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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Soroosh Saghiri and Vahid Mirzabeiki

This paper aims to explore how omni-channel data flows should be integrated by specifying what data, omni-channel agents and information and digital technologies (IDTs…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how omni-channel data flows should be integrated by specifying what data, omni-channel agents and information and digital technologies (IDTs) should be considered and connected.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study method is used with 17 British companies. The studies are supported by 68 interviews with the case companies and their consumers, 5 site visits, 4 focus group meetings and the companies’ archival data and documentations.

Findings

This paper provides novel frameworks for omni-channel data flow integration from consumer and business perspectives. The frameworks consist of omni-channel agents, their data transactions and their supporting IDTs. Relatedly, this paper formalizes the omni-channel data flow integration in the forms of horizontal, vertical and total integrations and explores their contributions to the adaptability of omni-channel, as a complex adaptive system (CAS). It also discusses that how inter-organizational governance mechanisms can support data flow integration and their relevant IDT implementations.

Research limitations/implications

The breadth and depth of the required IDTs for omni-channel integration prove the necessity for omni-channel systems to move toward total integration. Therefore, supported by CAS and inter-organizational governance theories, this research indicates how data flow integration and IDT can transform the omni-channel through self-organization and autonomy capability enhancement.

Originality/value

This research’s recommended frameworks provide a robust platform to formalize data flow integration as the omni-channel's core driver. Accordingly, it moves the literature from a basic description of “what omni-channel is” and provides a novel and significant debate on what specific data should be shared at what levels between which agents of the omni-channel, and with what type of relationship governance mechanism, to assure omni-channel horizontal, vertical and total integrations.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Vahid Mirzabeiki, Jan Holmström and Kary Främling

The purpose of this paper is to propose a collaborative tracking and tracing (T&T) system that enables supply chain actors to join and leave the system in run-time without…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a collaborative tracking and tracing (T&T) system that enables supply chain actors to join and leave the system in run-time without disrupting the function of the system.

Design/methodology/approach

A collaborative T&T system is introduced using a conceptual approach. Supporting empirical data are collected through a deductive case study of a Swedish automotive supply chain.

Findings

A collaborative T&T system based on composite and observer design patterns is an appropriate solution for inter-organizational T&T.

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes to the body of knowledge in the field of logistics T&T. The conceptually developed collaborative T&T system needs to be validated empirically.

Practical implications

The collaborative T&T system developed conceptually here could be used as a model for the practical development of inter-organizational T&T systems.

Originality/value

The introduction of a collaborative T&T system, adopting the theories of software engineering and product data management, represents an original contribution to the field of T&T in logistics and transportation.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Kenth Lumsden and Vahid Mirzabeiki

The paper aims to define the most beneficial types of information within a supply chain and their level of value for different partners in the supply chain. A secondary…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to define the most beneficial types of information within a supply chain and their level of value for different partners in the supply chain. A secondary objective of this study is to compare the literature focus with the practitioners' perception concerning the value adding information types and their value level in the supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, by reviewing published papers and textbooks on functionality and the value of information in supply chains, the most important types of information beneficial for the different partners of the supply chain depending on their position are identified. The value levels are quantified for the different partners through the supply chain by interviews with practitioners in different segments of the chains. A comparison between values of significant information types in the supply chains, concluded from the literature and the practitioners' interviews, is presented in this paper.

Findings

The study indicates the warehouse operations information as the most valuable information type from the practitioner's perspective. Also the result of this paper indicates increasing value of information further down the supply chain.

Practical implications

The result of this study could be applied for prioritizing the need for different information types in designing a supply chain.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the literature on the value of information and supply chain information by identifying and categorizing different types of information which are made available to create value for different partners in the supply chain. Also, this study identifies the benefit share of different supply chain partners from information. A comparison of the ideas of the literature and practitioner's on value of information is shown in this study.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 38 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Henrik Anders Ringsberg and Vahid Mirzabeiki

The paper aims to explore the potential effects on logistic operations of implementing the Electronic Product Code Information Service (EPCIS) standard and radio frequency…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore the potential effects on logistic operations of implementing the Electronic Product Code Information Service (EPCIS) standard and radio frequency identification (RFID) technology to enable food traceability. A conceptual model for analysing supply chains according to EPCIS standard is also presented.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was conducted to establish a theoretical framework. A case study of a Swedish fresh fish supply chain was then carried out.

