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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Valérie Mathieu

Challenges the traditional perspective of product services in the business marketing literature. An original classification system is proposed that isolates and compares…

Abstract

Challenges the traditional perspective of product services in the business marketing literature. An original classification system is proposed that isolates and compares two types of product services: services that support the supplier’s product (e.g. after‐sale services) and services that support the client’s action in relation to the supplier’s product (e.g. training service). A qualitative study based on this classification is then reported. The study centered on one of the main European manufacturers in the micro‐electronics industry, and involved interviews with customers, distributors, and managers in the manufacturing firm.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Valérie Mathieu

This paper develops a typology of service maneuvers achieved by manufacturing companies. This typology is based on two dimensions: service specificity (split into customer…

Abstract

This paper develops a typology of service maneuvers achieved by manufacturing companies. This typology is based on two dimensions: service specificity (split into customer service, product services and service as a product) and organizational intensity (tactical, strategic or cultural).The paper reviews the benefits and costs associated with service maneuvers and discusses their interplay with the typology. A collaborative option is proposed as an original strategy for supporting the challenging process of implementing a service maneuver, and the costs of running this option are developed in the light of the typology.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Magnus Hellström

– The purpose of the paper is to outline a business model for product system solutions that is based on functional modularity.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to outline a business model for product system solutions that is based on functional modularity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs an illustrative case study design. The cases constitute two action research projects in two organisations delivering complex product systems.

Findings

The paper illustrates the viability of a movement towards a solution business model based on the use of modular networks and integrated sub-supplies for complex product systems. It develops the idea of suppliers assuming responsibility for larger functional wholes in the delivery of large capital goods.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should strive to further validate and falsify the proposed model, and for other product systems too, with a particular focus on their operational phases.

Practical implications

The paper outlines a business model based on modularity for both main suppliers and sub-suppliers that wish to extend their scope of delivery and to share responsibility with their networks.

Originality/value

The proposed model is in considerable contrast to conventional models in which the main supplier typically assumes most of the responsibility itself.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Jorge Flores-Aranda, Mathieu Goyette, Valérie Aubut, Maxime Blanchette and Frédérick Pronovost

The purpose of this paper is to document the experience of current and former methamphetamine users on their crystal meth use patterns and on their use of services related…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document the experience of current and former methamphetamine users on their crystal meth use patterns and on their use of services related to their chemsex practice.

Design/methodology/approach

For qualitative component, two focus groups were formed with nine current users of methamphetamine and eight former users. Thematic analysis was performed to know their experiences.

Findings

All participants were already engaging in chemsex with various substances before they first started using methamphetamine. Methamphetamine use led some to slam (methamphetamine or mephedrone injection). Some participants report that their sexual experiences were intensified early in their chemsex practice. They reported feeling more confident with their partners, feeling like they are sexually attractive and overcoming their barriers to sexuality. The intensification of methamphetamine use and, in particular, injection change the positive perception of sexual life. Thus, for some participants, substance use takes more space and their sexual experiences become less satisfactory.

Practical implications

Participants report the services that address the phenomenon of chemsex are still scarce in Quebec province. In addition, the few services available aim to relearn a sober sexuality. However, the mourning of the positive aspects of chemsex on sexual experiences seems still very little discussed. Greater consideration of positive chemsex experiences is needed in services that address this issue.

Originality/value

This project documented the perception of pleasure related to sexual practices among regular methamphetamine users. Their perception of pleasure will help develop services adapted to their reality.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Valerie I. Sessa, Jessica L. Francavilla, Manuel London and Marlee Wanamaker

Multi-team systems (MTSs) are expected to respond effectively to complex challenges while remaining responsive and adaptable and preserving inter-team linking mechanisms…

Abstract

Purpose

Multi-team systems (MTSs) are expected to respond effectively to complex challenges while remaining responsive and adaptable and preserving inter-team linking mechanisms. The leadership team of an MTS is expected to configure and reconfigure component teams to meet the unique needs of each situation and perform. How do they learn to do this? This paper, using a recent MTS learning theory as a basis, aims to begin to understand how MTSs learn and stimulate ideas for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use two case studies to address research questions. The first case was a snapshot in time, while the second case occurred over several months. Interviews, documents and participant observation were the data sources.

Findings

As suggested by theory, findings support the idea that learning triggers, the timing of the triggers and readiness to learn (RtL) affect the type of learning process that emerges. The cases showed examples of adaptive and generative team learning. Strong and clear triggers, occurring during performance episodes, led to adaptive learning. When RtL was high and triggers occurred during hiatus periods, the associated learning process was generative.

Originality/value

Using an available theoretical model and case studies, the research describes how MTS readiness to learn and triggers for learning affect MTS learning processes and how learning outcomes became codified in the knowledge base or structure of the MTS. This provides a framework for subsequent qualitative and quantitative research.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Abstract

Details

Methods of Criminology and Criminal Justice Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-865-9

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Ashwin J. Baliga, Vaibhav Chawla, Vijaya Sunder M. and Rajesh Kumar

To address service failure issues, scholars have recognized several service recovery (SR) mechanisms. However, there exist many barriers that retard an effective SR…

Abstract

Purpose

To address service failure issues, scholars have recognized several service recovery (SR) mechanisms. However, there exist many barriers that retard an effective SR process, and those often lead to negative consequences. Although this is a generic problem applicable across markets, it becomes critical in B2B markets, as they deal with high impact and corporate customers. The purpose of this paper is to identify these SR barriers in B2B markets and explore their linkages toward identifying the key driving barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

A four-phased methodology to address this call in the IT services industry was used. First, the identification phase led to the selection of 27 barriers based on literature. Second, in the prioritization phase, 12 salient barriers were prioritized with the help of an expert panel. Third, in the modelling phase, the total interpretive structural modelling (TISM) technique was used to examine the mutual influences among these barriers toward modelling their linkages using a digraph. Finally, in the classification phase, these barriers were graphically plotted and classified into four quadrants based on their dependence and driving powers by using Matriced Impacts Croisés Multiplication Appliquée á un Classement (MICMAC) analysis.

