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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

V.H. Mucino, J.E. Smith and K. Sun

In this paper a new method for the hydrodynamic analysis of a sliding cylinder in a lubricated parallel track is presented. The method is an extension of Booker’s…

Abstract

In this paper a new method for the hydrodynamic analysis of a sliding cylinder in a lubricated parallel track is presented. The method is an extension of Booker’s “Mobility Method” (developed for cylindrical journal bearings) for the case of a non‐rotating sliding cylinder in a parallel track. In this application, the clearance between the track and the cylinder, the viscosity of the lubricant, the radius and length of the pin, the sliding velocity and the applied transverse load determine the hydrodynamic behavior of the slider cylinder. An axial positive displacement vane device is used to illustrate the applicability of the hydrodynamic mobility approach for a lubrication analysis. A rotor and a stationary cylindrical cam with cycloidal tracks drive the axicycloidal motion of vanes. A case analysis is presented for a device running at constant speed, in which the inertia forces, friction forces and direct vane loads are taken into account to determine the hydrodynamic behavior of the sliding pins. The following results are produced: pin eccentricity paths, minimum lubricant film thickness history, peak film pressure history and pressure distributions on the cylindrical at any point of the motion. Results show small departures from the purely cycloidal lift‐dwell‐return‐dwell motion of the vanes due to the hydrodynamic performance of the pins.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 52 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

V.H. Mucino, K. Sun and J.E. Smith

The system studied here consists of a non‐rotating cylinder sliding inside a fully lubricated parallel track with a prescribed longitudinal velocity, carrying a transverse…

Abstract

The system studied here consists of a non‐rotating cylinder sliding inside a fully lubricated parallel track with a prescribed longitudinal velocity, carrying a transverse load (normal to the track). Reynolds equations are used for the particular case of a non‐rotating sliding cylinder in a fully lubricated track. Two short‐bearing mobility charts are developed for a normalized clearance track (equivalent to those developed by Booker for journal‐bearings). Pressure distributions around the cylinder and motion paths within the clearance track are produced for prescribed transverse loading and longitudinal speed requirements for hydrodynamic analysis purposes. Numerical application examples are presented for general and specific cases at the end.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

M. Selvaraj, Vela Murali and S.R. Koteswara Rao

The purpose of this paper is to propose a three‐dimensional thermal model for friction stir welding of AISI 1018 mild steel to predict the thermal cycle, temperature…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a three‐dimensional thermal model for friction stir welding of AISI 1018 mild steel to predict the thermal cycle, temperature distribution, the effect of welding parameters on power required, heat generation and peak temperature during the friction stir welding process.

Design/methodology/approach

The mathematical expressions for heat generation during the friction stir welding process were derived. The simulations for various welding and rotational speeds were carried out on ANSYS software employing temperature and radius dependent moving heat source and applying the boundary conditions.

Findings

The predicted thermal cycle, torque required and temperatures were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The heat generation and peak temperatures were found to be directly proportional to rotational speed and inversely proportional to welding speed. The rate of increase in heat generation and peak temperature were found to be higher at lower rotational speeds and lower at higher rotational speeds. The heat generation during friction stir welding was found to be 71.4 per cent at shoulder, 23.1 per cent at pin side and 5.5 per cent at bottom of the pin.

Originality/value

A new temperature dependent slip factor has been used to determine the contribution of slipping and sticking on total heat generation. A temperature and radius dependent moving heat source has been employed.

Details

Multidiscipline Modeling in Materials and Structures, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1573-6105

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

P. Sathiya, N. Siva Shanmugam, T. Ramesh and R. Murugavel

Friction stir welding (FSW), a process that involves joining of metals without fusion of filler materials. It is used already in routine, as well as critical application…

Abstract

Friction stir welding (FSW), a process that involves joining of metals without fusion of filler materials. It is used already in routine, as well as critical application for the joining of structural components made of Aluminum and its alloys. Indeed it has been convincingly demonstrated that the process results in strong and ductile joints, some times in systems, which have proved difficult using conventional welding techniques. The process is most suitable for components that are flat & long (plates & sheets) but it can be adapted for pipes, hollow sections and positional welding. The welds are created by the combined action of frictional heating and mechanical deformation, due to a rotating tool. Recently, a new technology called friction stir spot welding (FSSW) has been developed that has a several advantages over the electric resistance welding process widely used in automotive industry in terms of weld quality and process efficiency. This welding technology involves a process similar to FSW, except that, instead of moving the tool along the weld seam, the tool only indents the parts, which are placed on top of each other. The conditions under which the deposition process in FSSW is successful are not fully understood. However, it is known that only under specific thermo‐mechanical conditions does a weld formation occur. The objective of the present work is to analyze the primary conditions under which the cavity behind the tool is filled. For this, a fully coupled thermo‐mechanical three‐dimensional FE model has been developed in ABAQUS/Explicit using the adaptive meshing scheme and the Johnson‐Cook material law. The contact forces are modeled by Coulomb’s law of friction, making the contact condition highly solution dependent. Temperature graph in the radial direction as well as stress, strain plots are presented.

Details

Multidiscipline Modeling in Materials and Structures, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1573-6105

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2019

Isam Tareq Abdullah and Sabah Khammass Hussein

The purpose of this paper is to join a sheet of the AA7075 with the high-density polyethylene (HDPE) by a lap joint using friction spot processing and investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to join a sheet of the AA7075 with the high-density polyethylene (HDPE) by a lap joint using friction spot processing and investigate the temperature distribution of joint during this process using the finite element method (FEM).

Design/methodology/approach

A semi-conical hole was manufactured in the AA7075 specimen and a lap joint configuration was prepared with the HDPE specimen. A rotating tool was used to generate the required heat to melt the polymer by the friction with the AA7075 specimen. The applied tool force moved the molten polymer through the hole. Four parameters were used: lower diameter of hole, rotating speed, plunging depth and time. The results of shear test were analyzed using the Taguchi method. A FEM was presented to estimate the temperature distribution of joint during the process.

Findings

All specimens failed by shearing the polymer at the lap joint region without dislocation. The specimens of the smallest diameter exhibited the highest shear strength at the lap joint. The maximum ranges of temperature were recorded at the contact region between the rotating tool and the AA7075 specimen. The tool plunging depth recorded the highest effect on the generated heat compared with the rotating speed and plunging time.

Originality/value

For the first time, the AA7075 sheet was joined with the HDPE sheet by friction spot processing. The temperature distribution of this joint was simulated using the FEM.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Jaroslav Mackerle

A bibliographical review of the finite element methods (FEMs) applied for the linear and nonlinear, static and dynamic analyses of basic structural elements from the…

Abstract

A bibliographical review of the finite element methods (FEMs) applied for the linear and nonlinear, static and dynamic analyses of basic structural elements from the theoretical as well as practical points of view is given. The bibliography at the end of the paper contains 1,726 references to papers, conference proceedings and theses/dissertations dealing with the analysis of beams, columns, rods, bars, cables, discs, blades, shafts, membranes, plates and shells that were published in 1996‐1999.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

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