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1 – 10 of over 122000
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1977

K. Wilson‐Davis

The Centre for Research on User Studies is in its simplest terms a group of people charged with the responsibility of becoming the UK national centre of expertise on user

Abstract

The Centre for Research on User Studies is in its simplest terms a group of people charged with the responsibility of becoming the UK national centre of expertise on user studies, a centre with the four principal and interconnected roles of research, education, advice, consultancy and information. What these imply will be made clearer in due course. First I will try to give the background to the creation of the Centre which will I hope simultaneously answer the query: ‘Why set up a user studies centre?’

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Virginia Minogue, Jean Boness, Ann Brown and John Girdlestone

There are many examples of consumer involvement in NHS research but few studies have examined the impact of this on service development or the research process. This…

4686

Abstract

Purpose

There are many examples of consumer involvement in NHS research but few studies have examined the impact of this on service development or the research process. This study, involving service user and carer researchers working alongside professional researchers, aimed to examine the development of one service user and carer research group in a mental health Trust.

Dersign/methodology/approach

The research involved a review of existing literature on consumer involvement in research, a review of user involvement in research in South West Yorkshire Mental Health NHS Trust, a survey of consumers and NHS staff in the Trust, and a skills audit and training needs analysis of consumers.

Findings

The study identified the range and extent of consumer involvement and the impact of this on consumers and the Trust. Service users and carers were involved in a range of projects, mainly on the level of consultation or collaboration. The benefits for consumers were principally on a personal level and included gaining knowledge and experience, improved sense of well‐being, self esteem, and confidence. The benefit for the Trust was in having a service user perspective and focus. However, there is a tendency to omit service users from planning and setting priorities.

Practical implications

The study pointed to the need to build the evidence base on consumer involvement in research, particularly in terms of how consumers can impact on setting research priorities and selecting appropriate methods. It identifies the need for more training for consumers and for NHS staff and for a more coherent strategy.

Originality/value

This article will be of value to anyone who is at the start or in the early stages of their journey of consumer involvement. It identifies some of the practical issues faced by consumers and staff in working collaboratively, but also points to the benefits for all the stakeholders.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2015

Chun Kit Lok

Smart card-based E-payment systems are receiving increasing attention as the number of implementations is witnessed on the rise globally. Understanding of user adoption…

Abstract

Smart card-based E-payment systems are receiving increasing attention as the number of implementations is witnessed on the rise globally. Understanding of user adoption behavior of E-payment systems that employ smart card technology becomes a research area that is of particular value and interest to both IS researchers and professionals. However, research interest focuses mostly on why a smart card-based E-payment system results in a failure or how the system could have grown into a success. This signals the fact that researchers have not had much opportunity to critically review a smart card-based E-payment system that has gained wide support and overcome the hurdle of critical mass adoption. The Octopus in Hong Kong has provided a rare opportunity for investigating smart card-based E-payment system because of its unprecedented success. This research seeks to thoroughly analyze the Octopus from technology adoption behavior perspectives.

Cultural impacts on adoption behavior are one of the key areas that this research posits to investigate. Since the present research is conducted in Hong Kong where a majority of population is Chinese ethnicity and yet is westernized in a number of aspects, assuming that users in Hong Kong are characterized by eastern or western culture is less useful. Explicit cultural characteristics at individual level are tapped into here instead of applying generalization of cultural beliefs to users to more accurately reflect cultural bias. In this vein, the technology acceptance model (TAM) is adapted, extended, and tested for its applicability cross-culturally in Hong Kong on the Octopus. Four cultural dimensions developed by Hofstede are included in this study, namely uncertainty avoidance, masculinity, individualism, and Confucian Dynamism (long-term orientation), to explore their influence on usage behavior through the mediation of perceived usefulness.

TAM is also integrated with the innovation diffusion theory (IDT) to borrow two constructs in relation to innovative characteristics, namely relative advantage and compatibility, in order to enhance the explanatory power of the proposed research model. Besides, the normative accountability of the research model is strengthened by embracing two social influences, namely subjective norm and image. As the last antecedent to perceived usefulness, prior experience serves to bring in the time variation factor to allow level of prior experience to exert both direct and moderating effects on perceived usefulness.

