NB) share in the assortment (NB Assortment Index) augments.

Research limitations/implications

Overall, the study confirms that the multi-tiered PL strategy is one of the current competitive strategies of top retailers, centred more on a differentiation than on a low cost/price policy. Such a differentiation policy may have various effects in terms of channel structure and social welfare depending on the underlying corporate and consumer goals and beliefs and on the existing institutional framework.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate the PPL market in Italy using original data and taking into account policies actually carried out at the individual store level. A further element of novelty is the attention given to the welfare effects of multi-tier strategies. This paper suggests that these latter may have various effects in terms of channel structure and social welfare depending on the underlying corporate and consumer goals and beliefs and on the existing institutional framework.

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Ilenia Bregoli, Martin Hingley, Giacomo Del Chiappa and Valeria Sodano

The aim of this article is to analyse how wine and tourism operators understand the concept of a wine route, to determine the impact that definition can have on the extent…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article is to analyse how wine and tourism operators understand the concept of a wine route, to determine the impact that definition can have on the extent to which stakeholders working within distinct, but related sectors (namely wine production, tourism, food and hospitality) collaborate with each other and share knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

By adopting the theoretical lens of “boundary objects” (understood as tangible or intangible entities that allow the sharing of meaning to different groups and facilitate collaboration), this article uses a qualitative approach, based on semi-structured interviews of 20 informants working in three different wine routes in Italy. Analysis of data is carried out to highlight the similarities and differences between the wine and tourism (including identified associated service) industries.

Findings

Wine routes can be considered boundary objects that, if clearly defined by local stakeholders, can facilitate knowledge sharing and collaboration. Problems in collaboration could be explained by an initial mis-definition by stakeholders of what a wine route and its remit are.

Research limitations/implications

As the theoretical lens of “boundary objects” was applied for the first time to wine routes and tourism, further research is necessary to validate its application.

Practical implications

It is suggested that managers of wine routes involve all stakeholders in discussions to achieve a common understanding on what a wine route is, and its role in the promotion of “place” (geographical context of the wine route). Only if this is done successfully, is it possible to achieve collaboration.

Originality/value

This article uses the concept of “boundary objects” (a concept traditionally applied to the study of innovation) to the analysis of wine routes and provides further theoretical and managerial insights concerning networking between wine and tourism sectors, taking a supply-side perspective.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2019

Fabio Verneau, Francesco La Barbera, Mario Amato and Valeria Sodano

Palm oil is a versatile ingredient of many food and non-food products. Yet, over the last year it has rapidly become a controversial product due to its alleged harmful…

Abstract

Purpose

Palm oil is a versatile ingredient of many food and non-food products. Yet, over the last year it has rapidly become a controversial product due to its alleged harmful health and environmental effects. Palm oil has rapidly become a controversial product. As a consequence, many food companies have introduced alternative fat sources into their products, in order to meet consumers’ concerns. The purpose of this paper is to: first, investigate consumer purchase intention by assessing whether the environmental, social and health concerns (HCs) act as drivers with regard to the choice of not consuming products containing palm oil; and second, estimate the direct effect of participants’ information seeking (IS) upon their intention, and whether IS mediates the effects of the attitudinal latent constructs on intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative survey of 608 respondents was performed. A structural equation modelling (SEM) procedure was implemented.

Findings

Results show that: first, HC is the main driver of participants’ intention to reduce palm oil consumption; second, consumers’ attitudes towards environment and social fairness exert significant direct effects upon intention; third, IS exerts a direct effect on intention; also, it partially mediates the effects of environmental and social concerns, whereas it totally mediates the HC effect.

Originality/value

This is the first study to address the issue of comparison between different drivers of sustainable consumer intentions using a formal test by SEM. Moreover, findings add insightful discussion points to some important issues concerning the role of consumers in the current food system organisational structure and strategies.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Valeria Sodano, Martin Hingley and Adam Lindgreen

The aim of this paper is to assess the welfare effects of the newest trends in food safety policies characterised by the shift from public to private intervention.

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1945

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to assess the welfare effects of the newest trends in food safety policies characterised by the shift from public to private intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

Food safety policies are analysed through concepts of new economic sociology, with a critical review of the literature on social capital.

Findings

The article shows that as food safety and quality attributes responsible for the exchange complexity are simply codified and enforced through standards and third‐party certification, the global value chain governance shifts from a relational type to a power‐based type, with possible negative welfare effects.

Research limitations/implications

Further research would be required to verify the welfare effects suggested on the theoretical ground.

