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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

V. Wheatley, H.S. Chiu, P.A. Jacobs, M.N. Macrossan, D.J. Mee and R.G. Morgan

This paper describes a free‐piston driven expansion tube and its instrumentation. The facility is used to generate rarefied flows at speeds of approximately 10 km/s…

Abstract

This paper describes a free‐piston driven expansion tube and its instrumentation. The facility is used to generate rarefied flows at speeds of approximately 10 km/s. Although the flow in the tube itself is in the continuum regime, rarefied flow conditions are achieved by allowing the test gas to further expand as a free jet into the facility's test section. The test flow is surveyed to provide bar‐gauge pressure measurements. Numerical simulation is then used to describe more fully the test flow properties. The flows produced are suitable for the aerodynamic testing of small models at superorbital speeds and should provide data that are suitable for the calibration of Direct Simulation Monte‐Carlo codes.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

A distinction must be drawn between a dismissal on the one hand, and on the other a repudiation of a contract of employment as a result of a breach of a fundamental term…

Abstract

A distinction must be drawn between a dismissal on the one hand, and on the other a repudiation of a contract of employment as a result of a breach of a fundamental term of that contract. When such a repudiation has been accepted by the innocent party then a termination of employment takes place. Such termination does not constitute dismissal (see London v. James Laidlaw & Sons Ltd (1974) IRLR 136 and Gannon v. J. C. Firth (1976) IRLR 415 EAT).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the…

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property…

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Facilities, vol. 19 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Property Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2016

Michael Loadenthal

This paper explores the relationship between social movement protest, economic sabotage, state capitalism, the “Green Scare,” and public forms of political repression…

Abstract

This paper explores the relationship between social movement protest, economic sabotage, state capitalism, the “Green Scare,” and public forms of political repression. Through a quantitative analysis of direct action activism highlighting the Earth Liberation Front and Animal Liberation Front, the discourse surrounding mechanisms of social change and their impact on state power and capitalist accumulation will be examined. The analyses examines the earth and animal liberation movements, utilizing a Marxist-anarchist lens to illustrate how these non-state actors provide powerful critiques of capital and the state. Specifically, the discussion examines how state-sanctioned violence against these movements represents a return to Foucauldian Monarchical power. A quantitative-qualitative history will be used to argue that the movements’ actions fail to qualify as “terrorism,” and to examine the performance of power between the radical left and the state. State repression demonstrates not only the capitalist allegiances between government and industry, but also a sense of capital’s desperation hoping to counter a movement that has produced demonstrable victories by the means of bankrupting and isolating corporations. The government is taking such unconstitutional measures as a “talk back” between the revolutionary potential of these movements’ ideology as well as the challenge they present to state capitalism.

Details

Narratives of Identity in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-078-7

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Carol Byrd‐Bredbenner, Jaclyn Maurer, Virginia Wheatley, Ellen Cottone and Michele Clancy

The purpose of this paper is to observe young adults preparing two recipes in a controlled laboratory setting to identify food‐handling errors. Few studies have…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to observe young adults preparing two recipes in a controlled laboratory setting to identify food‐handling errors. Few studies have investigated actual consumer food safety and food‐handling practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper shows that one of four trained observers used a check‐list to directly observe and record food‐handling practices; observation data were later analyzed to assess how closely participants followed recommended practices. The observation check‐list had four criterion‐referenced scales based on Fight Bac! food safety recommendations (e.g. clean, cook, separate, chill). Each recommended behaviour performed earned one point. Scale scores were calculated by summing points earned and could range from zero to the maximum observed behaviours on the scale. Means, standard deviations, and comparison of mean scores using analysis of variance were calculated.

Findings

Participants (n=154, mean age 20.73+1.30SD) were from a major US university. Overall, participants were observed performing only 50 percent of the recommended behaviours. Scores ranged from a low of 29 percent on the cook scale to a high of 67 percent on the separate scale. Females scored significantly higher on the clean scale (e.g. hands, produce, work surfaces) than males. No other significant gender differences were noted in the scales, despite a trend for higher scores for females in all scales. Young adults, particularly males, engage in unsafe food‐handling practices, putting them at increased risk for food‐borne disease.

Originality/value

The paper shows that innovative education and training opportunities for young adults are needed to assist them in developing and practising safe food‐handling practices.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 109 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Liam Fassam and Samir Dani

Business, consumers and governmental organisations are harbouring a growing need to gain an appreciation of behaviours connected to food criminality. In order to acquire a…

Abstract

Purpose

Business, consumers and governmental organisations are harbouring a growing need to gain an appreciation of behaviours connected to food criminality. In order to acquire a cross-functional understanding of these thematic areas (crime and fraud) the mapping of existing research is needed. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper contributes to the process of knowledge understanding, by systematically reviewing literature to provide an analysis of the current body of business knowledge against the thematic criterion of “supply chain food crime” and “supply chain food fraud”. The analysis derives themes from the literature and maps this across the eight pillars underpinning the UK Government paper on food supply chain resilience.

Findings

A distinct gap lies with the eight pillars of food supply chain resilience, business interest into supply chain criminality and academic research into the field. There are noteworthy gaps when the literature is analysed to that of the UK Government report.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of the study was its focus on business-only journals; a plethora of literature resides in the science field (e.g. testing) that has not made its way to business text.

Practical implications

Drawing inference between business research and the government report, clear identification and tangible research areas can be immediately exploited to align cross-functional thinking.

Social implications

The gap of consumer is not as yet addressed in this field, this research contributes originally to this gap and the need to address the same for societal benefit.

Originality/value

The paper concentrates on the metrics know to contribute to “food crime” and “food fraud” and deviating views of academic vs non-academic literature. In conclusion the paper identifies thematic areas for further research and presents a conceptual framework of food supply chain resilience.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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