The resulting research model is analyzed by partial least squares (PLS)-based Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) approach. The research findings reveal that all cultural dimensions demonstrate direct effect on perceived usefulness though the influence of uncertainty avoidance is found marginally significant. Other constructs on innovative characteristics and social influences are validated to be significant as hypothesized. Prior experience does indeed significantly moderate the two influences that perceived usefulness receives from relative advantage and compatibility, respectively. The research model has demonstrated convincing explanatory power and so may be employed for further studies in other contexts. In particular, cultural effects play a key role in contributing to the uniqueness of the model, enabling it to be an effective tool to help critically understand increasingly internationalized IS system development and implementation efforts. This research also suggests several practical implications in view of the findings that could better inform managerial decisions for designing, implementing, or promoting smart card-based E-payment system.

Details

E-services Adoption: Processes by Firms in Developing Nations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-709-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 April 2010

Lyndsey Smith and Di Bailey

While the involvement of service users in mental health research has increased, a review of the literature suggests that this apparent increase in involvement does not…

Abstract

While the involvement of service users in mental health research has increased, a review of the literature suggests that this apparent increase in involvement does not necessarily coincide with service users having a ‘louder voice’ or greater control over service delivery.The purpose of this investigative study was to explore the barriers and support systems for service user‐led research within a local NHS trust. The study focused on an original research project that set out to be service user‐led by designing and piloting an evaluation tool to measure satisfaction with care planning across the trust. The paper describes a qualitative methodology that captured stakeholder's experiences of why the original project did not reach its intended conclusion. Interviews were conducted with a range of professionals and service users, alongside participant observations of steering group meetings. Data were analysed using a grounded theory approach that led to the identification of key lessons for those intending to involve service users in research in the future. The findings suggest that there are many support systems that can assist service user‐led research, but there are still too many barriers to implementing it effectively; in particular, processes surrounding ethical approval and the stigma attributed to such research by some professional staff.The lessons learned are presented to assist in the education and training of mental health service user researchers or professionals who are conducting research collaboratively with service user colleagues.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

John Gill

This article reports three years' research into the pilot phase of the Social Science Research Council's Open Door Scheme, a scheme designed to facilitate social science…

Abstract

This article reports three years' research into the pilot phase of the Social Science Research Council's Open Door Scheme, a scheme designed to facilitate social science research utilisation. Firstly, some general issues of social science utilisation are examined, followed by the background to the creation of the Council's Open Door Scheme to help meet these difficulties. Then, findings from research into the pilot phase of the scheme from 1977 to 1980 are discussed, including its future operation and potential for influencing managerial activity in its widest sense.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2020

Joanna Fox

User involvement in research is entering the mainstream of traditional mental health research. In practice, there are diverse ways in which the process of involvement is…

Abstract

Purpose

User involvement in research is entering the mainstream of traditional mental health research. In practice, there are diverse ways in which the process of involvement is experienced by mental health service user researchers. This paper aims to explore two diverse experiences of involvement by the researcher.

Design/methodology/approach

Auto-ethnography is the research methodology used in this study; it combines a process of reflective writing and critical analysis which enables the author to explore experiences of being both a service user and academic researcher. Two accounts of the author’s involvement in mental health research are presented: one which builds on a consultation model and the other based on co-production principles.

Findings

Experiences of power-sharing and collaborative decision-making, alongside disempowerment, are discussed, leading to exploration of the theoretical and practical processes for promoting participation of users in research.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited because it is undertaken by one individual in a local setting, and is therefore is not generalisable; however, it provides useful insights into the diverse processes of involvement that many service users experience.

Practical implications

Recommendations are presented to support the involvement of service users in research, with final remarks offered considering the possible future implementation of this still emerging tradition.

Originality/value

This paper reflects on the experiences of one service user academic involved in research and highlights diverse experiences of both empowering and disempowering involvement, providing recommendations for best practice.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Padraig Collins and Sarah Crowe

The purpose of this paper is to explore the limitations of the current research paradigm in mental health, particularly from a recovery perspective, and to suggest an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the limitations of the current research paradigm in mental health, particularly from a recovery perspective, and to suggest an alternative approach to clinical research which may be more in line with recovery principles.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper will first review the dominant research methodology utilised by the mental health disciplines, discussing some of the limitations of this approach, particularly from a recovery perspective. Existing research methodologies which embody recovery principles will then be outlined, before an alternative, more recovery-oriented, approach to research is discussed.

Findings

The findings from this paper suggest that the current research paradigm utilised by the mental health disciplines may not be producing the most optimal results, and that a more recovery-oriented approach could help add to the value of this research, while also involving service users and their carers in the research process in a more meaningful way.

Research limitations/implications

This paper will explore possibilities for undertaking recovery-informed research, which has implications, not only for researchers, service users and their families, but also for the practice of mental health disciplines more broadly.

