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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Michael Kleinaltenkamp, Carolin Plewa, Siegfried Gudergan, Ingo Oswald Karpen and Tom Chen

The purpose of this paper is to advance extant theorizing around resource integration by conceptualizing and delineating the notion of a usage center. A usage center…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance extant theorizing around resource integration by conceptualizing and delineating the notion of a usage center. A usage center consists of a combination of interdependent actors that draw on resources across their individual usage processes to create value.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a conceptual inquiry into the usage center.

Findings

This paper delineates the notion of a usage center by way of focal and peripheral resource integrators, as well as focal and peripheral resources that form part of interdependent resource usage processes. The conceptual analysis reveals the need for resources to be accessible and shareable to focal and peripheral actors, with rivalry and emergence central factors influencing the actor’s usage processes.

Originality/value

Responding to recent calls for research developing insights into multi-actor value cocreation, this paper is the first to comprehensively and coherently conceptualize the notion of a usage center. In doing so, the authors build an important foundation for future theorizing related to the potential emergence of usage centers as well as the cocreation of individual and collective value.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Mujeeb ur Rahman Ibneatheer, Pierre Rostan and Alexandra Rostan

The purpose of this paper is to understand, which internal processes (mental, emotional, cultural, ethical and spiritual) Afghan business leaders use when making…

1152

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand, which internal processes (mental, emotional, cultural, ethical and spiritual) Afghan business leaders use when making managerial decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were collected through 1-h face-to-face interviews with Afghan business leaders. Interviews were conducted through open-ended questions in a semi-structured format. This method was considered most appropriate to acquire an understanding of senior executives’ interpretation and usage of decision-making processes. The method of analyzing data was thematic analysis where the researchers identified common themes, topics, ideas and patterns of meaning that come up repetitively. The objective of the analysis was to determine the most frequent decision-making processes by business leaders and the reasons for using these processes.

Findings

Although the usage of internal processes in decision-making are not homogeneous among Afghan business leaders, some of the processes are used more frequently than others such as mental, cultural and ethical processes. During the mental process of decision-making, the majority of leaders use intuitional decision-making, the minority using logic. Regarding the cultural dimension, the majority of leaders stated that they have an open, friendly, caring organization for each employee and horizontal culture in their organization. The minority indicated that they have a friendly culture but they also considered the processes and hierarchy in their organization. Considering the ethical process of decision-making, leaders stated that their priorities are more ethical than getting extra profit. They believe that profit will be generated while considering ethical values. As a leader noted: when you consider ethics and fulfill your obligations, the profit automatically generates. Most leaders use the internal process of emotion in their decision-making, but the usage has not been frequent. The emotional process of decision-making is more involved when the human factor is involved. For instance, one of the participants stated “I did not fire an employee that I had to because he was a needy and poor person.” About the spiritual process of decision-making, although all leaders agreed that they have used spirituality in decision-making, its usage varies. About one-third of the leaders mostly rely on spirituality or on religious teachings during the decision-making process, one-third somehow rely on spirituality or religion, about 50% of the time and one-third rely on spirituality between 25% to 30% of the time.

Originality/value

This study is pilot research as no previous research was carried out on this topic, therefore, it provides a basis of literature on the usage of internal processes on decision-making in Afghanistan. The findings may differ in other economic and national contexts.

Details

PSU Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Richard Glavee-Geo, Aijaz A. Shaikh, Heikki Karjaluoto and Robert Ebo Hinson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the drivers of consumer engagement and its consequences via the experiences of mobile money services’ users in Ghana and to discuss…

1784

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the drivers of consumer engagement and its consequences via the experiences of mobile money services’ users in Ghana and to discuss its implications for the society, financial service innovation, delivery and operations.

Design/methodology/approach

A pre-tested survey instrument was used with a sample of 595 mobile money services users in Ghana. SmartPLS application was used to analyze the data and report findings.

Findings

The study shows that perceived risk, consumer empowerment, subjective norm, performance expectancy and effort expectancy influence the affect component of consumer engagement and explain around half of its variance. The effect of perceived risk on consumer engagement was counterintuitive. Perceived risk was significant and positive for cognitive processing, whereas the effect was significant but negative for affect. The authors found support for the positive effect of cognitive processing on advocacy intention but no support for its effect on continuous usage. By contrast, affect strongly influenced both advocacy intention and continuous usage of mobile money services.

Practical implications

The authors highlight the implications of mobile money services to business and marketing/service managers, policy makers, non-banking entities (such as telecoms and financial technology firms) and to the society in general. The authors provide important insights into how service providers can manage consumer engagement process and formulate marketing strategies to target and promote this simple, but innovative service to consumers. Moreover, the authors discuss the societal implications of the study in Ghana, a developing country. The authors recommend several options for future studies in order to stimulate the research agenda on mobile financial services in general.