Practical implications

The article makes a useful updating of food safety policies and organisational innovation in the food system.

Originality/value

The paper introduces some new (with respect to the marketing literature related to the food system) concepts and theories of economic sociology.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Valeria Sodano and Martin Hingley

This theoretical research article aims to take an economics approach to set out the role of the food system and its importance in control of greenhouse gases (GHG) and…

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1857

Abstract

Purpose

This theoretical research article aims to take an economics approach to set out the role of the food system and its importance in control of greenhouse gases (GHG) and contribution to climate change. The article seeks to challenge the weak position of public policy aimed at tackling this major issue and the shortcomings of reliance on food corporations' voluntary and sporadic approach based on corporate social responsibility (CSR).

Design/methodology/approach

A review of literature and analysis of the legal and economic theories of the firm show how both public and private intervention tends to be ineffective in facing the many problems raised by climate change within the food sector. This article proposes a “government case” for CSR.

Findings

It is argued that interventions to tackle climate change are political rather than economic and depend on power relationships among different actors, such as states and large corporations, involved in their implementation. The main conclusion of the article is that a renovated agenda to tackle climate change ought to be based on the two pillars of soft regulation‐voluntary CSR and binding state regulation. In this new scenario corporate and antitrust laws should be used to correct the growing imbalance between corporate rights and corporate responsibility, with binding regulations supporting voluntary CSR.

Originality/value

Application of CSR has been left to corporations which have pursued their own piecemeal agenda; and the predominant creed of neoliberalism has been ineffectual in governance. This article questions its effectiveness and proposes an original and potentially sustainable alternative.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Valeria Sodano, Maria Teresa Gorgitano, Fabio Verneau and Cosimo Damiano Vitale

The purpose of this paper is to investigate attitudes of Italian consumers towards a set of applications of nanotechnology in the food domain. The chief goal is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate attitudes of Italian consumers towards a set of applications of nanotechnology in the food domain. The chief goal is to identify the main factors influencing the willingness to buy nanofoods (WTBN), distinguishing between factors related to the products, in terms of perceived risks and benefits and psychological factors.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was administered to a sample of about 300 people to gather information about the willingness to buy six nanofoods (namely: creamier ice cream with the same fat content; salt and sugar that do not form lumps with moisture; fruit juices enriched with bioactive molecules; bread enriched with Omega-3; plastic bottles for beer; antimicrobial food packaging for meat) and psychological characteristics, measured by several attitudinal scales. In order to study the influence of the attitudinal factors on the WTBN a simultaneous equations model was estimated, defining both its structural and reduced form.

Findings

Respondents show a certain reluctance to buy foods produced using nanotechnologies The estimates of the econometric model indicate that WTBN is affected by the risks and benefits perceived with respect to the six nanofoods under consideration; the level of neophobia, as captured through the food technology neophobia scale; and the level of trust in food industry.

Originality/value

The study extends the literature on nanofood consumer acceptance by adding useful evidence from the Italian case, which has not yet been studied.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2008

Martin Hingley, Valeria Sodano and Adam Lindgreen

The purpose of this article is twofold: first, to review the literature in order to assess the opportunities and the possible welfare effects of differentiation strategies…

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6857

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is twofold: first, to review the literature in order to assess the opportunities and the possible welfare effects of differentiation strategies in the food market; and second, to analyse the current structure and organisation of the fresh produce market (fruit, vegetable, and salad) in the light of new product procurement, innovation, and differentiation policies carried out by retailers at the global level.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used a single dyadic case study across two countries (Italy and the UK): the primary producer is engaged in “partner” supply to a principal category management intermediary for channel leading multiple retailers.

Findings

First, equilibrium in differentiated markets is not stable, and a welfare assessment is difficult. Second, a differentiation strategy in the market for fresh produce might benefit retailers more than in other sectors, which seem to be consistent with the theoretical findings. Third, when retailers engage in product differentiation it is more likely that channel relationships shift from collaborative to competitive types, with the power imbalance becoming the disciplinary means by which vertical coordination is achieved and maintained.

Research limitations/implications

This article was based on a single case study.

Practical implications

For suppliers it could be wise to agree to some inequity as the cost of doing business, especially when smart large retailers carry out successfully competitive strategies with positive spill‐over effects on the upstream firms.

Originality/value

Using the industrial economic literature on the effects of differentiation strategies (horizontal and vertical differentiation) on market structure, firms' performance, and welfare effects, this paper analyses case findings from a study in the fresh produce industry and will be of interest to those within the field.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Charles Dennis, T C Melewar and Chiara Mauri

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416

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Content available

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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