Search results

1 – 8 of 8
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Curdin Pfister, Simone N. Tuor Sartore and Uschi Backes-Gellner

The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical evidence for individual educational investment decisions and to investigate the relative importance of two factors, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical evidence for individual educational investment decisions and to investigate the relative importance of two factors, the type of education (vocational vs academic) and subject area (e.g. commercial or health), in determining variance in earnings.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 1,200 individuals based on the 2011 Swiss Adult Education Survey, Mincer-type earnings equations are estimated. The variance in earnings is decomposed with respect to the two factors mentioned above, which allows to quantify the relative contributions of type of education and subject area to variance in earnings.

Findings

The results of the variance decomposition show that subject area explains nearly twice the variance in earnings compared with that explained by type of education.

Social implications

As results show that earnings variance – and thereby risk – relate more to subject area than to type of education, this study suggests that for individuals caring about the risk of their educational decision the selection of a specific subject area is more relevant than the choice between vocational and academic tracks; in addition, educational policies as part of HRM policies should devote as much attention to the choice of subject areas as to vocational or academic education. This is especially important for companies or countries planning to introduce or to extend vocational education as part of their human resources strategies.

Originality/value

This study is the first to show whether earnings vary more by type of education or by subject area.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Uschi Backes-Gellner, Christian Rupietta and Simone N. Tuor Sartore

The purpose of this paper is to examine spillover effects across differently educated workers. For the first time, the authors consider “reverse” spillover effects, i.e…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine spillover effects across differently educated workers. For the first time, the authors consider “reverse” spillover effects, i.e. spillover effects from secondary-educated workers with dual vocational education and training (VET) to tertiary-educated workers with academic education. The authors argue that, due to structural differences in training methodology and content, secondary-educated workers with VET degrees have knowledge that tertiary academically educated workers do not have.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use data from a large employer-employee data set: the Swiss Earnings Structure Survey. The authors estimate ordinary least squares and fixed effects panel-data models to identify such “reverse” spillover effects. Moreover, the authors consider the endogenous workforce composition.

Findings

The authors find that tertiary-educated workers have higher productivity when working together with secondary-educated workers with VET degrees. The instrumental variable estimations support this finding. The functional form of the reverse spillover effect is inverted-U-shaped. This means that at first the reverse spillover effect from an additional secondary-educated worker is positive but diminishing.

Research limitations/implications

The results imply that firms need to combine different types of workers because their different kinds of knowledge produce spillover effects and thereby lead to overall higher productivity.

Originality/value

The traditional view of spillover effects assumes that tertiary-educated workers create spillover effects toward secondary-educated workers. However, the authors show that workers who differ in their type of education (academic vs vocational) may also create reverse spillover effects.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Uschi Backes-Gellner and Stefan C. Wolter

Downloads
1065

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Simone N. Tuor and Uschi Backes‐Gellner

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the rates of return and the risks of different types of educational paths – all leading to a tertiary educational degree. The…

Downloads
1431

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the rates of return and the risks of different types of educational paths – all leading to a tertiary educational degree. The paper seeks to distinguish a purely academic educational path from a purely vocational path and a mixed path with loops through both systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper studies the labor market outcome to compare earnings and calculate net return rates as well as risk measures to investigate whether different educational paths are characterized by different risk‐return trade‐offs. Entrepreneurs are separated from employees in order to examine whether for the same combination of education the labour market outcomes differ between the two groups.

Findings

The empirical results are based on the Swiss Labor Force Survey (SLFS) and demonstrate that mixed educational paths are well rewarded in the labor market. However, for entrepreneurs a high return is also associated with a high income variance.

Research limitations/implications

The findings provide evidence for the existence of complementarities between vocational and academic education. Further research on mixed educational paths might provide more insight into this presumed relationship.

Practical implications

Since the results indicate that mixed educational paths are a worthwhile strategy, the permeability of a national education system is a very important educational policy issue.

Originality/value

The study is innovative in three ways: first, it focuses on complete educational paths and not just the highest educational degree. Second, an alternative measure, the Baldwin rate of return, is used to assess the profitability attached to different educational paths. Third, the income risk associated with each educational path is calculated.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Jens Mohrenweiser and Uschi Backes‐Gellner

The purpose of this paper is to derive an empirical method to identify different types of training strategies of companies based on publicly available company data.

