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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Saqib Ali, Taiseera AlBalushi and Ali AlBadi

The purpose of this research is to facilitate the full potential of the web for the people with disabilities. People with disabilities may fail to make full use of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to facilitate the full potential of the web for the people with disabilities. People with disabilities may fail to make full use of the potentials offered by the web even if they have the right hardware (computer and assistive technologies) as well as access to the internet because of the lack of accessibility.

Design/methodology/approach

This research outlines the guidelines that provide the foundation for building an accessibility-aware framework approach, where people with disabilities can access most of the electronic contents based on their disability levels.

Findings

The framework helps web engineers in developing accessible web pages for all types of users. Disability profile examples (blindness, low vision, deafness and hard of hearing) were taken to determine the performance of the framework approach.

Research limitations/implications

The validation and testing was carried out on the Sultan Qaboos University website. The framework approach could be further validated by performing the tests on various other public and private websites.

Practical implications

The guidelines can be used as a road map to overcome accessibility challenges during any web application development life cycle. A proper testing and evaluation is carried out on the framework to test its usability.

Social implications

Although people with disabilities are perhaps the segment of society which are expected to gain the most from these technologies, they are facing barriers to access the contents of the web because of the way it is presented. This proposed framework could assist all the people with the disability of blindness and hearing impairment to have a better experience with the internet, making the technology more beneficial and usable to them. In the future, this approach can be extended for the people with other disabilities.

Originality/value

This research provides a pioneering concept for accessibility-aware framework approach. This approach could be utilized for developing accessible web applications and electronic services for people with disabilities. The proposed framework can be used as a road map to overcome accessibility challenges during any web application development life cycle.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Jeremiah D. Still, Ashley Cain and David Schuster

Despite the widespread use of authentication schemes and the rapid emergence of novel authentication schemes, a general set of domain-specific guidelines has not yet been…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the widespread use of authentication schemes and the rapid emergence of novel authentication schemes, a general set of domain-specific guidelines has not yet been developed. This paper aims to present and explain a list of human-centered guidelines for developing usable authentication schemes.

Design/methodology/approach

The guidelines stem from research findings within the fields of psychology, human–computer interaction and information/computer science.

Findings

Instead of viewing users as the inevitable weak point in the authentication process, this study proposes that authentication interfaces be designed to take advantage of users’ natural abilities. This approach requires that one understands how interactions with authentication interfaces can be improved and what human capabilities can be exploited. A list of six guidelines that designers ought to consider when developing a new usable authentication scheme has been presented.

Research limitations/implications

This consolidated list of usable authentication guidelines provides system developers with immediate access to common design issues impacting usability. These guidelines ought to assist designers in producing more secure products in fewer costly development cycles.

Originality/value

Cybersecurity research and development has mainly focused on technical solutions to increase security. However, the greatest weakness of many systems is the user. It is argued that authentication schemes with poor usability are inherently insecure, as users will inadvertently weaken the security in their efforts to use the system. The study proposes that designers need to consider the human factors that impact end-user behavior. Development from this perspective will address the greatest weakness in most security systems by increasing end-user compliance.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Jennifer Rowley and Frances Slack

Databases on CDROM are one of the more complex types of facility that will be accessed by the general public, either in their home, in airport lounges and other public…

Abstract

Databases on CDROM are one of the more complex types of facility that will be accessed by the general public, either in their home, in airport lounges and other public arenas or in libraries. These databases extend over a wide range of different media types including bibliographic, full‐text and multimedia. Interfaces include DOS‐based and GUI‐based products. This paper reviews the literature on the design and evaluation of user interfaces on CDROM, with the objective of distilling guidelines for these activities. More specifically the article defines interfaces, dialogues and interaction, and explores the diversity in and issues associated with standardisation in interface design for CDROMs. Current criteria and guidelines for the evaluation of CDROM interfaces include those of the Special Interest Group on CDROM Applications and Technology (SIGCAT) and guidelines proposed by other authors. Using this earlier work as a basis an alternative set of guidelines is proposed.

