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Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2004

Kerstin Röse

This chapter is focused on the specification and integration of intercultural variables for human machine systems and the description of content analysis for these…

Abstract

This chapter is focused on the specification and integration of intercultural variables for human machine systems and the description of content analysis for these variables. Starting with basics of culture-oriented design, these are followed by an approach to machine localization issues and a cost model, then basics of the intercultural design and human machine system engineering process, a definition and specification of intercultural variables, a systematic treatment for their integration into the process, and a description of how to use these variables in the process. Finally, an example of an intercultural variables approach to “information coding” in a human-machine system is presented for China and Germany.

Details

Cultural Ergonomics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-049-4

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Mumin Abubakre, M.N. Ravishankar and Crispin Coombs

Organisational implementations of information technology (IT) normally fail due to cultural forces that inhibit the usage levels required to facilitate successful IT…

Abstract

Purpose

Organisational implementations of information technology (IT) normally fail due to cultural forces that inhibit the usage levels required to facilitate successful IT implementation. The purpose of this paper is to explore IT implementation from an IT culture perspective (Leidner and Kayworth, 2006). In particular, it identifies and follows the trajectory of IT culture archetypes that emerge during the implementation process and further investigates their role in facilitating successful IT implementations.

Design/methodology/approach

This research adopts the qualitative single case study approach and draws on the implementation of a management information system in a Nigerian global bank.

Findings

The findings illustrate three different IT culture archetypes and provide insights into their dynamic nature. The progressive weakening of two IT culture archetypes and the corresponding strengthening of the third archetype shows how initial vision conflicts can get transformed into vision agreements.

Originality/value

This paper extends the IT culture perspective by illustrating how a congruence relationship between IT cultures and IT artefacts can be fostered. The paper shows how diverse IT cultures can develop reasonably quickly in line with initial user experiences of a system. When IT cultures are aligned with the values embedded in IT, positive engagement and usage of the technology results strengthening the presence of embracing IT cultures.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2021

Mona Mohamed, Tobin Porterfield and Joyram Chakraborty

This study aims to examine the impact of cultural familiarity with images on the memorability of recognition-based graphical password (RBG-P).

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of cultural familiarity with images on the memorability of recognition-based graphical password (RBG-P).

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers used a between-group design with two groups of 50 participants from China and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, using a webtool and two questionnaires to test two hypotheses in a four-week long study.

Findings

The results showed that culture has significant effects on RBG-P memorability, including both recognition and recall of images. It was also found that the login success rate depreciated quickly as time progressed, which indicates the memory decay and its effects on the visual memory.

Research limitations/implications

Collectively, these results can be used to design universal RBG-Ps with maximal password deflection points. For better cross-cultural designs, designers must allow users from different cultures to personalize their image selections based on their own cultures.

Practical implications

The RBG-P interfaces developed without consideration for userscultures may lead to the construction of passwords that are difficult to memorize and easy to attack. Thus, the incorporation of cultural images is indispensable for improving the authentication posture.

Social implications

The development of RBG-P with cultural considerations will make it easy for the user population to remember the password and make it more expensive for the intruder to attack.

Originality/value

This study provides an insight for RBG-P developers to produce a graphical password platform that increases the memorability factor.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Joseph Deodato

The purpose of this paper is to offer a theoretical framework for applying Web 2.0 technologies and design principles to the development of participatory cultures within…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a theoretical framework for applying Web 2.0 technologies and design principles to the development of participatory cultures within libraries. A participatory culture is one that focusses on facilitating interaction and the creation of content by users rather than the consumption of content created or compiled by experts.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a literature-based theoretical analysis that explores the role of libraries as agents of cultural hegemony and techniques for developing socially responsible library praxis. It combines insights from a variety of discourses including Western Marxist theories of hegemony, critical theories of library and information science, professional literature regarding “Library 2.0” service models, and media studies theories of participatory culture.

Findings

Libraries do not just organize knowledge; they construct it. Furthermore, these constructions tend to reinforce dominant discourses while marginalizing others. By adopting participatory technologies and design principles, libraries can support greater diversity of expression and create spaces for marginalized discourses.

Practical implications

This paper offers suggestions for applying principles of participatory culture to the design of library services such as collection development, cataloging and classification, reference, instruction, and institutional repositories.

