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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2020

Emeka Smart Oruh, Chima Mordi, Akeem Ajonbadi, Bashir Mojeed-Sanni, Uzoechi Nwagbara and Mushfiqur Rahman

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between managerialist employment relations and employee turnover intention in Nigeria. The study context is public…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between managerialist employment relations and employee turnover intention in Nigeria. The study context is public hospitals in Nigeria, which have a history of problematic human resource management (HRM) practice, a non-participatory workplace culture, managerialist employment relations and a high employee turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a qualitative, interpretive approach, this paper investigates the process by which Nigerian employment relations practices trigger the employee turnover intention of doctors using 33 semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders in public hospitals.

Findings

This study found that Nigeria’s managerialist employment relations trigger the employee turnover intention of medical doctors. Additionally, it was found that although managerialist employment relations lead to turnover intention, Nigeria’s unique, non-participatory and authoritarian employment relations system exacerbates this situation, forcing doctors to consider leaving their employment.

Research limitations/implications

Studies on the interface between managerialism and employment relations are still under-researched and underdeveloped. This paper also throws more light on issues associated with managerialist employment relations and human resources practice including stress, burnout and dissatisfaction. Their relationship with doctors’ turnover intention has significant implications for employment policies, engagement processes and HRM in general. The possibility of generalising the findings of this study is constrained by the limited sample size and its qualitative orientation.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the dearth of studies emphasising employer–employee relationship quality as a predictor of employee turnover intention and a mediator between managerialist organisational system and turnover intention. The study further contributes to the discourse of employment relations and its concomitant turnover intention from developing countries’ perspective within the medical sector.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Mushfiqur Rahman, Chima Mordi and Uzoechi Nwagbara

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors influencing the implementation of electronic human resource management (e-HRM) in Bangladesh government organisations…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors influencing the implementation of electronic human resource management (e-HRM) in Bangladesh government organisations. Recent research evidence has shown that e-HRM played a significant role in enhancing the performance of human resource (HR) departments in private sector organisations. While similar practices are expected from government domain, there is no empirical research evidence to support this proposition. Given the significant technological advancements today, e-HRM as a strategic tool has grown to encompass seamless functionality to support organisations in providing tactical capability, reducing cost and continuous service improvement as well as the quality of service delivery. Although several private and public sector organisations have implemented e-HRM, its application within government domain in developing regions is limited. This can be attributed to the bureaucratic nature of public sector organisation, which are often slow to adopt changes.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a qualitative and multiple case study research approach.

Findings

The findings provide insights into the myth surrounding the lack of and slow implementation of e-HRM among public sector organisation in developing economies but also serve as empirical data for further research.

Research limitations/implications

The low level in the number of public organisations that have implemented e-HRM applications in developing countries may be responsible for the dearth of empirical studies in this area. The dearth of empirical studies and the need to understand the factors that influence the implementation of e-HRM in public sector organisations led the authors to investigate the factors influencing the implementation of e-HRM in public sector organisation.

Practical implications

Findings from two case organisations exhibit that such an approach contributes towards more healthy and robust decisions for e-HRM implementation and specifies that it is acceptable by the case study organisations. The findings from this research can serve as a source of understanding the particular context in which the study was undertaken. Moreover, it should serve as a catalyst for understanding organisations in similar socio-politico and economic context.

Originality/value

This research advances and contributes to the body of knowledge as it examines factors influencing the implementation of e-HRM in Bangladesh public sector organisations and proposes a model for e-HRM implementation in government organisations in developing economies. The e-HRM implementation research presented in this paper extends recognised standards for e-HRM implementation, by bringing together influential factors – benefits, barriers and risks, thus, enabling government organisations in developing nations to produce more vigorous proposals for e-HRM implementation.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Uzoechi Nwagbara

This study explores the nexus between institutions and managerialist employment relations and subsequent work-life balance (WLB) challenges for Nigerian employees. Through an…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the nexus between institutions and managerialist employment relations and subsequent work-life balance (WLB) challenges for Nigerian employees. Through an exploratory approach, the paper investigates how institutions shape employment relations, which is characterised by systematic and normalised managerialist practices and lack of employee participation.