Details

Online and CD-Rom Review, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1353-2642

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2010

Guillermo Horacio Ramirez Caceres and Yoshimi Teshigawara

The level of security of home information systems can be described as their capacity to resist all the accidental or deliberate malicious activities based on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The level of security of home information systems can be described as their capacity to resist all the accidental or deliberate malicious activities based on the evaluation assurance levels (EAL) as defined in international standards. The purpose of this paper is to propose a security guideline tool for home users based on the implementation of a protection profile (PP) for home user systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The application was developed in three basic steps. First, a PP for home user systems was created on the basis of the international standard ISO/IEC 15408. Then, the paper created a knowledge base including the PP information, as well as a security policy including other international standards, as mentioned above. Finally, the paper created a web application tool to be used as a security guideline for home users.

Findings

This tool is developed in order to support users to understand the threats which affect their environment and select the appropriate security policy. By using this tool, users can access information about international standards in accordance to their level of knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

The authors created a tool based on EAL4. In the future, tools based on EAL1, EAL2, and EAL3 can be created easily on the basis of the present model.

Originality/value

This PP specifies the security requirements for home user information technology (IT) environments, and makes use of the Department of Defense information assurance guidelines and policies as a basis for establishing the requirements necessary for meeting the security objectives. This PP is constructed for use as a reference for home users to create safe home IT environments. Operating systems evaluated against this PP can operate at EAL4.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Marion Judd

The quality of clinical care is a fundamental issue for both providers and recipients. It seems logical for the parties to collaborate. Increasing understanding of each…

Abstract

The quality of clinical care is a fundamental issue for both providers and recipients. It seems logical for the parties to collaborate. Increasing understanding of each other's values and perceived needs with commitment to incorporating both users' and clinicians' unique perspectives on clinical quality and effectiveness is a new venture which will further contribute to improving the quality of health care in the NHS.

Details

Journal of Clinical Effectiveness, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-5874

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2005

Chadia Abras, Ant Ozok and Jenny Preece

E‐learning is becoming a major component in academia today. Therefore, the success of e‐learning online communities is crucial in order to ensure their permanency and…

Abstract

E‐learning is becoming a major component in academia today. Therefore, the success of e‐learning online communities is crucial in order to ensure their permanency and effectiveness. There is a need for formalized guidelines in e‐learning that instruct the designer (course instructor) on how to design, maintain, and manage a course. Some research has been done on the subject, but none proposes formalized guidelines, and none draws the results from the users’ perspectives. The users, students in this case, should be at the heart of the design and their thoughts, wishes, and needs should be implemented in the user‐centered design. In this study, through an iterative testing approach, the researchers formalized and validated a set of design heuristics that instruct an online educator on how to design, manage, deliver, and nurture an e‐Learning online community.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2020

Galen R. Collins

Service robotics, a branch of robotics that entails the development of robots able to assist humans in their environment, is of growing interest in the hospitality…

Abstract

Purpose

Service robotics, a branch of robotics that entails the development of robots able to assist humans in their environment, is of growing interest in the hospitality industry. Designing effective autonomous service robots, however, requires an understanding of Human–Robot Interaction (HRI), a relatively young discipline dedicated to understanding, designing, and evaluating robotic systems for use by or with humans. HRI has not yet received sufficient attention in hospitality robotic design, much like Human–Computer Interaction (HCI) in property management system design in the 1980s. This article proposes a set of introductory HRI guidelines with implementation standards for autonomous hospitality service robots.

Design/methodology/approach

A set of key user-centered HRI guidelines for hospitality service robots were extracted from 52 research articles. These are organized into service performance categories to provide more context for their application in hospitality settings.

Findings

Based on an extensive literature review, this article presents some HRI guidelines that may drive higher levels of acceptance of service robots in customer-facing situations. Deriving meaningful HRI guidelines requires an understanding of how customers evaluate service interactions with humans in hospitality settings and to what degree those will differ with service robots.

