Search results

1 – 10 of 829
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Soohyung Joo and Jee Yeon Lee

This study aims to develop a measurement instrument, which involves four usability dimensions of efficiency, effectiveness, satisfaction, and learnability, as a way of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a measurement instrument, which involves four usability dimensions of efficiency, effectiveness, satisfaction, and learnability, as a way of assessing the usability of academic digital libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

To generate measurement items, previous research related to usability frameworks, usability guidelines, and empirical usability tests was reviewed. The measurement instrument was then verified in terms of reliability and validity, empirically using data from 230 actual users of an academic digital library. To ensure the reliability of the instrument, internal consistency of measurements, measurement item reliability, and construct reliability were examined. Construct validity, which consists of convergent validity and discriminant validity, was also examined on the basis of confirmatory factor analysis using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The usability evaluation instrument suggested in this study comprises four dimensions: efficiency, effectiveness, satisfaction, and learnability, and three to four items were identified to measure each dimension.

Originality/value

To date, while many of the usability studies have relied on either experimental methods or inspection methods, few studies have been conducted to identify evaluation measures that can assess the usability of a digital library from a survey method. This study is one of a few studies to develop a measurement instrument tailored to academic digital library environments.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2008

Marjo‐Riitta Aitta, Saana Kaleva and Terttu Kortelainen

The purpose of the paper is to present usability heuristics for the evaluation of public library web services.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to present usability heuristics for the evaluation of public library web services.

Design/methodology/approach

Heuristics for library services are based on Nielsen's classical list of heuristics and results of previous usability research of library web services. A total of 15 public library web sites were evaluated on the basis of these applied heuristics. One part of the study was supported through usability tests. The results of these studies were utilized to evaluate the applied heuristics.

Findings

The applied heuristics are divided into three categories: heuristics critical from the usability viewpoint; heuristics concerning major problems; and heuristics connected to minor usability problems but still important and concerning conventions of web design. The use of the heuristics and the results they give are evaluated to provide a basis for their use in future.

Research limitations/implications

The applied heuristics lists have been tested in two different studies, and the combined list based on them has so far been utilized in practical evaluation, but has not been formally tested.

Practical implications

The heuristics for library web services presented in this paper can be applied to usability evaluation of public library web services.

Originality/value

Library web sites should be user friendly, because the services are meant for all citizens. The applied heuristics for public library web services provide a starting point for usability evaluation that can be continued with other methods.

Details

New Library World, vol. 109 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Audrone Glosiene and Zinaida Manzhukh

The aim of this paper is to define the main directions and emerging challenges in adoption of general usability principles by the memory institutions.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to define the main directions and emerging challenges in adoption of general usability principles by the memory institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretical analysis of usability concepts, usability management processes, methods and evaluation criteria found in the Human‐Computer Interaction professional literature and ISO standards is performed.

Findings

Usability should become a part of quality management activities in memory institutions and will change and expand traditional practices in this sphere. ISO standards and theoretical models may be applied to create a framework for usability management in memory institutions both on strategic and operational levels. However, further research in the scope of joint cultural heritage services, audiences, contexts of use and applied technology in the sector of memory institutions should be performed. The main challenges on the way towards the usability framework are cultivation of partnership culture and multidisciplinary teamwork in development and provision of ICT‐based services and application of complex and overlapping recommendations provided by volumnious ISO standards.

Originality/value

The main value of the paper is the comprehensive analysis of state‐of‐the‐art in usability and provision of the main directions and challenges of usability adoption in memory institutions. This analysis maps the future research and practical activities necessary for successful adoption of usability management in libraries, museums and archives.

Details

New Library World, vol. 106 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Nadjla Hariri and Yaghoub Norouzi

The present study aims to review the literature concerning Digital Libraries (DLs) and user interfaces in order to identify, determine, and suggest evaluation criteria for…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to review the literature concerning Digital Libraries (DLs) and user interfaces in order to identify, determine, and suggest evaluation criteria for a DLs user interface. Accordingly, this study's objectives are threefold: explore which criteria exert a significant relationship with the DLs user interface; identify a set of criteria that appears to be useful for evaluating DLs user interface; and determine evaluation criteria that have more frequency and occurrence in the related texts reviewed.

Design/methodology/approach

To do it, first, identifying related texts was necessary. Consequently, keywords such as “DLs user interface evaluation”,” DLs user interfaces”, “DLs evaluation”, “DLs usability”, “user interface evaluation”, “DLs research”, “web sites user interface evaluation”, “user interface standards”, and the like have been searched in the web as well as in some leading databases including Emerald, Proquest, SagePub, ScienceDirect, LISA, ERIC, ACM, and Springer. After identifying and accessing more than 100 evaluative works and some related articles, theoretical and empirical, nearly 50 sources were chosen for final examination.

Findings

After reviewing related texts, three major categories are identified: user interface and DLs; DLs and usability; and other studies related to user interface; each one of three identified categories has its own subcategories. Additionally, 22 evaluation criteria for assessing DLs interface have been identified.

Research limitations/implications

The review does not claim to be comprehensive.