Findings

Implementation of the EPCIS standard and RFID technology to enable food traceability potentially affects the following logistic operations activities: identification, monitoring, labelling, goods handling, reporting of production, identification costs and revenue changes due to sales of goods. The conceptual model was used to analyse the effects.

Research limitations/implications

The paper contributes to logistic research by studying the implementation of RFID technology and information standards to comply with food traceability requirements. The research is limited to fish supply chains; other sectors and supply chains need to be investigated for further generalisation of the results.

Practical implications

Regulatory requirements on food traceability stipulate the implementation of food traceability systems, placing the responsibility on companies by authorities. The research presented can support managers in understanding the potential effects of implementing such systems.

Originality/value

The discussion about logistics and food traceability has in part revolved around implementation of RFID technology and standardised approaches for handling information to preserve food quality and safety. This paper presents potential effects on logistic operations when implementing the EPCIS standard and RFID technology as a way of enabling traceability throughout food supply chains.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Nicolas Danloup, Vahid Mirzabeiki, Hamid Allaoui, Gilles Goncalves, Denyse Julien and Carlos Mena

The purpose of this paper is to study the potential for improving sustainability performance in food supply networks by implementing collaborative distribution. Food…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the potential for improving sustainability performance in food supply networks by implementing collaborative distribution. Food supply chains generate a significant portion of CO2 emissions, because of the large volume of food transportation and the large number and frequency of trips made to deliver food products to retail stores, making it available to the customers. Collaboration of partners in food supply chains will lead to reducing CO2 emissions.

Design/methodology/approach

Such collaboration could be in the form of sharing trucks by retailers, to increase the fill rate of the vehicles and to reduce their empty running. A case study of the logistics network of a British company, distributing fruits and vegetables, is carried out. The company sends the products from a distribution centre to 27 retailers’ warehouses of 3 different companies in the UK. A simulation study is carried out to measure the reduced traveled distance for delivery of the products and the reduced amount of CO2 emissions across two different scenarios, as a result of implementing collaborative distribution.

Findings

With this approach, the total CO2 emissions are able to be reduced by at least 26 per cent.

Originality/value

The theoretical contribution of the paper is important both for showing the role of simulation and collaborative distribution for developing the green supply chain solutions management and their indicating to the applications to logistics and product delivery.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 38 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Henrik Anders Ringsberg

Implementing global traceability standards (GTSs) facilitates interoperability in food supply chains (FSCs). The purpose of this paper is to present incentives…

Abstract

Purpose

Implementing global traceability standards (GTSs) facilitates interoperability in food supply chains (FSCs). The purpose of this paper is to present incentives, opportunities and requirements for implementing GTSs in a fresh FSC.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was developed in two stages: a literature review was conducted to establish a theoretical framework; and then an in-depth case study of a Swedish fresh fish supply chain was conducted. The Kano methodology was used to evaluate opportunities based on implementation requirements in each enterprise.

Findings

FSC enterprises implement a GTS to meet legal food traceability requirements. This incentive is stronger among enterprises upstream in the FSC than among downstream enterprises. Downstream enterprises emphasize communication with the end consumer as an incentive to implement a GTS. Implementing a GTS increases the opportunity to preserve end consumer confidence, efficiency in information sharing, reduces time in inventory management and the risk of theft.

Research limitations/implications

The paper contributes to the field of food traceability by providing knowledge regarding incentives, opportunities and requirements for implementing standards to meet food traceability requirements at FSC enterprises.

Practical implications

Regulatory requirements on traceability preservation of food safety, quality and sustainability stipulate the implementation of a GTS. The research presented can support managers in understanding incentives and opportunities for implementing a GTS.

Originality/value

This paper combines in-depth academic research with the involvement of Swedish fresh food enterprises. The study is of benefit to fresh food enterprises, authorities and organizations in the further implementation and development of GTSs.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

David Walters and Stan Glaser

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 38 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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