Originality/value

The present study shows that although mobile money was initially introduced to help consumers who hitherto have no access to formal banking services, this form of banking has become increasingly popular among various consumer segments as its usage and adoption has increased multifold largely in emerging and developing countries. The main contribution of this study is the development and testing of the “mobile money customer engagement model.” Moreover, this study shows the key factors that influence the engagement process and the effects of these factors as analyzed within the context of a developing country.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Martin Gersch, Michael Hewing and Bernd Schöler

In contemporary times process‐oriented approaches in information management are elementary in meeting business challenges. However, most methods for business process

5732

Abstract

Purpose

In contemporary times process‐oriented approaches in information management are elementary in meeting business challenges. However, most methods for business process management (BPM) focus on improved performance from only the company's perspective. They neglect the growing importance of value co‐creation between company and customer that typically results from a service‐dominant logic. Modern BPM methods need to focus on the internal performance of processes whilst including the customer's perspective. This paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

By combining the market‐oriented approach, service blueprinting, with the syntax of business process modeling, the authors introduce a method that visualizes and analyzes processes simultaneously from the company's and customer's point of view. Within this integrated approach, information management and marketing are linked. A used case illustrates implementation and benefits of this method.

Findings

This paper addresses the gap between marketing and information management sciences. “Business Process Blueprinting” (BP2) provides a conceptual foundation for a further integration of these two scopes of interest.

Research limitations/implications

The integrated view on processes supports an enhanced understanding of process performance. In its current stage, the method reflects a basic combined approach – further development is needed. Well‐established models and tools from controlling and marketing as well as from other fields can be integrated to open this analysis for service elements.

Practical implications

Applying BP2 to practical process analysis promotes a better understanding of the customer's process perception. This potentially leads to a more efficient and effective process design.

Originality/value

The paper introduces the missing method for the integration of the effectiveness‐driven perspective into business process modeling.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Ruzita Jusoh, Daing Nasir Ibrahim and Yuserrie Zainuddin

This paper empirically examined the role of the balanced scorecard (BSC) measures usage as a potential moderator of the business strategy and performance relationship…

1289

Abstract

This paper empirically examined the role of the balanced scorecard (BSC) measures usage as a potential moderator of the business strategy and performance relationship. Samples were taken from 120 manufacturing firms. Results of this study provide evidence that partially support the moderating effects of the BSC measures usage on the strength of the relationship between business strategy and firm performance.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Carolin Ramsteck, Barbara Muslic, Tanja Graf, Uwe Maier and Harm Kuper

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how principals and school supervisory authorities understand and use feedback from mandatory proficiency tests (VERA) in the…

1081

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how principals and school supervisory authorities understand and use feedback from mandatory proficiency tests (VERA) in the low-stakes context of Germany. For the analysis, the authors refer to a theoretical model of schools that differentiates between Autonomous and Managed Professional Organisations (Thiel, 2008a).

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical basis of the qualitative research are contrastive case studies which are focusing on individual schools and on school supervisory authorities. The selection of cases was oriented on Theoretical Sampling according to Glaser and Strauss (2005). For the analysis, the authors used a sample of upper track secondary schools (Gymnasien), four from Berlin and five each from Thuringia, Brandenburg and Baden-Wuerttemberg. In total, the authors conducted 229 structured interviews over two periods in 19 schools with different protagonists on all levels of the educational system (principals, heads of subject departments, teachers and school supervisory officials). The interview data were descriptively analysed according to procedures of qualitative content analyses (Mayring, 2010).

Findings

The analyses show a clear tendency in the direction of the Autonomous Professional Organisation within the context of VERA. However, some principals reported activities according to a Managed Professional Organisation. The traditional decoupling remains and the supervisory authorities retain their picture of the individual school as an Autonomous Professional Organisation. Both levels have a major deficit in a competent use of VERA and lack profound experience with accountability and evaluation processes.

Research limitations/implications

The sampling has certain restraints: schools of a particular type, few schools within one state, four of 16 states.

Originality/value

Even though German test-based school reforms have been in progress for one decade, systematic analyses of the reform’s relevance for leadership and for school supervisory authorities’ actions in a low-stakes context have not been conducted yet. The analysis meets this lack of research with an explorative reconstruction of principal leadership within the context of test-based school reform as well as the corresponding school supervisory officials.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2022

Christine Nya-Ling Tan, Muhammad Ashraf Fauzi and Adedapo Oluwaseyi Ojo

This study aims to posit the extended version of the technology acceptance model to explain the psychological factors of Muslim university students’ smartphone addictive…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to posit the extended version of the technology acceptance model to explain the psychological factors of Muslim university students’ smartphone addictive behaviour and neglect of studies. In particular, this research conceptualised addictive behaviour as smartphone dependency and proposed process usage, flow, habitual smartphone behaviour and preference for online social interaction (POSI) as the associated factors. Besides, this study investigated the effect of smartphone dependency on the neglect of studies.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the quantitative research design, this research tested the proposed model using data collected from Muslim students’ smartphone users in Malaysia. The analyses were based on the partial least squares–structural equation modelling technique.

