Search results

1 – 10 of over 10000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2021

Surajit Bag, Gautam Srivastava, Md Mamoon Al Bashir, Sushma Kumari, Mihalis Giannakis and Abdul Hannan Chowdhury

The first research objective is to understand the role of digital [artificial intelligence (AI)] technologies on user engagement and conversion that has resulted in high…

Abstract

Purpose

The first research objective is to understand the role of digital [artificial intelligence (AI)] technologies on user engagement and conversion that has resulted in high online activities and increased online sales in current times in India. In addition, combined with changes such as social distancing and lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic, digital disruption has largely impacted the old ways of communication both at the individual and organizational levels, ultimately resulting in prominent social change. While interacting in the virtual world, this change is more noticeable. Therefore, the second research objective is to examine if a satisfying experience during online shopping leads to repurchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Using primary data collected from consumers in a developing economy (India), we tested the theoretical model to further extend the theoretical debate in consumer research.

Findings

This study empirically tests and further establishes that deploying AI technologies have a positive relationship with user engagement and conversion. Further, conversion leads to satisfying user experience. Finally, the relationship between satisfying user experience and repurchase intention is also found to be significant.

Originality/value

The uniqueness of this study is that it tests few key relationships related to user engagement during this uncertain period (COVID-19 pandemic) and examines the underlying mechanism which leads to increase in online sales.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 December 2018

Jarosław Jankowski, Juho Hamari and Jarosław Wątróbski

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a method that can gradually find a sweet spot between user experience and visual intensity of website elements to maximise…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a method that can gradually find a sweet spot between user experience and visual intensity of website elements to maximise user conversion with minimal adverse effect.

Design/methodology/approach

In the first phase of the study, the authors develop the method. In the second stage, the authors test and evaluate the method via an empirical study; also, an experiment was conducted within web interface with the gradual intensity of visual elements.

Findings

The findings reveal that the negative response grows faster than conversion when the visual intensity of the web interface is increased. However, a saturation point, where there is coexistence between maximum conversion and minimum negative response, can be found.

Practical implications

The findings imply that efforts to attract user attention should be pursued with increased caution and that a gradual approach presented in this study helps in finding a site-specific sweet spot for a level of visual intensity by incrementally adjusting the elements of the interface and tracking the changes in user behaviour.

Originality/value

Web marketing and advertising professionals often face the dilemma of determining the optimal level of visual intensity of interface element. Excessive use of marketing component and attention-grabbing visual elements can lead to an inferior user experience and consequent user churn due to growing intrusiveness. At the same time, too little visual intensity can fail to steer users. The present study provides a gradual approach which aids in finding a balance between user experience and visual intensity, maximising user conversion and, thus, providing a practical solution for the problem.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1970

Paul Reilly

THE history of design in manufacture over the last two hundred and fifty years could almost be compressed into three words—integration, disintegration, reintegration—for…

Abstract

THE history of design in manufacture over the last two hundred and fifty years could almost be compressed into three words—integration, disintegration, reintegration—for that broadly has been the sequence of development from the days of handcraftsmanship, through the mechanization of the first industrial revolution, to the present age of swiftly changing technology. In the pre‐industrial era, integration between design and manufacture was complete since the designer and maker were one. In many cases, too, the maker was also the retailer or distributor, selling in his front room what he had made in his back room and knowing his customers as well as he knew himself.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

30-Minute Website Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-078-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Hilde T. Remøy and Sara J. Wilkinson

The City of Melbourne seeks to retrofit 1,200 CBD properties by 2020 as part of the strategy to become carbon neutral, whilst Amsterdam aims to cut CO2 emissions 40 per…

Downloads
2521

Abstract

Purpose

The City of Melbourne seeks to retrofit 1,200 CBD properties by 2020 as part of the strategy to become carbon neutral, whilst Amsterdam aims to cut CO2 emissions 40 per cent by 2025. Oversupply in the Amsterdam office market makes conversion to residential use viable. In examining converted buildings in Amsterdam and the Melbourne CBD typical attributes of converted stock can be identified to target retrofit measures. This paper seeks to focus on these initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

In Amsterdam five case studies were undertaken to reveal and define building attributes that explain the viability of these conversions. On the other hand, the Melbourne study was based on a database assembled containing all Melbourne CBD office building adaptations carried out between 1998 and 2008. The research analysed the conversion of office buildings and the scope for sustainable retrofit evaluating a limited number of attributes known to be important in adaptation.

Findings

The outcomes of this research showed similarities and differences in scope, which are relevant to all urban areas where adaptation of office buildings can mitigate the impacts of climate change and enhance a city for another generation of citizens and users.