Originality/value

This paper will introduce a critique of traditional research methodology in mental health and will present an alternative recovery-oriented approach which could help to overcome some of the limitations of the more traditional approach.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Anna Shaojie Cui and Fang Wu

The purpose of this research is to review empirical research on customer involvement in innovation and identify future research directions that can better connect this…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to review empirical research on customer involvement in innovation and identify future research directions that can better connect this research with marketing strategy literatures and offer opportunities for further theoretical development.

Methodology/approach

We conduct a review of empirical articles published in eight leading marketing and innovation journals between 2001 and 2017.

Findings

The review shows that the literature on customer involvement in innovation is highly diverse and fragmented, lacking a common understanding of what constitutes customer involvement in innovation and its theoretical underpinnings. There exists a multitude of conceptualizations of customer involvement in innovation, which limits effective accumulation of domain knowledge. A large number of studies have taken the customer’s perspective to examine their motivation to participate and ability to contribute, whereas less research has been done from the firm’s perspective to understand how firms may effectively manage the well-recognized challenges of customer involvement as well as the implications of customer involvement for long-term innovation strategy and overall performance. Based on the review, we offer recommendations for future research.

Practical implications

We identify important questions for future research that are highly relevant for the practice of customer involvement in innovation.

Originality/value

We provide a systematic review of the rapidly growing empirical research on customer involvement in innovation. We evaluate key points of differences in the literature and offer a synthesis that helps identify opportunities for future research.

Details

Innovation and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-828-2

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2022

Khatereh Ghasemzadeh, Octavio Escobar, Zornitsa Yordanova and Manuel Villasalero

The study examines the amplifying role of users in the e-healthcare sector and holistically show its current state and potential. The paper aims at contributing to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The study examines the amplifying role of users in the e-healthcare sector and holistically show its current state and potential. The paper aims at contributing to the scientific literature with a comprehensive review of the current state of the art on the application of user innovation (UI) in the e-healthcare sector, as a solid step for discussing the potential, trends, managerial gaps and future research avenues in this field. Despite the crucial importance of the topic and increasing attention toward it in the last few years, there is a lack of comprehensive scrutiny on different angles of involving users in health technology innovations so far.

Design/methodology/approach

This study combines two methods of bibliometric analysis and extensive content analysis of 169 journal articles on Scopus and Web of Science to unfold five research questions regarding the mechanisms of involving users, innovations characteristics and the role of users throughout the innovation process.

Findings

A clear result of the applied methodology is the profiling of users involved in e-health innovations in seven categories. The results of this study shed light on the current practice of not involving users in all the stages of the innovation process of m-health, telemedicine, self-managing technologies, which is contrary to the best practices of the UI application.

Research limitations/implications

Collection of relevant studies due to lack of comprehensibility of the keywords.

Practical implications

The offered propositions can act as a roadmap to potential research opportunities as well as to organize such innovations from a managerial perspective in particular healthcare organization managers and the middle managers operating at R&D sectors and policymakers.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind that digs out the application of UI strategies such as user-centered design in the context of e-healthcare and provides a bibliometric and extensive content analysis of the studies conducted in this theme over the years.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Tim Grayson, Yuet Hung Tsang, Dee Jolly, Kate Karban, Phillip Lomax, Claire Midgley, Ian O' Rouke, Caroline Paley, Jill Sinson, Kim Willcock and Paul Williams

This paper aims to discuss the experiences of a group of eight user and carer researchers from learning disability and mental health services who worked together in a…

228

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the experiences of a group of eight user and carer researchers from learning disability and mental health services who worked together in a research project. The research was to find out about the changes that took place as over 300 people moved from hostel accommodation into independent tenancies. These moves were part of a three year project involving a partnership between a local authority and a housing association.

Design/methodology/approach

The evaluation was based on a model of user participation.

Findings

User involvement in research can mean different things with different levels of involvement, from consultation through to user‐controlled research. In this paper the authors discuss some of the challenges in doing this kind of evaluation study, as well as the opportunities that came from involving users and carers in the research. This includes how the researchers got involved and some of the activities they did.

Research limitations/implications

The authors also describe some of the difficulties that were faced, including payments and criminal record checks. The ways in which people were trained and supported to take part and stay involved are outlined as well as how the group feel that they have learnt new skills and increased their confidence.

Originality/value

This paper adds the voices of the co‐researchers to the literature and provides “lessons learned” for other researchers in this area.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 122000