Findings

The results revealed that flow has the most significant influence on smartphone dependency. Habitual behaviour and process usage were also significant predictors, but POSI was not significantly associated with smartphone dependency. Also, smartphone dependency was significantly related to the neglect of studies.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides empirical support to guide university management in preventing Muslim students’ over-dependence on smartphones. The Muslim community is synonymous with time management, where overdependence would diminish students’ religious and academic responsibilities. Such overdependence can cause neglect of studies; thus, the research findings can assist the university in introducing policies and campaigns that can educate students on the negative consequences of this pervasive digital addiction and ways to overcome them. This study contributes to the body of knowledge in understanding Muslim students coping mechanisms through smartphone usage.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by demonstrating the psychological factors of smartphone addiction and the resultant effect on the neglect of studies among Muslim university students.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Kamla Ali Al‐Busaidi

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the payoffs of a corporate portal in an academic institution in Oman and its impacts on business processes and employees.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the payoffs of a corporate portal in an academic institution in Oman and its impacts on business processes and employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The study included 100 employees, mostly instructors, in an academic institution. The questionnaire included indicators related to the portal usage, employees’ benefits (learning, adaptability and job satisfaction) and business processes’ benefits (effectiveness, efficiency and innovativeness) constructs. Data were analyzed by PLS‐Graph 3.0, a variance‐based structural equation modeling software.

Findings

Results revealed that corporate portal has significant returns on employees’ learning, adaptability and job satisfaction, and business processes’ effectiveness, efficiency and innovation. All six hypotheses in this study were supported.

Originality/value

The paper provides empirical evidence for practitioners and researchers on the benefits of a corporate portal in an academic institution in Oman.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Jaakko Siltaloppi and Suvi Nenonen

Research on value co‐creation has gained ground rapidly but remained at a very theoretical level. Thus, it has provided relatively little insight into the nature of…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on value co‐creation has gained ground rapidly but remained at a very theoretical level. Thus, it has provided relatively little insight into the nature of individual processes of service provision/value creation, and how firms interact with their customers and contribute to their value creation processes. On this basis, the purpose of this paper is to identify and elaborate possible roles firms and their customers enact in the service provision/value creation process.

Design/methodology/approach

The research utilizes a multiple case study approach building primarily on qualitative interview data from eight service concepts in the Finnish residential real estate industry.

Findings

The research reveals three roles of the firm based on the extent to which firms engage in service provision/value creation processes with their customers. At one extreme, the output of the firms acts as a resource, which is transformed into an outcome and used by the customers. At the other, firms and customers jointly co‐create value, with the firm coordinating the whole offering for the customer. In between, firms transform their resources into relatively standardized outcomes, which customers use in their value creation processes.

Research limitations/implications

The results contribute to the understanding of service provision by categorizing firm‐customer interaction into differing configurations of roles. This reinforces the notion that the depth of interaction affects the extent to which value is co‐created between the firm and customer; different services having different configurations of roles which shape the interaction. Limited to eight service cases, the results only exemplify aggregate role configurations. Moreover, by focusing only on the perspectives of firm representatives, the results do not allow a closer analysis on customer‐specific roles in the value creation process.

Originality/value

This research presents an empirical analysis and interpretation of the service co‐production/value co‐creation process, complementing the extensive theoretical research on the topic. Particularly, the results display different depths of interaction between firms and their customers in co‐producing and co‐creating value, which suggests that it is not necessarily meaningful to consider everything co‐creation from an empirical perspective.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 May 2020

Frank Einhorn, Jack Meredith and Carl Marnewick

Literature indicates that the business case for projects is difficult to use and suggests that there are organizational factors that can facilitate effective use of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Literature indicates that the business case for projects is difficult to use and suggests that there are organizational factors that can facilitate effective use of the business case. This paper aims to identify such facilitators, measure their presence and importance, and relate them to the actual practice of business case processes.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross sectional quantitative method was used, with data on facilitators and business case process usage gathered through an online questionnaire.

Findings

The findings for the 43 organizational facilitators are that each one is considered more important than its presence in the respondents' organizations. High correlations emerge between the presence of the facilitators and the use of business case processes, indicating the pivotal role of the facilitators.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted for business IT projects implemented by organizations based in South Africa. It furthers our understanding of project business cases and suggests additional research avenues in this area.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that organizations could improve key facilitators at an affordable cost. Such improvement would enable more effective use of the business case throughout the project's lifetime – from initial concept until planned benefits have been substantially realized. Better use of the business case would also support governance and increase the success rate of business IT projects.

Originality/value

Organizational facilitators of business case processes are identified and categorized for the first time, leading to measurements of their perceived importance and presence in organizations. Hence, the relationship between these facilitators and actual business case usage is determined, suggesting areas of optimum impact.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 59000