Design/methodology/approach

Relying on a qualitative, interpretive approach, this study explores the relationship between institutional pressures, managerialism and employment relations. 31 semi-structured interviews and nine focus group interviews data was used.

Findings

This paper found that institutions shape organisational practice, specifically employment relations and human resource management (HRM) practice generally through its normative tendency. The study also found that although managerialist employment relations leads to WLB challenges, Nigeria's unique context aggravates this situation constituting serious WLB challenges for workers.

Research limitations/implications

Researches dealing with the relationship between managerialism, employment relations and WLB are largely underdeveloped and under-theorised. HRM phenomena such as unhappy workforce, stress, lack of flexibility, burnout, turnover and turnover intention, associated with management practice, have major implications for engagement procedures and HRM strategies. However, the sample size used potentially limits generalisation including its qualitative approach.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the dearth of researches focusing on employer–employee relationship quality as a precursor to WLB challenges and a mediator between managerialist employment relations and WLB challenges. Additionally, the study contributes to the burgeoning WLB discourse from developing countries perspective, which is understudied. It also sheds light on how Nigeria's unique context can bring new insights into the nascent WLB discourse and its associated HRM practices.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Mushfiqur Rahman, Erhan Aydin, Mohamed Haffar and Uzoechi Nwagbara

This study aims at demonstrating how social media shape the recruitment and selection processes of individuals in developing countries. It further explores the impacts of social…

4793

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at demonstrating how social media shape the recruitment and selection processes of individuals in developing countries. It further explores the impacts of social media on business productivity, cost efficiency, widening of search, less employee turnover and competitive advantage mediated by adopting e-recruitment processes. This research adopts social network theory to discuss the findings and highlight the new mechanisms that legitimise business manipulation in e-recruitment process by exploring the usage of social media.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary data based on literature review is triangulated with 37 semi-structured qualitative interviews with managerial and non-managerial members of staff.

Findings

The findings show that e-recruitment has immense advantages to businesses. However, the authors also consider the dark side of social media and e-recruitment process by considering social network theory as a manipulation tool in organisations of developing countries.

Originality/value

Having adopted the social network theory, this research highlights the new mechanisms that legitimise business manipulation in e-recruitment process. Thus, it demonstrates technological advancements that reshape the dynamics of social networks and recruitment processes.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 November 2019

Uzoechi Nwagbara and Ataur Belal

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how language (choice) in CSR reports of leading oil companies in Nigeria is used to portray an image of “responsible organisation”.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how language (choice) in CSR reports of leading oil companies in Nigeria is used to portray an image of “responsible organisation”.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws insights from communication studies (persuasion theory) and critical discourse analysis (CDA) studies to discursively unpack all those subtle and visible, yet equally invisible, linguistic strategies (micro-level elements): wording (single words), phrases and chains of words (clauses/sentences). These linguistic strategies (micro-level elements) proxy organisational discourses (meso-level elements), which are reflective of wider social practices (macro-level elements). The authors base the investigation on CSR reports of six leading oil companies in Nigeria from 2009 to 2012.

Findings

The findings of this study reveal that (leading) Nigerian oil companies linguistically use CSR reports to persuasively construct and portray the image of “responsible organisation” in the eyes of wider stakeholders (the communities) despite serious criticism of their corporate (ir) responsibility.

Originality/value

As opposed to the previous content analysis based studies, this paper contributes to the emerging stream of CDA studies on CSR reporting by providing a finer-grained linguistic analytical schema couched in Fairclough’s (2003) approach to CDA (and persuasion theory). This helps to unravel how persuasive language/discourse of responsible organisation is enacted and reproduced. The authors thus respond to the calls for theoretical plurality in CSR reporting research by introducing persuasion theory from communication studies literature which has hitherto been rarely applied.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 November 2020

Uzoechi Nwagbara

The purpose of this study is to examine how institutionalised patriarchy triggers work-life-balance (WLB) challenges for Nigerian female medical doctors. It is focused on Nigeria…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how institutionalised patriarchy triggers work-life-balance (WLB) challenges for Nigerian female medical doctors. It is focused on Nigeria to understand how its unique institutional context poses WLB challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

Relying on exploratory qualitative approach based on 41 semi-structured interviews with female medical doctors in Nigeria and informed by institutional theory (IT), this study explores how patriarchal institutions create, maintain and transmit male dominance, exploitation and inequality in the family, workplace and larger society.