Findings

Two strategic barriers, namely, technology obsolescence and poor top management commitment, presented the strongest challenges against effective SR, as they were least dependent on other barriers and exerted strong influence over the operational barriers to executing SR.

Practical implications

Because the strategic level barriers, exerting strong influence against effective SR, arise from the strategic choices of board and the C-suite, this paper helps them anticipate the recovery-related after effects of their choices, thus helping them in making better decisions.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to research as it is first of its kind to explore and link SR barriers in B2B markets.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Valerie I. Sessa, Manuel London and Marlee Wanamaker

Extending a model of how teams learn, this paper aims to present a model of multiteam system (MTS) learning, comparing similarities and differences between how MTSs learn…

Abstract

Purpose

Extending a model of how teams learn, this paper aims to present a model of multiteam system (MTS) learning, comparing similarities and differences between how MTSs learn and how component teams learn. The paper describes the value of adaptive, generative and transformative learning for increasing MTS development over time.

Design/methodology/approach

The model proposes that environmental demands trigger adaptive, generative and transformative MTS learning, which is further increased by the MTS’s readiness to learn. Learning can happen during performance episodes and during hiatus periods between performance episodes.

Findings

Learning triggers coupled with readiness to learn and the cycle and phase of MTS process influence the learning process (adaptive, generative or transformative), which in turn influences the learning outcomes.

Research/limitations implications

The study offers a number of research propositions with the idea that the model and propositions will stimulate research in this area.

Practical implications

This model allows MTS and component team leaders and facilitators to recognize that MTS learning is a process that is needed to help component teams work together and help the MTS as a whole perform in current and future situations, thereby improving MTS effectiveness.

Originality/value

Little attention has been given to the notion that MTSs learn and develop. This manuscript is the first to emphasize that MTSs learn and identify processes that can improve learning. Adaptive, generative and transformative processes describe how MTSs learn and produce changes in MTS structure and actions.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2019

Valérie-Inés de La Ville and Nathalie Nicol

The purpose of this paper is to offer some insight into how siblings aged between 4 and 12, engaged in a collaborative drawing activity at home, recall the shopping trips…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer some insight into how siblings aged between 4 and 12, engaged in a collaborative drawing activity at home, recall the shopping trips they have experienced.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a Vygotskian perspective, the data collection consisted of engaging 15 pairs of siblings in the production of a joint drawing of a shop of their choice. Drawing in pairs opens a Zone of Proximal Development (Vygotsky, 1978) where the younger child benefits from verbal guidance by the older one to achieve the common task. This situation enables the researcher to gain close access to children’s knowledge about stores and to the words they use to describe their personal shopping experiences.

Findings

This exploratory research reveals some constitutive elements of children’s “shopscapes” (Nicol, 2014), i.e. the imaginary geographies they actively elaborate through their daily practices and experiences with regard to retail environments. In their communicative interactions when elaborating a joint drawing of the shop they have chosen, children demonstrate that they master a considerable body of knowledge about retail environments. Surprisingly, recalling their shopping practices sheds light on various anxiety-generating dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

The data collection is based on a remembering exercise performed at home and does not bring information about what children actually do in retail environments. Moreover, the children were asked to focus on buying a present for a friend’s birthday, therefore the information gathered essentially relates to toy stores.

Practical implications

This research underlines the necessity for retailers to endeavour to reduce some of the anxious feelings depicted and verbalized by children, by improving the welcome for children into their stores.

Social implications

There are also opportunities for retailers to invest in the consumption education area by guiding young visitors so that they learn how to behave as apprentice consumers in retail outlets.

Originality/value

The child-centric perspective of the study reveals new and surprising insights about the way children report their memorised shopping experiences.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Valerie R. Anderson, Teresa C. Kulig and Christopher J. Sullivan

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to examine the ways in which human trafficking has been measured through the use of agency record data.Approach – The authors…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to examine the ways in which human trafficking has been measured through the use of agency record data.

Approach – The authors review the state of previous research on human trafficking using agency record data and the challenges that are important to consider when using agency records in the study of human trafficking.

Findings – Researchers have used agency records in a wide variety of ways to measure human trafficking victimization, perpetration, and patterns or case characteristics. Agency data provide unique contributions to understand human trafficking including the scope of the problem, predictors of victimization, and public perceptions of this crime. The authors describe the efforts to use agency records to estimate the prevalence of human trafficking in a statewide study.

Value – This chapter provides an overview of how agency records have been used in human trafficking research in recent years. Furthermore, this chapter includes a case study and methodological reflection on the use of agency records in a statewide human trafficking prevalence study. The authors conclude with a methodological reflection and considerations moving forward for future use of agency data in human trafficking research.

Details

Methods of Criminology and Criminal Justice Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-865-9

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