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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1956

VERNON D. FREEDLAND

Although textiles is one of the oldest crafts and goes back to prehistory—it is believed that weaving grew up in the neolithic or later stone age—our modern civilization…

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Abstract

Although textiles is one of the oldest crafts and goes back to prehistory—it is believed that weaving grew up in the neolithic or later stone age—our modern civilization is producing such rapid and numerous developments in so many aspects of the subject that the individual is hard put to keep up with only a fraction of them.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1954

VERNON D. FREEDLAND

In the course of my daily round as an information officer engaged in sifting out material from the stream of printed matter flowing across my desk, I recently examined the…

Abstract

In the course of my daily round as an information officer engaged in sifting out material from the stream of printed matter flowing across my desk, I recently examined the newly arrived part of a grey‐backed journal devoted to recording development in tinctorial science. Among the pages normally given over to more serious matters, I found a story concerning two Yorkshire manufacturers of thirty years ago who had decided to engage a research chemist. At 9 o'clock on a Monday morning, the chemist arrived at the wonderfully equipped laboratory provided for him at the mill and the two partners sat in their office, hugging themselves with excitement and unable to settle down to their regular duties. At about quarter past eleven, not being able to stand the strain any longer, they tip‐toed up to the new laboratory, put their heads round the door and burst out … ‘Well, lad, hast discovered owt?’

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1955

VERNON D. FREEDLAND

In a previous paper I pointed out how much richer was the Manchester area in research and industrial libraries than was another important region in the North. It is…

Abstract

In a previous paper I pointed out how much richer was the Manchester area in research and industrial libraries than was another important region in the North. It is appropriate on this occasion to enlarge upon that theme and attempt a survey of the several libraries and information departments which have been set up hereabouts by various bodies with the important aim of giving a quick and efficient service to industrial and commercial interests. With such a closely packed conurbation as exists around Manchester, it is difficult to set a precise boundary, but for the purpose of this survey I have elected to consider the area lying within a twenty‐mile radius of the city centre.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1959

VERNON D. FREEDLAND

While larger firms have set up information departments and libraries, or have appointed information officers assigned to the work of collecting and disseminating…

Abstract

While larger firms have set up information departments and libraries, or have appointed information officers assigned to the work of collecting and disseminating information within the concern, the great majority of smaller firms either do not appreciate the value of internally organized supplies of information or feel that they do not possess the resources for taking action. This state of affairs has been underlined in the reports of a number of investigations and surveys made in recent years.

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1952

T.U. MATTHEW

Before attempting to forecast the future trends and possibilities in the provision of information services for industry it is necessary first of all to consider the…

Abstract

Before attempting to forecast the future trends and possibilities in the provision of information services for industry it is necessary first of all to consider the characteristics of present‐day industrial society and, secondly, the information needs of the industrial units upon which our present economy is based.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1956

E.M.R. DITMAS

The last of the London meetings for the winter session 1955–6 was held on 13th April, 1956, when Mr. C. N. Kington, Group Manager, British Iron and Steel Research…

Abstract

The last of the London meetings for the winter session 1955–6 was held on 13th April, 1956, when Mr. C. N. Kington, Group Manager, British Iron and Steel Research Association, and Director of Research, Cutlery Research Council, spoke on the problem of helping small firms to make use of scientific research. Many of the steel‐using firms are too small to have information departments of their own and, moreover, have a strong tradition of craftsmanship which is often slow to appreciate the value of new techniques. Mr. Kington has had first‐hand experience of the special approach that is necessary if these firms are to be kept in touch with scientific progress. His paper is printed in full in this issue, together with an account of questions and answers in the discussion which followed. The Chair was taken by Dr. M. A. Vernon, of the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, a branch of the Government that is particularly interested in this problem.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1949

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing…

Abstract

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing fields but who have a common interest in the means by which information may be collected and disseminated to the greatest advantage. Lists of its members have, therefore, a more than ordinary value since they present, in miniature, a cross‐section of institutions and individuals who share this special interest.

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1955

Sir Raymond Streat, C.B.E., Director of The Cotton Board, Manchester, accompanied by Lady Streat. A Vice‐President: F. C. Francis, M.A., F.S.A., Keeper of the Department…

Abstract

Sir Raymond Streat, C.B.E., Director of The Cotton Board, Manchester, accompanied by Lady Streat. A Vice‐President: F. C. Francis, M.A., F.S.A., Keeper of the Department of Printed Books, British Museum. Honorary Treasurer: J.E.Wright. Honorary Secretary: Mrs. J. Lancaster‐Jones, B.Sc., Science Librarian, British Council. Chairman of Council: Miss Barbara Kyle, Research Worker, Social Sciences Documentation. Director: Leslie Wilson, M.A.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1958

C.W. CLEVERDON

Few people would deny that the purchase and move into Aslib's new headquarters was a matter of very great importance but I believe that the increased grant made to Aslib…

Abstract

Few people would deny that the purchase and move into Aslib's new headquarters was a matter of very great importance but I believe that the increased grant made to Aslib by the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research is of even greater potential importance. During the last five years the grant had been a maximum of £7,000 a year but the new grant, starting in January 1959, would be £12,000 a year, conditional on Aslib raising £15,000, with a further £100 for every extra £100 raised up to a maximum of £18,000.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 10 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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