Findings

The findings of this study show that patriarchy exists not only in family but also in all structures and institutions that allow for control of women by men and further inequality and exploitation of women. It was also found that in contrast to research in the west, WLB challenges stemming from Nigeria's patriarchal institutions are significantly different because of the peculiar institutional frameworks framing them. Also, WLB challenges for female physicians while common to female doctors in western countries are more intense in developing countries, given their unique sociocultural and institutional realities.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of this study are that WLB challenges of female doctors are not fundamentally driven by individual choices but by broader contextual issues, which create and sustain such challenges. Further studies can be undertaken in private hospitals including quantitative approaches.

Originality/value

This research thus contributes to both institutional theory and WLB discourse from the perspective of developing countries.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 April 2020

Uzoechi Nwagbara

This paper examines the relationship between the institution’s organizational work-life-balance (WLB) policies and practices and subsequent challenges faced by Nigerian workers…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the relationship between the institution’s organizational work-life-balance (WLB) policies and practices and subsequent challenges faced by Nigerian workers. The paper argues that institutions shape WLB practices (and policies), and thus, constitute WLB challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

Relying on qualitative, interpretive approach, and the institution-based view of organizational practice, the study investigates the relationship between institutions, WLB practices/policies, and subsequent challenges that female workers undergo, using 25 semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The findings reveal Nigeria’s unique institutional context frames and foster challenges for female workers. Also, it was identified that institutional and sociocultural pressures on female employees demonstrate that consequent challenges, while common to female workers in other countries, are more intense and challenging in Nigeria because of its peculiar institutions and context.

Research limitations/implications

This study offers an opportunity to unpick how institutions are important in understanding organizational practices as part of wider social structures, which influence organizational realities, including WLB. The qualitative, exploratory approach undertaken can limit generalizing the findings.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the emerging concept of WLB discourse from the developing countries’ perspective. It also reveals how WLB discourse differs from nonwestern context and emphasizes previously identified challenges that female workers experience based on WLB practice. The study also sheds light on how institutions shape organizational practice.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2018

Rahman Mushfiqur, Chima Mordi, Emeka Smart Oruh, Uzoechi Nwagbara, Tonbara Mordi and Itari Mabel Turner

The purpose of this paper is to examine the implications of work-life-balance (WLB) challenges for Nigerian female medical doctors. This study focusses on Nigeria, which its…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the implications of work-life-balance (WLB) challenges for Nigerian female medical doctors. This study focusses on Nigeria, which its peculiar socio-cultural, institutional and professional realities constitute WLB as well as social sustainability (SS) challenge for female medical doctors.

Design/methodology/approach

Relying on qualitative, interpretivist approach and informed by institutional theory, this study explores how Nigeria’s institutional environment and workplace realities engender WLB challenges, which consequently impact SS for female doctors. In total, 43 semi-structured interviews and focus group session involving eight participants were utilised for empirical analysis.

Findings

The study reveals that factors such as work pressure, cultural expectations, unsupportive relationships, challenging work environment, gender role challenges, lack of voice/participation, and high stress level moderate the ability of female medical doctors to manage WLB and SS. It also identifies that socio-cultural and institutional demands on women show that these challenges, while common to female physicians in other countries, are different and more intense in Nigeria because of their unique professional, socio-cultural and institutional frameworks.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of the WLB and SS requires scholarship to deepen as well as extend knowledge on contextual disparities in understanding these concepts from developing countries perspective, which is understudied.

Originality/value

This study offers fresh insights into the WLB and SS concepts from the non-western context, such as Nigeria, highlighting the previously understudied challenges of WLB and SS and their implications for female doctors.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 April 2020

Tony Wall

387

Abstract

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

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