Downloads
2886

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to derive an empirical method to identify different types of training strategies of companies based on publicly available company data.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a ten‐year panel, the within‐firm retention rate, defined as the average proportion of apprentices staying in a company in relation to all apprenticeship graduates of a company over several years, was analyzed. The within‐firm retention rate is used to identify these companies' training strategies.

Findings

It was shown that companies' motivation for apprenticeship training in Germany is not homogeneous: 19 percent of all companies follow a substitution strategy and 44 percent follow an investment strategy. The determinants of the substitution strategy were estimated and, for example, sizeable differences were found between sectors with different skill requirements and between firms' coverage of industrial relations.

Research limitations/implications

The method is well suited to classify substitution‐motivated training firms but it is less precise in identifying the investment motivation. Moreover, very small firms which train only one apprentice need longer panel duration for precise results and therefore the classification results are less precise for very small firms.

Practical implications

The classification can be used to identify determinants of company participation in apprenticeship training and to predict changes in demand for apprentices.

Originality/value

A simple and innovative method of identifying different types of training motivation with publicly available company data was derived, which has so far been possible only with very detailed company‐specific apprenticeship surveys.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Audrey Dumas and Saïd Hanchane

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects of job‐training programs, initiated by the Moroccan government and called “special training contracts”, on the…

Downloads
3151

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects of job‐training programs, initiated by the Moroccan government and called “special training contracts”, on the performance of Moroccan firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Two databases (MICT, OFPPT) of Moroccan firms were considered. Matched databases were completed using a questionnaire survey. Panel data with 322 firms from 2001 to 2003 were obtained.

Findings

The paper highlights that “special training contracts” is an efficient measure of public policy. Indeed, job‐training programs increase the competitiveness and performance of Moroccan firms. Additionally, it was shown that firms have different perceptions of the role of public policy. It was emphasised that training effects are higher when training is considered as part of a human resources development strategy. On the contrary, when firms view public policy as just a financing opportunity, they do not get any returns from training.

Practical implications

A better understanding of the role of STC may increase training efficiency.

Originality/value

The case of an emerging country, Morocco, was studied. The conclusion of the analysis could provide solutions linking human resources management to issues of growth and long‐term development.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Mika Maliranta, Satu Nurmi and Hanna Virtanen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants of labour market outcomes after the initial vocational basic education (ISCED 3).

Downloads
1138

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants of labour market outcomes after the initial vocational basic education (ISCED 3).

Design/methodology/approach

A multinomial logit model is used for examining the effect of school resources and other factors on students' post‐schooling outcomes defined as employment, further studies, non‐employment and dropping out. Analysis has been done by using unique linked register data on students, their parents, teachers, educational organisations and business companies in Finland.

Findings

The results indicate that teaching expenditures do not matter but teachers' characteristics have a role to play. Teachers with a university degree increase the employment probability of the students, whereas the formal competence of the teachers does not have such positive effects. The students' characteristics and performance in comprehensive schools play an important role in determining the outcomes. Local business conditions affect the outcomes of boys but less those of girls. The official quality evaluations adopted in recent years seem to pay attention especially to such aspects of education production that are important for providing capabilities for further studies but less so for employability.

Originality/value

Employability seems to be a great challenge to the initial vocational basic education. The findings for local business conditions give support to the view that measures of education policy do not suffice but need to be complemented with those of regional or employment policy, for example, policies aiming to increase regional mobility of the labour force. Such complementary tools are particularly important for boys.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Laia Castany

The purpose of this paper is to analyse why small firms provide less training to their employees than their larger counterparts. The hypothesis is that large firms are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse why small firms provide less training to their employees than their larger counterparts. The hypothesis is that large firms are endowed with certain firm characteristics that require more training and with some that allow them to obtain larger returns from this investment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses the individual contribution of these characteristics to explain the gap between small and large firms in the probability of providing training and its extent using the Oaxaca‐Blinder decomposition.

Findings

Small firms face greater obstacles in accessing training and the main reasons for that are related to their technological activity and the geographic scope of the market in which they operate. Together, these variables explain about half of the training gap in both the participation and the quantity decisions.

Practical implications

The limited access to training of small firms prevents them from becoming more competitive by using a tool that would permit a better adoption of new technology and access to foreign markets.

Originality/value

The paper exploits the data on training expenditure and relates this investment with other firms' strategies, such as innovation or internationalization. It also suggests estimating this type of data by means of a two‐part model.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

1 – 8 of 8