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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

V. Orlans

Discusses the need for counselling in the workplace, therecognition of that need, and the requirements for counselling schemes.Considers the definition of counselling…

Abstract

Discusses the need for counselling in the workplace, the recognition of that need, and the requirements for counselling schemes. Considers the definition of counselling, counselling in the work setting, trade unions, and the choice of counselling scheme. Concludes that the success of a counselling scheme depends on the commitment of senior management to the values of counselling, the design of the scheme, and on the counsellors working effectively in the organisational setting.

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Employee Councelling Today, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1992

Sue Wheeler and Dawn Lyon

Reports on the findings of a research study into organizationalresponses to employee stress, funded by the Universities FundingCouncil: 30 interviews, including three…

Abstract

Reports on the findings of a research study into organizational responses to employee stress, funded by the Universities Funding Council: 30 interviews, including three pilot interviews, were conducted with personnel representatives of companies in the West Midlands region in Spring 1991. Stress was understood to be an individual problem by the managers in the sample, rooted in “personality”. In a series of stress‐related case profiles presented to interviewees, problems with physical rather than psychological symptoms were considered to be more deserving of sympathy, assistance, etc. Efforts to deal with stress‐related problems took up considerable employee and management time. Despite goodwill they were not usually informed by knowledge or skill; training was rare. Overall, none of the companies was found to have comprehensive policies or practices to deal with stress. Considers differences in approach through the identification of “styles”.

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Personnel Review, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1986

Vanja Orlans

“Stress” has recently become a very fashionable term, and there is a danger of researchers and practitioners becoming interested in the concept for this reason alone…

Abstract

“Stress” has recently become a very fashionable term, and there is a danger of researchers and practitioners becoming interested in the concept for this reason alone. While the “bandwagon” effect has no doubt contributed to the growing interest in this area, and to the growing number of articles on stress appearing in the popular press, it is worth considering the possibility that this interest masks a cry for help on the part of increasing numbers of individuals and groups. Before exploring the role of the trainer in relation to the management of stress and its prevention, it may be worth considering some of the available research in order to put the problem into perspective.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Vanja Orlans

The focus is on the planning and implementation of stressinterventions within trade union organisations in the UK. Case materialfrom two trade union projects is presented…

Abstract

The focus is on the planning and implementation of stress interventions within trade union organisations in the UK. Case material from two trade union projects is presented, together with an overview of some of the key areas of potential stress in such organisational settings. In addition, an approach to stress diagnosis and management is outlined which does not separate the individual from the organisation in an artificial way. The emphasis is rather on the interactive processes which underpin individual and organisational existence. This theoretical stance has a number of implications for intervention strategies, and these are also outlined. A review of some of the key points which are relevant to the planning of stress interventions in the organisational setting is presented in conclusion.

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Personnel Review, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Michael Carroll

The employee counsellor has one of the most difficult counsellingjobs, and has a thin line to tread between the organization and theindividual. The “organizational”…

Abstract

The employee counsellor has one of the most difficult counselling jobs, and has a thin line to tread between the organization and the individual. The “organizational” counsellor is, in addition, trainer, consultant, organizational agent of change, counselling manager, informant, advocate, advice‐giver and diplomat. Maintaining all these roles with clear demarcation lines, acceptable boundaries, and supportive relationships, calls for maturity and training.

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1986

Vanja Orlans

This article considers the case for providing a counselling service for organisational employees, and reviews the forms that such facilities might take. While counselling…

Abstract

This article considers the case for providing a counselling service for organisational employees, and reviews the forms that such facilities might take. While counselling facilities have been available in the community for a long time (e.g. as “pastoral care”), the provision of these services within organisations is a relatively recent phenomenon.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Christine Blincoe

An article in two parts which considers: the level of counsellingactivity within specific UK organizations: and the functioning of an EAPin one company. Aims, overall, to…

Abstract

An article in two parts which considers: the level of counselling activity within specific UK organizations: and the functioning of an EAP in one company. Aims, overall, to offer some qualitative evidence of counselling services effectiveness. Part 1 used a questionnaire and postal survey to ascertain those organizations providing EAP or counselling services. Considers who performs the counselling service, access to the service, the scope of problems dealt with, and how closely the service matches the essential characteristics of an EAP. Found only one organization that fulfilled all the criteria. Part 2 used structured interviews with employees in one organization. Charts employees′ views on awareness of the EAP, the quality of service being offered, benefits and disadvantages, and involvement of EAP staff in organizational change. Results indicate some lack of awareness of the full role of EAPs; and some stigma associated with using the service. On the whole the EAP is well‐received. Advises against EAP staff becoming involved in organizational change in case the core function of the service is diluted.

Details

Employee Councelling Today, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Marie McHugh

Organizations are being forced to contend with an increasinglydiverse range of influential factors which have implications for theirefficiency and effectiveness. Such…

Abstract

Organizations are being forced to contend with an increasingly diverse range of influential factors which have implications for their efficiency and effectiveness. Such factors are likely to create a cumulative spiral of pressures for organization members and render them susceptible to the adverse effects of stress. Increased prevalence of work stress among employees, coupled with its harmful effects for the operation of companies, prompted an investigation of managerial attitudes to stress at work in the clothing industry. Structured interviews were carried out with managers from 44 companies. Of the respondents 70.5 per cent believed that employees in their company experienced stress at work. Many identified a range of causes and effects, and 81.4 per cent acknowledged that stress is a problem for individuals and organizations. However, few companies had any mechanisms for identifying and helping stressed employees. Highlights a need for companies to take cognizance of the costs of stress within organizations and to take corrective action.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jonathan C. Morris

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within…

Abstract

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and shows that these are in many, differing, areas across management research from: retail finance; precarious jobs and decisions; methodological lessons from feminism; call centre experience and disability discrimination. These and all points east and west are covered and laid out in a simple, abstract style, including, where applicable, references, endnotes and bibliography in an easy‐to‐follow manner. Summarizes each paper and also gives conclusions where needed, in a comfortable modern format.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Léonie Sugarman

Providing counselling in the workplace can challenge the ethicalprinciples on which counselling is based. Identifies a series ofquestions designed to focus attention on…

Abstract

Providing counselling in the workplace can challenge the ethical principles on which counselling is based. Identifies a series of questions designed to focus attention on aims, outcomes, referrals, confidentiality and resources. Concludes that confronting ethical dilemmas is a continuous responsibility for counsellors. Frequently issues are managed rather than resolved. However, in confronting and managing these issues, the values underpinning organizational life can be challenged and, perhaps, changed.

Details

Employee Councelling Today, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

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