Originality/value

This paper provides a conceptual framework for understanding and evaluating the significance of Web 2.0 for library and information science by applying theoretical perspectives from other disciplines.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 70 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2020

Ahmed Housni Alsswey, Hosam Al-Samarraie, Fuad Ali El-Qirem, Ahmed Ibrahim Alzahrani and Osama Alfarraj

Designers of mobile applications have long understood the importance of users’ preferences in making the user experience easier, convenient and therefore valuable. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Designers of mobile applications have long understood the importance of users’ preferences in making the user experience easier, convenient and therefore valuable. The cultural aspects of groups of users are among the key features of users’ design preferences, because each group’s preferences depend on various features that are culturally compatible. The process of integrating culture into the design of a system has always been an important ingredient for effective and interactive human computer interface. This study aims to investigate the design of a mobile health (mHealth) application user interface (UI) based on Arabic culture. It was argued that integrating certain cultural values of specific groups of users into the design of UI would increase their acceptance of the technology.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 135 users responded to an online survey about their acceptance of a culturally designed mHealth.

Findings

The findings showed that culturally based language, colours, layout and images had a significant relationship with users’ behavioural intention to use the culturally based mHealth UI.

Research limitations/implications

First, the sample and the data collected of this study were restricted to Arab users and Arab culture; therefore, the results cannot be generalized to other cultures and users. Second, the adapted unified theory of acceptance and use of technology model was used in this study instead of the new version, which may expose new perceptions. Third, the cultural aspects of UI design in this study were limited to the images, colours, language and layout.

Practical implications

It encourages UI designers to implement the relevant cultural aspects while developing mobile applications.

Originality/value

Embedding Arab cultural aspects in designing UI for mobile applications to satisfy Arab users and enhance their acceptance toward using mobile applications, which will reflect positively on their lives.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2020

Mona Mohamed, Joyram Chakraborty and Sharma Pillutla

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of culture on the cross-cultural design of the recognition-based graphical password (RBG-P) interface as inferred from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of culture on the cross-cultural design of the recognition-based graphical password (RBG-P) interface as inferred from Chinese and Saudi subjects’ image selections.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a between-group design adopted using two groups of participants from China and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to measure the differences caused by the effects of cultures on graphical password image selections. Three hypotheses have been tested in a four-week long study carried out using two questionnaires and an RBG-P webtool designed for images selection.

Findings

The results have indicated that participants are equally biased not only toward their own culture but also depending on their opinions about other cultures. In addition, when creating the password, it has been observed that culture not only influenced the image selection to create the password but also have an effect on the sequence of the images forming the password.

Research limitations/implications

Appropriately used image selection differences can be used appropriately in cross-cultural designs that will lead to better development of culturally adaptive interfaces that will boost the security posture of RBG-P authentication.

Practical implications

Some RBG-P interfaces that are produced outside the designer’s culture may suffer the effects of cultural differences. Hence, to incorporate culture in the interface, authentication systems within applications should be flexible by designing images that fit the culture in which the software will be used. To this end, access control interface testing should also be carried out in the environmental and cultural context in which it is will be used.

Originality/value

This paper provides useful information for international developers who develop cross-cultural usable secure designs. In such environments, the cross-culturally designs may have significant effects on the acceptability and adoption adaptation of the interface to multi-cultural settings.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Peter Woolliams and David Gee

In order to enhance, consolidate and differentiate online services, developers are increasingly becoming concerned with issues of usability. Lists of design guidelines and…

Abstract

In order to enhance, consolidate and differentiate online services, developers are increasingly becoming concerned with issues of usability. Lists of design guidelines and evaluations of existing systems are extensive but attempts to place this applied science on a rigorous footing have largely failed. Despite legitimate advances in HCI (Human‐computer Interaction), no clear set of principles has emerged that is relevant to practitioners or vendors of online systems. Most previous studies have been concerned with designing the system for a ‘standard’ user. This paper will present some early findings of our work concerned with discriminating the relative effects of the cultural values of users and their organisational setting in configuring online systems.