Practical implications

Hopefully, criteria such as feedback, ease of use, match between system and the real world, customization, user support, user workload, interaction, compatibility, visibility of system status, user experience, flexibility, and accessibility which have been less considered should be applied more in future, particularly user‐oriented, studies. Furthermore, it is expected that criteria mentioned here could help related bodies pay more attention to the evaluation of EISs, especially DLs interface.

Originality/value

It can be said that this study has contributed to the research into the evaluation of DL interface.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Susan McMullen

An intuitive library information gateway is critical to meeting the information needs of library users in the digital age. This article describes the process involved in…

Abstract

An intuitive library information gateway is critical to meeting the information needs of library users in the digital age. This article describes the process involved in redesigning a library Web site. In addition to first determining the goals and requirements for the library Web site, a user and task analysis was conducted for defining the library’s user base and the types of tasks which users might be performing at the site. Usability testing methods, such as observational interviews, provided fresh insights about how users are interacting with the library Web interface as they approach various information seeking tasks. These usability studies uncovered problems related to unclear terminology, proper use of color, size, and location for navigational links, and the need for context sensitive help, built‐in redundancy, and clear and consistent navigation.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Junior Tidal

This paper aims to describe the process, testing, and data analysis of redesigning a library's homepage to create a more user‐centered experience.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the process, testing, and data analysis of redesigning a library's homepage to create a more user‐centered experience.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey and a usability test were conducted to collect data on users' interactions. The goals were to make design changes catered to users' needs, prior to migrating the site to a content management system.

Findings

Recommendations are made to improve the usability of the Ursula C. Schwerin library homepage, as well as considerations for future testing.

Originality/value

This case study will be useful for librarians and web programmers implementing usability tests for the first time. It will also be useful for those focusing on developing a more user‐centered homepage.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Sue Weddell

Abstract

Details

Library Management, vol. 30 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Huai Jian Beh, Ali Rashidi, Amin Talei and Yee Sye Lee

The construction site operates under a hazardous environment that requires a high level of understanding in building systems to minimise accidents. However, the current…

Abstract

Purpose

The construction site operates under a hazardous environment that requires a high level of understanding in building systems to minimise accidents. However, the current building education generally adopts paper-based learning approaches that lack hands-on experiences. Furthermore, to achieve Industrial Revolution 4.0 in line with any unforeseen pandemic, the most optimum solution is to transition from physical to technological-based building education. This paper aims to address the problems by proposing a game-based virtual reality (GBVR) for building utility inspection training.

Design/methodology/approach

The feasibility of the GBVR for building the utility inspection training approach is validated on a sample of undergraduate engineering students through user experience (survey) and performance-based comparisons against traditional paper-based training method.

Findings

The results show that the developed GBVR training has higher system usability in terms of visual output and knowledge retention than paper-based training due to visualisation technologies. The GBVR training method has also higher user-friendliness because of the higher motivational and engagement factors through the adoption of virtual reality and game-based learning.

Research limitations/implications

GBVR training required a longer training duration and achieved a lower performance score (effectiveness) but can be improved by transitioning into hands-on tasks. This study has the potentials to be extended to vocational training platforms for competency development in the construction workforce by using cutting-edge extended reality technologies.

Originality/value

This paper portrays the benefits of integrating virtual reality technology in building education to overcome the low practicality and engagement of paper-based training.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Daniel Cunliffe

The number and range of organisations developing a Web site is growing rapidly. Many of these Web sites are developed in‐houseeven though the skills and resources required…

Abstract

The number and range of organisations developing a Web site is growing rapidly. Many of these Web sites are developed in‐houseeven though the skills and resources required for developing a successful site may not be available. It is argued that some of the limitations in terms of resources and skills inherent in the small‐scale in‐house development environment can be overcome through the adoption of an informal Web site development model and suitable usability methods. Presents an informal development model synthesised from a review of development case studies and published Web research literature. This model identifies the main stages and tasks of development. A review of information gathering and usability methods currently being employed is integrated into the model. The importance of understanding user and information provider needs is discussed. A number of common usability methods are then examined in greater detail. The appropriateness of the model and methods for the small‐scale in‐house development environment is considered.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2012

Panagiotis Zaharias and Panayiotis Koutsabasis

The purpose of this paper is to discuss heuristic evaluation as a method for evaluating e‐learning courses and applications and more specifically to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss heuristic evaluation as a method for evaluating e‐learning courses and applications and more specifically to investigate the applicability and empirical use of two customized e‐learning heuristic protocols.

Design/methodology/approach

Two representative e‐learning heuristic protocols were chosen for the comparative analysis. These protocols augment the “traditional” heuristic sets so as to cover technology‐enhanced learning properties. Two reviewers that have considerable experience in usability evaluation as well as in e‐learning were involved in this comparative analysis. Coverage, distribution and redundancy were employed as three basic criteria for conducting the evaluation

Findings

The main results of the study indicate that both heuristic protocols exhibit wide coverage of potential usability problems. The distribution of usability problems is uneven to a large number of heuristics for both heuristic sets, which reveals that some heuristics are more general than others.

Originality/value

This study shows the empirical application of two heuristic protocols in a usability evaluation of e‐learning applications. Furthermore, it provides a comparison of the two heuristic sets according to a set of criteria and provides a first set of suggestions regarding further development and validation of these heuristic sets.

1 – 10 of 829