Practical implications

The outcomes highlight the property attributes that explain conversion viability and that are most strongly associated with conversions. In addition the research identifies some sustainability measures that are possible with this type of stock.

Originality/value

The paper compares and contrasts qualitative data from a small sample of buildings in Amsterdam with quantitative data from a census of all change of use adaptations in Melbourne from 1998 to 2008. The contrasting approaches make it possible both to explain the driving forces of adaptations and to deliver statistical evidence of what is described in the case studies. Despite the differing approaches it is possible to compare and contrast the attributes of properties from both cities.

Details

Property Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 April 2021

Sunil Atulkar and Ashish Kumar Singh

Today the mobile apps are helping customers in every means of their life by exploring information related to electronic items and even for food items also. Therefore, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Today the mobile apps are helping customers in every means of their life by exploring information related to electronic items and even for food items also. Therefore, the main aim of this study is to examine the influencing role of psychological and technological attributes on customer conversion to use food ordering apps.

Design/methodology/approach

Convenience sampling method was used to collect responses from the customer's age between 18 and 35 years to get more representation of society. 374 customer's data has been used for structural equation model analysis with the help of SmartPLS 3.0 and SPSS-20 software.

Findings

Findings showed that customer conversions are positively influenced by perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, perceived incentives, perceived information, customer relationship management and order management system. In contrast, the perceived price and visual design show insignificant influence.

Research limitations/implications

Research outcome provides some valuable insights to provide direction to all online food aggregators to design their apps according to customers need. Thus, the authentic customer reviews and the facility of providing feedbacks are very fruitful for attracting new user while using and placing orders through theses apps.

Practical implications

Study suggested that observing satisfaction and dissatisfaction levels of the customer helps in enhancing the facilities of food ordering apps, so that the customer would enjoy the whole order process seamlessly, which automatically leads to customer conversions.

Originality/value

Major contribution of this study is the empirical analysis of psychological and technological attributes on customer's conversion towards food ordering app.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 November 1992

Karen Horny

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-616-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Mats G. Holm and Jan Bröchner

While service quality receives growing attention in the construction industry, few studies have dealt with the relation between craftsmen and building users. However, when…

Abstract

While service quality receives growing attention in the construction industry, few studies have dealt with the relation between craftsmen and building users. However, when office staff are present in the building during conversion projects (refurbishment or office completion) craftsmen and users will interact. To analyse how this craftsman‐user interaction leads to satisfied or dissatisfied users and ultimately to reputations in the market, a questionnaire survey of office staff and craftsmen in two refurbishment and one office completion project has been carried out. While critical incidents are not as important as expected, the service provided by the contractor appears to be the key to improved reputation. Furthermore, minimizing noise and dust produced should reduce the number of negative views from building users. Findings from the craftsmen survey identify information and work satisfaction as fundamental ingredients for a contractor striving for a positive relation with the users.

Details

Facilities, vol. 18 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Virginia Ortiz‐Repiso and Yolanda Ríos

Library automation in Spain has undergone considerable growth during the 1990s, with the university library sector in particular making efforts to keep up with automation…

Downloads
77

Abstract

Library automation in Spain has undergone considerable growth during the 1990s, with the university library sector in particular making efforts to keep up with automation trends. Due to the installation of automated management systems in nearly all universities, the creation of university library networks, and the growing accessibility of automated bibliographic information as well as online information such as CDROM, it can be said that university library automation (as opposed to other library sectors) is becoming well established and is developing in a standardised fashion. It is clear that this standardisation aids interlibrary communication, although there is a considerable amount of ground still to be covered. The exchange of bibliographical information required by the Spanish Library System Law (Reglamento del Sistema Español de Bibliotecas) falls well short of what is really needed. The business of cataloguing and classifying library stock continues to take up a lot of time. If shared cataloguing existed, this time could and should be spent on improving user services. The National Library is still not the figurehead of the Spanish system. In conclusion, there is still an appreciable lack of organisation and, on many occasions, projects are started without the necessary planning.

Details

Online and CD-Rom Review, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1353-2642

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

E.G. Sieverts, J. Figdor, S. Bakker and M. Hofstede

In this series, specifications, properties and test results of microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval are listed and compared. This article is…

Abstract

In this series, specifications, properties and test results of microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval are listed and compared. This article is devoted to the previously defined category of end‐user software, sometimes also referred to as bibliographic formatting software. Eight different programs have been tested and assessed: Archivist, BIB/Search, Library Master, Notebook II, Papyrus, Pro‐Cite, The Ref‐Filer and Reference Manager. All programs run under MS‐DOS, though there are also Apple Macintosh versions for Pro‐Cite and Reference Manager. For each of the eight programs about 100 facts and test results are tabulated. All the programs are individually discussed as well.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

1 – 10 of over 10000