Details

Online Review, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Juan Miguel Alcántara-Pilar and Salvador Del Barrio-García

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the moderating role of the cultural dimensions of long-term orientation (LTO) and individualism (IND) on the relationships between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the moderating role of the cultural dimensions of long-term orientation (LTO) and individualism (IND) on the relationships between satisfaction online, message involvement (MI) and perceived usefulness (PU) of the web site on attitude toward the web site.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors chose a between-subjects experimental design, using culture (Spanish vs British) as the independent variable. Two versions of a web site for a fictitious tourist destination were created – one written in Spanish and the other in English. The sample comprised 491 users.

Findings

The findings indicate that the LTO dimension moderates the relationship between satisfaction online and PU on attitude toward the web site. The relationships between MI and attitude toward the web site could not be confirmed.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this study is the comparison of only two cultures, Spain vs the UK.

Practical implications

The key implication is that if marketers and web site designers can better understand how national cultural differences moderate the attitude formation and change process among tourists, this will enable them to market their destinations and services more effectively. National cultural differences explain the differences found in the effect of satisfaction and PU on attitude toward the web site.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few analyzing the moderating effect of LTO and IND on three antecedents of attitude toward the web site. The original cultural values established by Hofstede (2001) were tested among the present sample to establish the extent to which they remain true today. To create an authentic browsing scenario for the experiment, a web site was specially designed for a fictitious tourist destination, with its own domain name (buyada.org). Subjects were invited to browse the site freely while carrying out the task assigned to them. This approach contributed added value to the research by simulating the real behavior of tourists who are faced with a range of choices when putting together a tourism package for a given destination.

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Meng-Hsiang Hsu, Shih-Wei Tien, Hsien-Cheng Lin and Chun-Ming Chang

Drawing upon the literature of Uses and Gratifications (U & G) Theory, the purpose of this paper is to propose that entertainment, information seeking…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon the literature of Uses and Gratifications (U & G) Theory, the purpose of this paper is to propose that entertainment, information seeking, socialization, and self-presentation are the motivational factors affecting continuance intention of social media. This paper further investigates the moderating effects of cultural difference and socio-economic status on the link between these motivational factors and continuance intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from the 493 active users of Facebook in five countries (Australia, Austria, Japan, Taiwan, and the USA) were used to test the proposed model. Partial least squares method was used to assess the relationships in the model and the subgroup analysis method was employed as well to examine the moderating roles of cultural difference and socio-economic status.

Findings

Information seeking exerts stronger effect on continuance intention for users from individualistic cultures, while socialization, and self-presentation has stronger influence on continuance intention for users from collective cultures. Entertainment has stronger influence on continuance for high educated users, whereas self-presentation has stronger influence on continuance intention for users with lower level of education. Finally, the effect of entertainment, information seeking on continuance intention is stronger for users with higher level of income, while self-presentation has stronger influence on continuance intention for users with lower level of income.

Originality/value

This study is one of first studies to extend the research context of U & G Theory from adoption of social media to continuance intention of social media. This study is also the first to investigate the moderating roles of cultural difference and socio-economic statuses in social media usage behavior simultaneously.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Louise F. Spiteri

New social discovery systems have social‐type Web 2.0 features that allow users to enhance the content of bibliographic records by adding their own tags, ratings, and…

Abstract

Purpose

New social discovery systems have social‐type Web 2.0 features that allow users to enhance the content of bibliographic records by adding their own tags, ratings, and reviews. One of the primary underlying principles of cataloguing is that catalogue records be designed with the user in mind, i.e. user convenience. The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between the principle of user convenience and social discovery systems.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature and codes of ethics of associations of information professions was undertaken to examine: the ethical dimensions of creating catalogue records to reflect user convenience, the relationship between culture and user convenience, and how social discovery tools can facilitate the creation of interactive and flexible catalogue records that reflect the culture(s) and needs of the library communities in which they exist.

Findings

Social discovery systems can address the primary barriers to creating catalogue records that meet user convenience: determining and reflecting the needs and cultural warrant of the users, and maintaining the quality and integrity of the catalogue records.

Practical implications

Social discovery systems can serve as a bridge between cataloguers' desire to create accurate catalogue records that conform to accepted cataloguing standards, and their ethical imperative to ensure that these records meet the needs of the clients.

Originality/value

The findings of this study pave the way for further research into how user‐contributed metadata allow clients to express their needs and cultural warrant and to interact with one another and library staff.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 68 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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