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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2020

Ambareen Beebeejaun

Value added tax (VAT) is an indirect tax that is payable upon the consumption of goods and services. Recently, the Government of Mauritius has introduced a new set of…

Abstract

Purpose

Value added tax (VAT) is an indirect tax that is payable upon the consumption of goods and services. Recently, the Government of Mauritius has introduced a new set of rules to extend the VAT system to non-resident providers of electronic services to consumers based in Mauritius. The purpose of this research paper is therefore to assess the adequacy and efficiency of the recent VAT amendments in terms of compliance requirements and collection measures and to identify loopholes in the present legal provisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodologies for the research are in essence comprised of the black letter approach which will analyse the legal provisions relating to VAT in Mauritius. A comparative analysis will also be conducted to find out the corresponding legal provisions relating to VAT on digital services in South Africa.

Findings

This research paper has highlighted some recommendations inspired by the laws of South Africa and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development Based Erosion Profiting Shifting action plan which may be of use to Mauritius stakeholders when devising regulations on the imposition of VAT on foreign suppliers of digital services under Section 14B of the VAT Act.

Originality/value

To the author's best knowledge, this research paper is the first study conducted in the field of indirect taxation of foreign suppliers of digital services to residents of Mauritius.

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Tobore Obrozie Okah-Avae and Benjamin Mukoro

The paper aims to consider how a country like Nigeria, with an underdeveloped tax system, can adapt its tax generation mechanisms to meet the challenges of digital

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to consider how a country like Nigeria, with an underdeveloped tax system, can adapt its tax generation mechanisms to meet the challenges of digital commerce in the 21st century.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a doctrinal approach.

Findings

The paper recommends measures that could be adopted to enhance the efficiency of the current tax systems, to allow it to take advantage of opportunities presented by digital transactions.

Originality/value

To the best the authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first of its kind to consider the taxation of digital transactions in the Nigerian context.

Details

Journal of International Trade Law and Policy, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-0024

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Jeremy Lee and Alexey Nikitkov

Consumption taxes are an integral part of government revenue in countries around the world and are often subject to consumer evasion. The rapid rise of electronic commerce…

Abstract

Consumption taxes are an integral part of government revenue in countries around the world and are often subject to consumer evasion. The rapid rise of electronic commerce has exacerbated this problem as cross-border selling over the internet has enabled foreign businesses to sell and avoid collection and remittance of tax on their sales.

In this paper, we search for the solution to this problem through the analysis of three tax collection models: vendor, financial institution, and internet service provider (ISP). In addition, we examine administrative tools that enable more effective collection as well as inducements for taxpayers or collection agents to carry out their responsibility.

We conclude that the ISP collection model is not feasible at this time. On the other hand, we find that the vendor model, when supplemented with appropriate administrative tools and inducements, and the financial institution model, both represent viable options for policymakers to consider.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

R.D. de Swardt and R. Oberholzer

E‐commerce has changed the way in which business is conducted. One instance of this is that it has made the digitisation of products possible. This shift has severe…

Abstract

E‐commerce has changed the way in which business is conducted. One instance of this is that it has made the digitisation of products possible. This shift has severe implications for traditional consumption taxes, which were developed under the premise of a physical presence in a tax jurisdiction. A large number of countries in the world that impose Value‐Added Tax (VAT) on the supply of goods and services, including South Africa, are affected by this shift. The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has suggested a number of principles that should apply to consumption taxes in e‐commerce. These principles are intended to provide fiscal climates in which e‐commerce can flourish and ensure taxation systems that secure individual countries’ tax bases. A comparison between the OECD principles and the rules pertaining to the imposition of VAT in South Africa on the supply of digitised products reveals several discrepancies and uncertainties. A baseline survey among VAT specialists in South Africa, conducted in order to substantiate these findings, confirmed these discrepancies and uncertainties in practice.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1022-2529

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property…

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Facilities, vol. 19 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Property Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property…

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property Management Volumes 8‐17; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐17.

Details

Facilities, vol. 18 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property Management Volumes 8‐17; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐17.

Details

Property Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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