Originality/value

Robots are challenging assumptions on how hospitality businesses operate. They are being increasingly deployed by hotels and restaurants to boost productivity and maintain service levels. Effective HRI guidelines incorporate user requirements and expectations in the design specifications. Compilation of such information for designers of hospitality service robots will offer a clearer roadmap for them to follow.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

M. Landoni, R. Wilson and F. Gibb

This paper starts by reporting the results of two studies into electronic book production, the Visual Book and the WEB Book. The Visual Book study (Landoni, 1997) explored…

Abstract

This paper starts by reporting the results of two studies into electronic book production, the Visual Book and the WEB Book. The Visual Book study (Landoni, 1997) explored the importance of the visual component of the book metaphor for the production of more effective electronic books, while the WEB Book study (Wilson, 1999) took the findings of the Visual Book and applied them to the production of books for publication on the WWW. It was possible to extract from the two experiences a set of recommendations for producing electronic books. These are the starting point for a new project, EBONI (Electronic Books ON‐screen Interface). EBONI focuses on the evaluation of electronic resources for teaching and learning in academia and it is going to expand our previous findings with the aim of producing a set of guidelines for publishing educational material on the Web.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Kin Wai Michael Siu and Kwun Sing Leo Wong

This paper aims to propose a set of flexible design principles for enhancing the flexibility of street furniture to deal with the diverse and changing urban environment…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a set of flexible design principles for enhancing the flexibility of street furniture to deal with the diverse and changing urban environment. Flexibility is an important but less considered element of public design (otherwise called public environment and facility design), especially in regard to the street furniture that is encountered in everyday life. Taking Hong Kong as a case study, this paper gives an overview of the concepts of flexibility and flexible design, and identifies the current limitations and problems of the current street furniture design practices with respect to the diverse and changing urban environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a review of the current literature and relevant documentation, interviews with government officers and different groups of users (including those with special needs), and field observations in Hong Kong’s urban areas over a period of four years, the policies relating to street furniture design in Hong Kong and its management and implementation were evaluated.

Findings

The results indicate that the current street furniture in Hong Kong is unable to adapt to or resist changes, can easily cause safety and management problems and is not adaptable to new developments. This paper proposes six principles for the flexible design of street furniture, namely, custom in use, multifunctional use, responds effectively to changing circumstances, easily and conveniently managed, universal in use and sustainable in use.

Research limitations/implications

It is difficult to understand the diverse needs and preferences of different users in urban environments. The findings in this paper are based on intensive field work and broad industry experience. To deal with the rapid and ongoing urban change, this paper recommends a further long-term and in-depth study of street furniture.

Practical implications

Based on the findings, this paper proposes six flexible design principles for designing street furniture that is sufficiently flexible to meet the rapid and ongoing urban change and diverse users’ needs.

Social implications

Different societies and urban areas faced different types and levels of changes. Therefore, a flexible approach to street furniture design is important and necessary.

Originality/value

The findings of this paper and the proposed six flexible design principles can provide insight and direction for government officials, design and planning professionals, developers, utility and management companies and communities on how to embed public design (i.e. policy, implementation and management) in the future.

Details

Facilities, vol. 33 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 20 December 2007

Mohammad Eyadat and Dorothy Fisher

The purpose of this research is to examine web accessibility initiative (WAI) guidelines for web accessibility so as to incorporate web accessibility in information…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine web accessibility initiative (WAI) guidelines for web accessibility so as to incorporate web accessibility in information systems (IS) curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used the WebXact software accessibility evaluation tool to test the top pages of web sites of the 23 California State University (CSU) campuses in order to identify the level of compliance to federal standards. The authors also designed and conducted a questionnaire to survey the students who were enrolled in the first web development course at CSU, Dominguez Hills to access their knowledge and skills in various web accessibility topics.

Findings

The research findings show that the majority of the CSU campuses' top web pages failed to meet WAI guidelines at some point. Moreover, two‐thirds of the students who responded to the survey have no knowledge of web accessibility topics included in the questionnaires. The results indicate that IS programs failed to incorporate accessibility in their curricula and produce web developers with the skills and knowledge in web accessibility.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of this research is that the sample size is small. The authors intend to increase the number of universities' web site in the test and survey all students in the IS program in a future study.

Practical implications

This research is background work that will help the authors to incorporate accessibility topics in their web development courses that include web accessibility basic concepts, universal design, Section 508 of the US Rehabilitation Act, web content accessibility guidelines, WAI guidelines for web accessibility, and web accessibility testing tools.

Originality/value

This research improves the current state of web accessibility in curriculum higher education.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

Keywords

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